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This is what the Earth looks like from space in 4K Ultra HD

by on September 13, 2014
 

by Stephan Jukic September 13th, 2014

What do you get when you take a high end 4K equipped Video camera into orbital space and start shooting? Some truly spectacular video of our little blue world.

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst took a Soyuz flight up to the ISS (International Space Station) equipped with a Ultra HD 4K video camera that he used to capture a truly majestic video sequence of the Earth’s movement below the space station. For those of you who have a 4K TV or PC monitor, set your YouTube settings to watch this in the resolution and get ready to have your breath taken away.

Even if your screen doesn’t support 4K, this is still one beautiful video sequence in 1080p Full HD. For many of us, the 4K experience of this video on a large screen is the closest we could possibly get right now to really understanding what our beautiful world looks like when viewed from the deep black abyss of space surrounding it.

Gert’s time lapse video of the planet’s rotation is a montage made from a massive sequence of still photographs that were captured at a “Cinematic Grade” 4K resolution of 4,256 x 2832 pixels at a rate of one shot taken every second. The final sequence of many still shots was then converted into a smoothly flowing 4K movie at a final video resolution of 3,840 x 2,160 pixels.

Given that the photos taken at one second intervals are played at a rate of 25 frames per second in the video itself, what you’re watching is a film sequence running at 25 times the speed it had when viewed by the astronauts in real life.

The artistic effects of brilliant cities, stars and other bright objects with trailing tails of light were created by superimposing the still images and fading them slowly.

Watch the video, whether you have a 4K display screen or not, it is a sincerely beautiful film clip of our fragile Earth.

Story by 4k.com

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