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Vizio M-Series 2016 4K UHD HDR Smart TV Review (M50-DI, M55-DO, M60-D1, M65-D0, M70-D3, M80-D3)

by on September 21, 2016
Details
 
Manufacture
Overview

After first surprising consumers and competitors with their then excellent first edition P-Series 4K full-array LED backlit 4K TVs in late 2014, Vizio went on to release several new 4K TV editions for 2015 and now 2016, all of which were good to great. The 2015 D-Series 4K TV models and M-Series TVs have now also joined the 2016 P-Series second edition 4K HDR TVs to also be re-released with a completely revamped smart TV system and with the addition of some rather excellent HDR technology for expanded color and contrast quality which completely outdo what we saw in the 2014 and 2015 versions of these TVs.

In 2016, the Vizio P-Series is the definite flagship line of 4K TVs but still comes priced very reasonably for its superb quality and the M-Series we’re reviewing here now is the second-tier 4K HDR line for this year. With that, the 2016 M-Series models offer a mix of excellent display specs, some very good motion control and smart TV features and at the same time manage to be even more affordable than their P-Series cousins, with only moderate decreases in specs quality, mainly in the form of a smaller number of dimming zones and a few other not so serious details.

The Good

More than anything, the thing to really love about Vizio’s new M-Series 4K TVs is the simple fact that they offer the best blend of price and quality on today’s market bar none. The P-Series TVs of 2016 are definitely better models but the M-Series is even cheaper and for what it costs, the HDR, color, motion control specs and smart features are marvelous. This is something of a holy grail 4K TV in terms of how well it represents what we’ve always wanted to see in the 4K television market: Superb pricing and superb quality for those low prices.

Moving along, the M-Series, like its P-series counterparts, also offers Dolby Vision HDR technology standardization and now also offers HDR10 standardization as well, allowing for a maximum compatibility with a wide range of 4K UHD HDR content sources from both streaming media and hard video sources like 4K Blu-ray or downloaded set-top box movies and shows. This makes the M-Series a fully modern line of 4K TVs that will likely let you watch the most advanced types of 4K content at least for the short term future, and even if content HDR specs advance still further for the corresponding HDR enhancements we might expect in 2017, the picture quality offered by the 2016 M-Series is not likely to disappoint any TV owner any time soon.

Next, For the M-Series, Vizio has really delivered a wide range of sizes for all budgets and space requirements and even introduced panel technology variation for the sake of different display styles. Thus, with the M-Series, you can select from the smallest 50 inch model with only 32 local dimming zones, which retails for an extremely affordable $840 dollars or you can move right up to a gigantic 80 inch M-Series set with 64 local dimming zones and a price tag of $3,999. That’s expensive but it’s also the cheapest such price tag for any name brand 4K TV in this size range we’ve yet seen. And, as we said, panel technology is also slightly varied, with the 60 inch M60-D1 offering lower contrast IPS display that does however offer superior color performance.

Moving along, we love the fact that Vizio has invested so carefully in precisely developing a compact and apparently affordable type of full-array LED backlighting arrangement that they can fit into every single one of their 2016 M-Series TVs, from the smallest to the largest. The 50 inch M50-D1 offers up only 32 dimming zones but all other models from 55 inches up to the largest 80 inch giant M-Series model comes with 64 local dimming zones. This doesn’t quite compare to the 126 and 128 local dimming zones offered by the P-Series models but we’re talking about full-array local dimming, not its weaker edge-lit version here. And this is an impressive technology to see in such reasonably priced 4K TVs.

Finally, we can’t help but love the innovative spark that Vizio put into its new SmartCast mobile app-based smart TV platform. This is a complete changeover from the smart technology of previous Vizio 4K TVs and a different type of smart TV from anything we’ve seen in any other 2016 4K TV . With SmartCast, your smart platform isn’t displayed inside the Vizio TV itself but instead presents itself in a downloadable mobile app which you can install on any compatible Android or iOS smartphone or tablet. In the M-Series, the app comes with a 6 inch tablet remote that’s included in all of Vizio’s M-Series TVs from 55 inches on upwards but even if you buy the smallest of the M-Series TVs or simply lose the tablet that comes with the bigger models, you can simply download it to another mobile device. This app serves as the smart hub, streaming apps control and TV remote system for the M-Series 2016 4K HDR TVs and while it isn’t without its flaws (more on this shortly) it’s definitely a useful piece of technology, especially since it also includes Google Cast technology.

Here is a list of all 2016 Vizio M Series TV Models for Sale at Best Buy.

The bad

There’s little to complain about in the 2016 Vizio M-Series 4K TVs, especially with the price tag these models are selling at. However, a couple of weaknesses are worth noting.

First of all, the same SmartCast app arrangement for smart TV which we applauded above can also sometimes get annoying with its glitches. For one thing, the connection between SmartCast and 4K TV can suddenly be dropped out of the blue and requires momentary waiting for it to reestablish itself. And furthermore, the responsiveness of on-screen activity to a user’s control of the app itself can lag at times. This second defect of SmartCast is actually more common and more annoying than the first one above, with the input lag being something to make your face go red if it happens while you’re doing something in a bit of a hurry.

Additionally, the M-Series doesn’t quite offer the degree of brightness we’d expect from a full-array line of 4K TVs. While this is definitely one of the most minor complaints we could make about these TVs, it’s worth noting. Their overall peak brightness and contrast levels are superb but they don’t quite come close to matching what Samsung’s edge-lit 2016 SUHD TV models can put out and that’s definitely a bit disappointing to see in a TV with full-array LED backlighting. The compensation here however is that the local dimming of the M-Series and its P-Series cousins definitely beats that of any edge-lit 4K TV.

Next, Vizio’s upscaling engine for non-4K content is great and works superbly at not only increasing the sharpness of Full HD video but also its perceived contrast and color delivery. However, for 720p and 480p SD content, that same upscaling drops the ball just a bit. A sort of hazy effect becomes notable and while it isn’t too bad we’ve seen sharper reformatting of low resolution video sources in other 4K TV models for this year and even 2015.

Final Thoughts

In our final view of the 2016 M-Series 4K TVs, we’d have to say that they offer some excellent overall picture quality which is arguably the best there is for the sorts of lower prices these 2016 4K TVs sell for. You may be able to find 2015 models with even better specs and similar pricing but if you’re looking for this year’s 4K TV technology, the M-Series is superb for its price tag.

Specs

• Screen size: 50 diagonal inches, 54.6 diagonal inches 64.5 diagonal inches, 75, diagonal inches
• Smart TV: Vizio SmartCast Mobile smart TV app
• HEVC (H.265, H.264) Included: Yes
• VP9 Included. Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 120Hz native refresh rate (Clear Action 360) in 50 and 55 inch models,
240Hz refresh with Clear Action 720 in 60, 65, 70 and 80 inch models
• Screen Lighting: Full-array LED backlighting with multi-zone local dimming
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes both built-in WiFi and Ethernet port
• Remotes: Android tablet remote with SmartCast, also includes small conventional button remote
• Connectivity: 5 HDMI 2.0a ports (4 in 50 inch model), 2 USB ports, 1 Ethernet port, 1 Digital Optical audio out, 1 component in, 1 RCA Audio out
• Sound: DTS Studio Sound and DTS TruSurround
• Contrast Ratio: 5140 : 1
• Black Level maximum: 0.021 cd/m2
• 3D Technology: None
• Processor: Octa Core

Highlights

HDR: Dolby Vision HDR and HDR10 HDR in a planned set of firmware updates for 2016 are both standards represented in the Vizio M-Series 4K ultra HD TV lines, from the smallest to the largest model. While the peak luminosity of these TVs isn’t exactly up to par with the standards promoted by the UHD Alliance at a peak brightness which does not quite reach 1100 nits, the models still produce a decent level of high dynamic range and more importantly, manage a superbly high contrast ratio of just over 5,000:1. Samsung’s SUHD 4K TVs from 2016 and Vizio’s still better built 2016 P-Series models offer superior HDR specs by a considerable margin and also include wide color gamut space coverage (which is lacking in the M-Series 4K TVs), but the M-Series still delivers some very decent HDR specs.

SmartCast app: Vizio’s SmartCast app is present in all 2016 4K TV models and in the larger 55 inch+ M-Series TVs, the 6 inch Full HD Android tablet remote is also included with the SmartCast app installed on it. With SmartCast, Vizio has created a truly unique new smart TV viewing experience that we definitely think has some promise to it. In a certain way it’s also more practical since it allows for much greater smart TV and TV remote flexibility, with the app-based smart TV platform (SmartCast) being downloadable to any or multiple external mobile devices while offering all the same or better functionality and apps access as the older TV-based Internet Apps Plus smart platform of the 2015 Vizio 4K TVs.
SmartCast also comes with Google Cast technology for streaming and control between TV and mobile device.

4K content access: Unlike all of the 2015 and 2014 Vizio 4K TVs, the new 2016 models come with both HEVC and VP9 4K content compression support, allowing for a wider range of ultra HD streaming content options. Furthermore, with the addition of Dolby Vision and HDR10 high dynamic range, the new TVs can also support the latest sources of HDR content from the major providers such as 4K Blu-ray, Amazon Prime, Vudu and Netflix. This represents a marked improvement from the content options in 2015.

Octa-core processor: Most of the 4K TVs we review, even the premium name brand models, come with quad core processing power. In contrast, all of the Vizio M-Series TVs (and of course of all of the Vizio P-Series models as well) come with even more robust Octa-core processors that allow for a speedy, powerful and stutter or freeze-free smart TV and content browsing experience. Furthermore, they help upscale a wide array of content and process native 4K content efficiently and smoothly. This processing power is also largely what’s responsible for the mostly excellent motion control and motion interpolation abilities of the M-Series.

full-array LED backlight: Unlike nearly any other major 4K TV brand, Vizio makes a solid effort to deliver full array LED backlighting to virtually all of its 4K TV models across the board and while the brightness of those LEDs may not be quite as robust as what we’ve seen in Samsung’s 2016 and 2015 4K TVs, it’s still something quite impressive which furthermore allows for some great local dimming technology. In the M-Series, all of the 55 inch and larger TVs offer up 64 local dimming zones thanks to their full-array LED backlights.

Visual Specs

In terms of visual specs, the M-Series offers a sort of turbo-charged 2015 M-Series display quality. On the one hand, specs for contrast, black uniformity and black level along with peak brightness have all been enhanced while on the other hand, color spectrum coverage remains largely the same as it did last year. This because the HDR technology of the 2016 M-Series 4K TVs does not offer Wide Color Gamut as it does in the 2016 P-Series models. Nonetheless, the 2016 M-Series TV still deliver some truly stunning display quality when you consider just how affordable they are.

Thus, as far as contrast goes, the M-Series manages a very decent contrast rating of 5100:1 that includes black levels of roughly 0.021 nits and white levels of 102 nits. Furthermore, these TVs offer peak brightness in a smaller 10% display window of just over 520 cd/m2 (nits). This is pretty decent peak brightness but not quite up to the superb levels we’ve seen in the Samsung 2016 SUHD TVs or in Vizio’s 2016 P-Series models. Nonetheless, the 2016 M-Series offers up a sort of lower-caliber HDR technology which will definitely create a more realistic and vibrant range of contrast and color combination in native 4K HDR content on your TV screen. It’s worth noting that while the rest of the 2016 M-Series TVs come with high contrast VA (Vertical Alignment) panel display technology, the 60 inch model has an IPS display, which means a lower contrast than what we detail above but at the same time greater color quality and much broader viewing angles. The VA TVs offer more limited viewing angles.

As for color, the M-Series models don’t offer the same HDR Wide Color Gamut specs as their P-Series cousins or other name brand 2016 HDR 4K TVs like Sony’s XBR-D 2016 4K HDR models or Samsung’s SUHD TVs but they still do offer 10-bit color processing ability and manage to deliver coverage for about 75% of the DCI-P3 color space. This is a level comparable to the color delivery of the 2015 M-Series and those older TVs offered solid if not spectacular color performance. We should also note that HDR and high contrast levels both work to enhance the quality of delivered colors in the M-Series displays even if they don’t have the same wide color as their better competitors.

Vizio also delivers some excellent motion control technology in the M-Series models, with very decent motion blur control, excellent judder control and full 24p playback along with some very functional motion interpolation technology.

Connectivity

Connectivity-wise, the M-Series comes with the same essential package of technologies as that found in most mainstream 4K TVs from this year. These are essentials like five HDMI 2.0 (soon to be 2.0a ports via firmware update), two USB ports 2.0 ports, and the usual component/composite and digital audio in ports. Furthermore, there is of course also Ethernet connectivity and built-in WiFi access for streaming content from the web and running the SmartCast remote control app’s Google Cast functionality. Additionally, the M-Series delivers access to a wide range of built-in 4K streaming media and non-4K media app of all sorts, with some offerings, like the Vudu 4K HDR movies app, which are specific to Vizio 4K TVs due to their Dolby Vision HDR standards.

We'd also like to note that that users don’t need to use the SmartCast app itself to access online content. If one is already familiar with an App from Vudu, or Netflix for example (or any of the thousands of other Cast-enabled apps), they can cast content directly from the App to the screen of the M-Series TV or other Vizio SmartCast 4K TVs. You can even Cast from the Chrome browser on your laptop or PC if you like.

Pricing

The M-Series 4K TVs are priced very affordably and due to the numerous sizes in this line, a TV for nearly any moderate to modest budget is available. Thus, these models include the small 50 inch M50-D1, which retails for just $849 and from there Vizio has priced the other models at the following levels:

M55-D0 55 inches $999
M60-D1 60 inches $1,249
M65-D0 65 inches $1,499
M70-D3 70 inches $1,999
M80-D3 80 inches $3,999

Here is a list of all 2016 Vizio M Series TV for Sale at Best Buy.


Not so Great

To summarize the less than ideal aspects of the M-Series, they consist mainly of what we’d call minor problems which are far from deal-breakers. Quite the contrary in fact –considering the price range of these TVs, they’re remarkably robust and high quality models. That said, we don’t quite like the SD content upscaling of the M-Series and would have liked to see a still brighter level of peak luminosity considering that they come with full-array LED backlighting. Furthermore, the color quality, while good, is not quite as superb as what we’ve seen in the P-Series cousins of the M-Series.

Finally, the SmartCast app definitely could use a bit of debugging for lap issues and the occasional problem of a dropped remote connection. This is of course an entirely new smart TV technology from Vizio, so we expect or at least hope that it will be refined further as the year progresses.

Positives

• Excellent contrast
• SmartCast is pretty cool
• Great color accuracy
• Smooth motion control technology
• Excellent prices
• Rich deep blacks
• Many sizes and prices
• supports HDR10 and Dolby Vision

Negatives

• SmartCast sometimes glitches
• Peak brightness could be better
• No HDR color support (wide Color Gamut)

Editor Rating
 
Features
A-

 
Quality
A

 
User Friendliness
A-

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
A-

Total Score
A-

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User Rating
 
Features
B-

 
Quality
B

 
User Friendliness
B+

 
Connectivity
B

 
Price
B

User Score
67 ratings
B

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Bottom Line
 

The 2016 Vizio M-Series TVs are not only superb for their price as 2016 4K TVs but are excellent and competitive 4K TV models even by the standards of premium ultra HD TVs for this year. We definitely recommend them if you want 4K resolution, HDR and great display at a very reasonable price.

Here is a list of all 2016 Vizio M Series TV for Sale at Best Buy.

 
32 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • Chris
    September 21, 2016 at 10:27 am

    Stephen,

    I’d like to hear your thoughts on the differences between the Samsung UN55KS800 and the Vizio M55-D0. I’m torn between the two, especially given the fact that the Vizio is now going for $800 vs the Samsung $1400. How close are they really in terms of specs, especially HDR?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 23, 2016 at 10:51 am

      Hey there Chris. While the 2016 M-Series 4K TV is a great model for a lower budget, with HDR support (but no HDR color) and great general display performance, the KS8000 is the much better 4K TV for display quality in our view. It offers much higher peak brightness, great black performance and contrast and even better motion control specs than the M-Series. The only two specs on which the M-Series beats the KS8000 are the much higher quality of its local dimming due to the TV’s full-array LED backlighting (the KS8000 only has edge-lit LED backlighting) and its dual HDR support for content mastered in both Dolby Vision and HDR10. However, because there is no wide color gamut or much broader 10-bit color in the M-Series, half the HDR display value for that content is lost to this TV, unlike the KS8000, which does offer full HDR color specs.

      Reply

  • Phil
    October 28, 2016 at 6:45 pm

    Hey Stephen,
    Between the Vizio M and the Samsung KU6300, I’d like to know which one you would recommend. Are they close in terms of performance?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 29, 2016 at 2:47 pm

      Hello Phil, overall, I’d say that the Samsung KU6300 model is slightly better. Both offer overall performance and the Black levels offered by both 4K TVs are good, but the KU6300 delivers 10-bit color and superior black level performance. Also, the Black uniformity of the Samsung TV is better. Both 4K TVs are similarly good for console gaming as well but I’d say that the one area in which the M-Series is definitely better is on its motion control specs, for motion blur, motion interpolation and 24p judder-fee content playback. However, for overall picture quality, go for the KU6300 insteadof the M-Series.

      Reply

      • Colin Reekie
        December 19, 2016 at 9:53 am

        I have a similar comparison question, I am down to these two products as well, i mainly use tv for movie streaming, and football.. given that the Samsung has some blur issues, is it noticeable when watching sports.

        Reply

      • Chris
        February 27, 2017 at 8:00 am

        You would recommend picture quality over motion blur and judder?

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          March 1, 2017 at 12:14 am

          Hello Chris. motion blur and judder control are secondary aspects of picture quality, but I won’t say it’s unimportant to have a TV that runs both smoothly. However, the primary and most important TV display metrics are for black level, contrast, color performance and peak brightness. Focus on these first if you’re choosing between TVs. Judder is something many people won’t even notice too much and motion blur in even the cheapest name brand 4K TVs today is usually mild enough to be easy to overlook, especially if you activate motion interpolation to a low level for minimal soap opera effect.

          It’s also worth noting that today’s premium 4K TVs, including all premium 2015, 2016 models as well from all the major brands tend to offer exceptional motion handling, judder control while also delivering superb color, contrast and black level performance. Motion blur and judder are more commonly (slight) issues in budget and mid-range 4K TVs.

          Reply

  • Jay
    November 5, 2016 at 7:02 pm

    Hi Stephen,

    Loved your review. Thank you. Looking at 60″ 4K models and comparing the Vizio M60-D1 to the Samsung KS8000. Samsung just reduced the price of the KS8000 so now there is only a few hundred dollar difference. The TV will be wall mounted and generally watched at night in our bedroom. My concern is the Samsung is an edge lit display vs. Vizio’s Full Array LED Backlighting. But Vizio’s use of IPS Display seems to create a warning from reviewers to “stay away”. Recommendations?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 18, 2016 at 12:59 am

      Hey there Jay. I’d suggest you go for the Samsung TV instead. Yes, the Vizio model offers better local dimming due to its full-array panel but this doesn’t compensate for all the other ways in which the KS8000 is the better TV. First of all, the Samsung model offers wide color gamut and HDR color, both of which the M-Series lacks. Secondly, the peak brightness and black levels of the KS8000 are far superior to those of this M-Series. Finally, IPS may provide better viewing angles than VA panel design but it devastates a TVs contrast and black performance. It’s btter for 4K monitors or for TVs in an office where people will be watching from all sorts of odd angles. Not so much for a living room. Go for the KS8000, without doubt you’ll be happier.

      Also, I recommend you check out our new and highly detailed ebook guide to buying a 4K TV, It covers numerous crucial details about your next 4K TV purchase and allows you a chance to email me directly for detailed answers to future questions.

      Reply

  • pedro sanchez
    November 11, 2016 at 9:02 am

    Hi Stephen

    i used to have a samsung and what i did was to plug my HardDrive with MKV ripped movies and play them direclty
    is it possible to do it on this TV?

    Reply

  • Philip
    November 16, 2016 at 7:56 am

    Hey Stephen,

    I have been looking to purchase the M70-d3 or the Samsung 65KS8000/65KS8500. Is the 5 more inches worth giving up what seems to be a better picture in the Samsung? Also now that the KS8000 and 8500 are pretty much the same price is it worth it to get the curve? Thanks in advance!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 18, 2016 at 12:53 am

      Hey there Philip, to answer your first question, I’d definitely go for the Samsung SUHD models over the Vizio M-Series. The tradeoff in picture quality for a few less inches is absolutely worthwhile in this case. If we were talking about the Vizio P-Series, I’d argue that maybe the larger Vizio is a better choice but the M-Series is nowhere near as good a 4K TV as the Samsung models are and it doesn’t even offer wide color gamut or 10-bit color as do both the P-Series and the Samsung SUHD TVs. Go for the Samsungs.

      As for your second question, The only difference between the KS8000 and the KS8500 is the curve and as we’ve explained in detail here in our comparison between curved and flat TVs, the curve is pointless as anything except an aesthetic preference. It’s not worth paying extra money for or choosing because it offers a few minor detriments over a flat display.

      Reply

      • Philip
        November 18, 2016 at 5:53 am

        Thank you! Very helpful!

        Reply

      • Philip
        November 22, 2016 at 11:48 am

        So I bought the ks8000 Sunday night, and I am having some bad judder problems. Sports and moves are pretty bad, my wife was even commenting on it. I adjusted the blur and judder to 0, I have tried all different settings but nothing seems to help. Did you experience this?

        Reply

        • Chris
          February 27, 2017 at 7:47 am

          This is why you pick the M series over Samsung KU8000. Picture quality means nothing if you are distracted by judder and motion blur.

          Reply

  • Sean
    November 17, 2016 at 3:05 pm

    Anyone know how much worse the contrast is on the M60-D1?

    Want to buy, but worried I will be losing out with the IPS panel.

    Reply

  • Robert
    November 22, 2016 at 6:03 pm

    Hi Stephen, thanks for all the time and effort you take to do these reviews. Much appreciated!

    Which would you choose between the Samsung7000 series and the Vizio M series (50 inches).

    Thanks!

    Reply

  • Joe M.
    November 24, 2016 at 8:31 pm

    I want to upgrade my 8-10 year old 1080p 42″ Philips TV and i’m debating between this or the Samsung UN50KU6300FXZA. I know the M50-DI has a sort of HDR10 after a firmware update and the Samsung doesn’t. Which would you recommend?

    Reply

  • John
    January 3, 2017 at 10:30 pm

    I have the m70-d3 and am pleased with it except when I try and view a movie on vudu that’s uhd vudu informs me that my device will only play in hdx.

    I have all the latest firmware updates and my internet DL speed is well way over their 11mbps requirement but vudu insists my device only supports hdx. Also the m70-d3 is listed on vudus site list for tvs that support uhd from their service. Any ideas what I’m missing ?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      January 6, 2017 at 1:04 pm

      Hey there John. Have you had this problem with other 4K content from other apps such as Netflix? Also, is your TV connected to the web via Ethernet or only through WiFi? Connectivity via WiFi can be insufficient for 4K content streaming.

      Reply

      • John
        January 7, 2017 at 8:20 am

        I’m connected using WiFi via a netgear R8000 wireless router.

        The network speed test included on the m-70 d3 reports between 25 Mbps to 38 Mbps Haven’t tried using an Ethernet cable since its at least 30 ft. Between my tv and wireless router.

        4k hdr content will play fine wirelessly using another device using hdmi port 1.

        Perhaps a power line network adapter will give me better results ?

        Given vudu says 11Mbps is enough for hdr I would think my wireless speed would be enough.

        Or maybe it’s a vudu issue on their end.

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          January 8, 2017 at 1:13 pm

          Hey there John. What you’re describing sounds like a Vudu issue, possibly a failure to release 4K content in your area? (Where are you located?) or an inability to detect your internet connection speed correctly. Based on your descriptions of everything else, your TV seems like it should be fine, and the M-Series is indeed rated to display Vudu 4K content. I would however try testing the matter with an Ethernet cable just to see if this offers a round-about. They’re fairly cheap and 30 feet shouldn’t cost much at all.

          Reply

          • John
            January 9, 2017 at 8:53 am

            I’m located in Richmond Virginia in the United State’s. I appreciate your input and if the Ethernet cable does resolve the issue then I’ll just make a permanent run of it under my home.


  • Jason
    January 15, 2017 at 9:40 am

    Hey Stephen

    Loved your review. I purchased the m65-d0 and so far I am very happy with it. Only problem I’m having is when viewed from a bit of an angle I notice some vertical color difference. This is noticable when watching sports such as soccer or hockey where the TV is all one color. There are these two areas on one side of the TV where you notice a a darker shade of white when watching hockey and green when watching soccer. When viewed from the front it is not noticable. Is this something I should worry about? Do you think I should exchange the TV?

    Thank you
    Jason

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      March 19, 2017 at 6:30 am

      Hi there Jason. First, if you’re happy with your model and you don’t see any of these display quirks getting worse, you’re probably okay with sticking to the TV you have. All 4K TV displays will have their minor details that ruin the ideal of perfection we’d want for them and this is pretty much unavoidable, often even for the priciest TVs. And while I can’t speak for your specific unit since I haven’t seen it, VA TV panels like that found in the 65 inch M-Series will normally show off-color and contrast, as well as off-whites when viewed from an angle of more than maybe about 30 degrees. Even top-shelf VA panel TVs like the Samsung KS9800 have this issue and we’ve even seen it in the 2017 QLED TVs. So it’s no surprise to see it in the M-Series, which is indeed an otherwise very good TV.

      Reply

  • Sree
    January 23, 2017 at 10:57 pm

    Hey Stephen,

    I am torn. I have my heart set on the M-Series as they seem like a great price-to-value TV. I haven’t upgraded my TV in five years and and have a 720p Samsung Plasma (really liked it but developed burn-in). I found a great deal on the M55-D0 as well as the M60-D1. I was set on buying the M60-D1 because I felt like 60 inches was the right size. But that was before I found out that the M60-D1 uses a different IPS panel than all the other TVs in the the series. I keep reading that IPS has better color reproduction and viewing angles but that VA displays have way better blacks and contrast (and apparently contrast is one of the most important things). Assuming the price difference between the two TVs isn’t an issue which would you choose, the M55-D0 with the VA display or the M60-D1 with the IPS display? The sales on both of these TVs end soon so I have pull the trigger in a couple of days. Your recommendation would be greatly appreciated!!!!

    Thanks,

    Sree

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      January 30, 2017 at 8:59 pm

      Hello there Sree. I would definitely recommend the VA model over the IPS version. In terms of motion handling and all non-visual specs, both TVs should handle about equally well but for visual effects, IPS loses out badly to VA on two extremely crucial display quality specs. These are black level and contrast. Both are far superior in a VA panel TV and you almost certainly would prefer the picture quality because of them. In the 4K HDR TVs we’ve examined, IPS and VA generally perform about equally well but the contrast levels for IPS are much lower (as much as five-fold lower) and black depth is also consequently higher for IPS. The difference is notable. On the other hand, yes, IPS will deliver much better viewing angles, though VA isn’t nearly as bad at doing the same as some reviewers claim it to be. I own a Samsung 2016 HDR 4K TV with a VA panel and it looks quite decent even at reasonably wide viewing angles.

      Reply

  • Ralph Wills
    January 31, 2017 at 8:15 am

    My Vizio M65-D0 worked fine until the last firmware update. I have a 4K Blu-Ray connected to the monitor and bitstreamed though the monitor to a DTS compatible surround amp. The problem is since the last firmware upgrade, the monitor no longer passes the DTS signal to the surround system. When I called Vizio regarding this issue I initally got a runaround. The first rep didn’t even have a clue so I had to call back to speak to another rep. That rep told me that Vizio no longer supports DTS running through the HDMI cable. I have never heard of that since I own 2 other systems made up of other brands that don’t have that issue. I asked to speak to a supervisor who after putting me on hold for 10 minutes told me that the problem was a bad firmware update and that the “problem” would “probably” be fixed on the next firmware update coming “soon” which means that I can’t get surround from my Blu-Ray medium in surround rendering my home theater system virtually useless. I now have to sell the monitor at a loss in order to get a monitor that will pass DTS. The technical support at Vizio is terrible and I will never purchase another Vizio product again. The majority of Blu-Ray audio is in the DTS format and a $1500 monitor doesn’t support it? ridiculous.

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  • Robert Wellman
    February 11, 2017 at 9:09 pm

    Which do you think would be a better tv Vizio M65-D0 or a LG 70UH6350. Both are the same price right now at costco and I am torn between the two.

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    • Stephen
      Stephen
      March 9, 2017 at 4:44 pm

      Hey there Robert, Go for the Vizio M-Series. It’s a generally better performer than the low-end LG UH6350 and will deliver overall better black levels. LG’s LCD TVs are all IPS models with often terrible black performance, black level and contrast as well. These are crucial specs for high levels of visual quality. The Vizio M-Series also handles motion very nicely and is a great console gaming 4K TV.

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