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Sony X850C Review – 4K Ultra HD 120Hz 3D Smart LED TV – (XBR55X850C, XBR65X850C, XBR75X850C Series)

by on May 20, 2015
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Manufacture
Overview

Definitely one of Sony’s better 2014/2015 4K ultra HD TVs, the X850C may not have the sheer power of higher-end Sony TVs like the X900B and the even more prestigious X950B but it still does deliver the goods in home entertainment wonderfully. As far as major 4K TVs go, this particular model offers a comprehensive, powerful connectivity and visual technology package that will give your home entertainment center a powerful boost without breaking your budget.

While the X850C lacks certain newer Sony 4K TV features like Extended Dynamic Range and an upgraded panel, it still offers Triluminous Display, the new Android TV smart TV platform and full connectivity to a wide range of UHD content choices as well as a whole plethora of web apps for other entertainment media.

Overall while nowhere near the very best in the Sony lineup, the X850C delivers everything you need for a complete 4K home entertainment package and it does so at a very reasonable price. This is definitely one of the better choices among more economy minded ultra HD TVs.

The Good

The finer features of the X850C are numerous despite the lack of a few key advanced specs that only Sony’s latest TVs offer and overall this particular model is a thoroughly fleshed out package.

For starters, you get the benefit of the full deal in terms of connectivity. The XBR55X850C comes with full 4K connectivity that includes HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 compatibility, USB 3.0, HEVC/VP9 codec calibration and full internet access via WiFi and Ethernet. In this regard, Sony pretty much never fails its customers, whether the TVs in question are budget models or the latest and most advanced ultra HD TVs.

Additional digital interactivity features that come included in the X850C include the already mentioned Android TV, out-of-the-box access to Netflix and Amazon Prime Instant Video 4K content and complete compatibility with Sony’s own 4K media player, the FMP-X10. This last currently offers the world’s single largest library of premium UHD content for purchase or rent.

In terms of visual specs, the X850C is no slouch either. While it lacks some of the more razor fine detail of higher end models (particularly for darker scenes) and isn’t as vibrant in terms of contrast, the X850C does give you the benefit of Triluminous Display for much more varied color shades. Furthermore, both the 65 and 75 inch models include the beauty of full-array LED backlighting, though the 55 inch model only comes with Sony's edge-lit display illumination.

Furthermore, it includes Sony’s well known and very high quality X-Reality PRO upscaling engine for taking any sort of HD, Full HD and even SD content and turning it into something much closer to native 4K in terms of overall quality. In this regard, Sony has the experience of 10 years in developing upscaling technology going for them and it definitely shows.

Finally, the peripheral extras of the Sony XBR65X850C are pretty cool considering its price. These include a Voice search and control feature which lets you make essential commands by speaking to the TV and a connection to PlayStation Now, which let’s you bring PlayStation 3 games for streaming directly to the TV, where you can play them as long as you get your hands on a DUALSHOCK 4 controller which is unfortunately sold separately.


Check the Price of Sony X850C 4K Ultra HD 120Hz 3D Smart LED TV on Amazon:

4.1 - 142 Reviews

The bad

So what’s bad about the Sony XBR55X850C 4K TV? Quite frankly, not too much. Sony is no slouch when it comes to making 4K UHD TVs and even its more economical models pack plenty of punch. Thus, we can say with confidence that the X850C isn’t a bad TV by any conventional measure, it’s only inferior when compared to even better models that also cost a lot more.

For starters, the picture quality of the X850C doesn’t compare to what you’ll get with a Sony X950C or even an X900B. However, both of these are a bit or more pricey.

Furthermore, the contrast ratio of the X850C could use some more refinement and especially now that HDR content is on the way and ready to put all first generation 4K displays and content sources in the garbage bin in terms of visible quality.

Finally, we should also mention that this TV only offers an edge-lit LED backlight system. Our recently reviewed Vizio M-Series and P-Series 4K TVs cost a lot less than their Sony counterparts and even they can manage effective full-array LED backlighting. There’s no reason why Sony can’t start doing the same and offering a bit more real value to customers.

Final Thoughts

The Sony XBR65X850C is an excellent choice for a slightly more economical 4K TV that still offers all the fundamental connectivity and visual display technologies that will leave you mostly or possibly even completely satisfied. While truly awesome contrast range and display sharpness aren’t as good as they could be in the X850C, you’re still getting a great package that’s mostly worth its $1500 price tag.

Specs

• Screen size: 55 inch - XBR55X850C, 65 inch - XBR65X850C, 75 inch - XBR75X850C
• Smart TV: Yes
• HEVC (H.265) Included: Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes, X-Reality PRO upscaling engine
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 120Hz
• Screen Lighting: edge-lit LED backlighting (with full-array backlighting on 65 and 75 inch models)
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes WiFi, Blue Tooth, NFC and Ethernet port
• Remotes: One-flick remote, classical button remote
• Connectivity: 4 HDMI 2.0 ports, 1 MHL port 3 USB 2.0, component, Digital Audio out, Composite, Ethernet
• Dynamic Contrast Ratio: Over 1 million
• Audio: 10W + 10W down firing 2 channel speakers with S-Force Front Surround sound
• TV weight with/without stand: 46.3 lbs/43.9 lbs
• Dimensions: TV without stand: 48 3/4 x 28 1/2 x 2 3/8(13/16) in, TV with Stand: 48 3/4 x 30 x 8 3/4 in
• Processor: 4K Processor X1 Engine


Highlights

For starters, we can appreciate the fact that Sony hasn’t gone crazy over the curved screen design of many newer 4K TVs from Samsung and LG in particular. The absence of this is a highlight of the X850C. Off-angle viewing on this 4K TV is already only okay, so why make it worse by adding a concave curve?

Furthermore, as far as curved screen design goes in general, the biggest question when seeing it is “what’s the point?” It adds nothing serious in terms of visual quality on anything less than a truly enormous screen and more than anything it seems like an excuse to charge more for what are already fairly expensive ultra HD TVs. Luckily, Sony avoided this and stuck with the effective simplicity of flat screen technology.

Then there is the touch pad remote of the X850C, also called the one-flick remote. It’s nice, responsive as heck and very efficient for scrolling through the apps on the Android TV smart interface if you can get a grip of using the touch pad. Considering that there are over 100 apps on the Android TV interface, learning that touch pad will definitely come in handy. Furthermore, the remote control makes using the on-screen search keypad a lot easier than it would otherwise be.

Now, let’s cover an aspect of the X850C that’s both refreshingly new and wonderful in its functionality. This is the Android TV platform of the TV. Not only is it highly intuitive and well designed in terms of overall functionality, it also has what might be one of the best Voice Search capabilities we’ve heard of yet among newer 4K TVs.

This voice search works almost without any errors even in trying conditions that involve surrounding noise and the responsiveness of delivery of results is both excellent and highly accurate.

Additionally, the App and Smart TV functions of the Android TV system are generally great performers, especially when compared to the older Smart TV that Sony itself tried to develop and use on 2014 4K models. In this switch the company chose wisely. Google is definitely the better tech giant when it comes to intelligent content interaction systems and in the new TV OS, they have added interesting aspects like a menu loaded with Google Play options, easy access to other online Google-based accounts and the addition of Google Cast, which lets you show movies, shows, images and general programming from any iOS or Android device to the X850C’s much larger screen.

For those who also prefer the more classical approach to using their TV, the XBR55X850C also includes a typical button remote.


Check the Price of Sony X850C 4K Ultra HD 120Hz 3D Smart LED TV on Amazon:

4.1 - 142 Reviews

Visual Specs

Sony TV visual specs are as excellent as you could expect from a company so experienced in home entertainment technology. This applies almost equally to its highest end TVs and the more budget minded options. In this regard the X850C is no exception and its overall specs offer an excellent collection of visual technologies.

First of all, we have the obvious and usual 4K ultra HD resolution of 3840 x 2160 pixels, which while the same in most TVs in terms of pixel count can vary in terms of delivery quality. In the X850C, delivery of 4K is great, not superb because models like Sony’s own X950B give you even sharper UHD clarity but the X850C performs with typical Sony aplomb.

Next up, there is the Sony classic known as Triluminous Display. This technology has been in the company’s 4K TVs for some time and it basically offers a wider than average color gamut that comes from the same quantum dot nanocrystal technology that’s finally being put into Samsung and LG TVs. Sony has expertise in this and Triluminous-delivered wide color gamuts look fantastic in all of Sony’s 4K TVs. The addition to realism that Triluminous Display offers is wonderful to behold.

Finally, in terms of how well 4K content and regular HD content render on the X850C, Sony does a good job overall. The TV comes with a solid 120Hz native refresh rate, a dynamic contrast ratio of over 1 million and the internal X1 video processing engine guarantees that 4K content lows smoothly while HD and Full HD content gets upconverted superbly and without too much in the way of even light distortions. This upconversion of HD to something that looks like 4K resolution is a task Sony is better than anyone else on the market at delivering, so you won’t be disappointed.

Connectivity

The connectivity of the Sony X850C is up to the usual standards set by Sony in all of its 2014 and especially its 2015 UHD TVs.

You get the standard package of physical connectivity that includes 4 HDMI 2.0 ports, full HDCP 2.2 copy protection compatibility on all four of them, 3 USB 2.0 ports, Ethernet and WiFi internet connectivity to finish things off. There is also a MHL port and the X850C’s HDMI connections let you hook it up to a 4K PC at UHD resolution but only at 30Hz for most PCs.

As for virtual connectivity, the entire TV is one giant PC-like operating system/ smartphone interface thanks to its excellent Android TV platform. This gives you access to the entire TV compatible app landscape of Google Play, a full web browsing capability and streaming connections to all the best sources of free and pay-to-view streaming 4K content from Ultraflix, Netflix and Amazon Prime, among others. Because the X850C is HEVC and VP9 compression codec compatible, there won’t be any problems with any source of compressed streamed 4K content.

Pricing

The X850C is a well-priced piece of home entertainment technology for such a new and generally robust 4K TV with a very decently sized screen. The 55 inch XBR55X850C version is retailing for $1,395.00, 65 inch XBR65X850C is retailing for $2,198.00 and the 75 inch XBR75X850C is selling for $3,498.00.

Check the Price of Sony X850C 4K Ultra HD 120Hz 3D Smart LED TV on Amazon:

4.1 - 142 Reviews


Not so Great

To briefly summarize the very few less than ideal aspects of the XBR75X850C, it could definitely do better by also adding in Extended Dynamic Range technology like that found in more expensive and complete Sony 4K TVs. This would lead to a much sharper contrast and consequently better sharpness in darker scenes on the screen, which could definitely use a bit of improvement.

Most damning of all though is the fact that Sony still can’t bring itself to include full-array LED backlighting in even this newer, better 2015 4K TV. Vizio has been offering this much better backlighting technology since late 2014 in even its most affordable 4K TVs but for some reason a giant like Sony keeps going with edge-lid LED lighting for its lower-priced TVs. On this the Sony XBR65X850C fails.

Positives

• Excellent refresh rate
• Triluminous Display for excellent color rendering
• Great price
• Full connectivity package
• Wonderful access to 4K content
• Full array LED backlighting on 65 and 75 inch models

This TV also now comes with HDR enabled

Negatives

• No full-array LED backlighting on 55 inch model
• Somewhat poor contrast ratio
• Could easily be $200 cheaper

Editor Rating
 
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A-

 
Quality
A-

 
User Friendliness
A-

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
B+

Total Score
A-

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Bottom Line
 

The Sony XB455X850C is a great TV at a great price despite a couple of minor deficiencies. Overall, it would make an excellent introductory 4K home entertainment choice.

Check the Price of Sony X850C 4K Ultra HD 120Hz 3D Smart LED TV on Amazon:

4.1 - 142 Reviews

 
31 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • Matea
    November 1, 2015 at 8:20 pm

    Thanks for the review, but I see no mention of the 3D feature. What gives? I just got this model, and I am having trouble – Sony 3D glasses won’t connect. After doing some research, it seems like this was an issue for other consumers as well. Would have really appreciated a note about 3D in your lengthy review, it’s after all a 3D TV!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 2, 2015 at 11:56 pm

      Thanks for pointing this out Matea. We will keep 3D features in mind down the road for TV reviews, particularly for TVs which feature high quality 3D technology. We do sometimes neglect to mention the feature because it usually isn’t nearly as popular as other features like connectivity, access to 4K content, HDR, color etc, all of which we do have to cover in a limited content space.

      Reply

      • Chuck Kahn
        March 30, 2016 at 12:54 pm

        Yeah, you mention the Vizio as a better edge lit alternative for lower price but it’s not 3D so it’s an apples to oranges comparison.

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          March 31, 2016 at 9:47 pm

          Hello Chuck, this may be a valid point but 3D technology in 4K TVs is something quite a few users simply don’t care too much about so it really has little to do with descriptions and comparisons of other specs like screen brightness, price, backlighting technology and so forth. Vizio’s 4K TVs are steadily becoming more high-end as the company matures but the M-Series, while great for its price, is still a budget option for the essentials of a good 4K display experience, not so much for more complex technologies like active 3D, enhanced color or HDR.

          Reply

  • John
    November 4, 2015 at 3:41 pm

    Do the older black and white movies that TCM broadcasts through direct TV look excellent?

    Reply

  • Kris
    November 12, 2015 at 3:31 pm

    You mention in the review that the Sony 850C is edge-lit… only the 55″ version is. The 65″ and the 75″ are direct-lit. Not quite full array, but much better than just edge-lit. And the latest firmware update has added HDR support now.

    Reply

  • Kris
    November 12, 2015 at 3:31 pm

    You mention in the review that the Sony 850C is edge-lit… only the 55″ version is. The 65″ and the 75″ are direct-lit. Not quite full array, but much better than just edge-lit. And the latest firmware update has added HDR support now.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 13, 2015 at 3:59 pm

      Thanks for the spec notification Kris. We’d been expecting an HDR update to the X850C sooner or later and we’re glad to see that Sony finally got around to it.

      Reply

  • Dennis mcintyre
    November 13, 2015 at 11:30 am

    Sony X850C 4K tv 55″I would like your choice of have an apple instead of android software I got a Apple phone & Computer to communicate with tv

    Reply

  • Dennis mcintyre
    November 13, 2015 at 11:38 am

    I have a Sony 55X850C 4K Tv I would like to have a choice having a Apple product somewhere on my TVto communicate with my iPhone & Apple computer.

    Reply

  • preuser2
    November 24, 2015 at 8:41 am

    edit above :

    I wonder how the 55X850C stacks up to the better contrast on the 55X810C ?

    Reply

  • david
    December 6, 2015 at 5:51 pm

    my review: HD programming[TWC] looks good from 12 feet away, BUT when you view the screen from 3 feet away, the HD show [ex: Bourne Supremacy, recorded, playing it from DVR] you see pixelation, like small “+” signs an inch tall, made of the pixels forming every 6 inches or so. NOW, from 12 feet away, the scene is dynamic so you do not notice them, really. but i am ticked that they are there to begin with. i want dense, high res, super smooth. the truth is – 1080p played on this 4k tv, whether it is due to the upscaling algorithm, or perhaps 1080p is just not that clear from 3 feet away – it is disappointing. THAT SAID, here is my bottom line: i have tried some youtube 4k vids, usually things look good there [others would say WOW, but i am a high-res perfectionist]. now, it is connected to our wifi, 4.03 mbps download, 3.84 upload – this is low. so, i hear the image will look better with faster internet. the 4k videos have proven themselves so far, but the quality comes and goes due to internet speeds. so, the tv does perform. here is the bottom line: if you can try to squeeze as much internet bandwidth as you can, and enjoy 4k now and then, and since the 1080p shows look good enough, this tv is great at a discounted price. what’s the alternative, get the 1080p tv that cannot handle 4k for when you can get your hands on it, or be unable to output from your Mac or even your 4k video card whenever you want to use this tv as a monitor? i think we made a good choice. i just wish we had faster internet.

    Reply

  • T
    December 23, 2015 at 2:40 am

    Review needs a correction. 65″ and 75″ versions of this TV are not edge lit – they are direct lit.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 27, 2015 at 2:43 pm

      Hello T. You are correct and the specs have been updated to reflect the FA backlighting in the 65 and 75 inch models. The original review was done with an eye towards the smaller 55 inch model.

      thanks.

      Reply

  • pre user
    December 24, 2015 at 10:13 am

    The X850C is definitely a wide color gamut color on HDR 10 and P3 DCI content and when you set a wide color space on refular Bt709 content 2K or 4K

    The Sony XBR-55X7850C set here has good picture detail ,shadow detail good contrast / blacks ,the usually excellent Sony Color and great up scaling and gets plenty bright for most rooms .

    720p or 1080p up scaled to 4K – 20160p with the new Sony X-1 processor looks great and better than 720p /1080p respectively.

    With recent firmware updates the Sony 55X850C and the other X850C ‘s play Amazon Prime HDR & HDR bt2020 & P3 DCI demo downloads and 4K Y.T. WCG & 4K videos well .

    It automatically switches to HDR mode if it detects HDR 10 met data it has HDCP 2.2 & wideband HDMI 2.0a . It also has HDR user selectable HDR picture mode and P3 DCI and BT2.2020 color space modes .

    If you select bt 2020 or DCI color space in some of the picture modes like Standard orb Vivid or any that allow it and back the color down to 40 with regular bt709 content it makes the colors more vibrant and brings out the benefits of Triluminous panel lighting on regular content.
    Some will like that setting purists may not .

    It’s not 1000 or 600 Nits bright HDR like some of the other more expensive HDR ready sets but it’s otherwise not bad at all under controlled lighting and has a demonstrably better picture with good HDR content with more color and dynamic range across the board on HDR 10 WCG content .

    Reply

  • Aaron
    January 5, 2016 at 10:16 pm

    isnt there supposed to be a built in camera? it says on the box… how do i use it? i have the XBR55X850C model to be exact.

    Reply

  • b akarsh
    April 19, 2016 at 2:52 am

    hi when this tv is connected to a gaming pc with hdmi 2.0 cable or 1.4 cable

    the native resolution of the tv is shown as 1920×1080
    for a 4k tv the native res has to be 3,840 x 2,160 right ?

    and i also downloaded the app https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.finalwire.aida64

    even that app also shows the screen res as 1920×1080

    is this tv really a 4k tv

    is any one else facing the same problem??

    Reply

  • Michael
    April 21, 2016 at 6:58 pm

    How would you rate the HDR on this TV. Is it considered true HDR. Watching Marco Polo in HDR is great. I’ve read other articles and this TV doesn’t meet UHD standards. I’m still anxious to see other content in HDR.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 21, 2016 at 10:51 pm

      Hi there Michael. there is no one single “True HDR” for the most part. The definition of the spec is a bit variable and while the UHD Alliance specs and those of Dolby Vision are superior to what the X850C and many other 2015 HDR TVs offer, the HDR in the 2015 TVs is still HDR. And the 2016 standards for the technology are themselves subject to still further refinements down the road. Currently, the “Ultra HD Premium” specs of the UHD Alliance call mainly for 0.05 nits of black level and peak brightness at 1100 nits or more, combined with 10-bit color. Eventually, we’ll see peak brightness of more than 2,000 nits and color standards for 12 bits, which is far more than 10-bit color due to the exponential effect of adding those two bits. This too will be HDR just as 2015 and 2016 versions of HDR were the real thing. The important factors in HDR video are the number of stops of dynamic range (for which a certain high black level and a minimal high peak brightness are needed) and that color be 10-bit at least.

      Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 21, 2016 at 10:53 pm

      I should also note that the color coverage in the X850C is particularly good, with the already mentioned 10-bit color from my previous comment along with superb DCI-P3 color coverage that matches the best HDR LCD TVs of 2016 even. Peak brightness however isn’t so great. Samsung’s 4K TVs perform better at this.

      Reply

  • James
    May 12, 2016 at 5:51 pm

    Very disjointed overall review while showing the x8305c in the pics.
    The x8509c has an ANSI contrast of over 4000:1 which brings it up to the top of the pile regarding edge-lit LCD TVs.

    The HDR standard is HDR-10 for now at least. Dolby Vision is an extension of the current HDR standard.
    Most TVs support HDR-10 whereas only a handful in comparison, support Dolby Vision. LGD and Visio in USA only.
    Please allow something to mature before writing the root source off.

    Thanks.

    Reply

  • Zach
    June 21, 2016 at 5:55 am

    I’m thinking of getting the 55X850C, can someone please explain this sentence to me in more detail:

    “Furthermore, the contrast ratio of the X850C could use some more refinement and especially now that HDR content is on the way and ready to put all first generation 4K displays and content sources in the garbage bin in terms of visible quality.”

    Especially the part about the garbage bin… What does this mean? Is this something that Sony can fix with a firmware update to this TV, or will I have to get a new 4K TV with time for viewing HDR content?

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 21, 2016 at 12:29 pm

      Hello Zach, since i’m the one who wrote that piece of text, i’ll explain a bit better. At the time of that review, the X850C didn’t yet have the HDR update it received later in 2015. So that TV does in fact now offer HDR, though not the same quality of HDR as you’d find in some of the better high dynamic range 4K TVs of 2016, especially in terms of peak brightness and black level. However, the X850C does deliver superb HDR color coverage with wide color gamut and a high level of DCI-P3 cinematic color space rendition (about 95% of DCI-P3, which is good enough for HDR10 certification).

      As for my “garbage bin” comment. I may have been exercising a bit of hyperbole by saying that but my comment wasn’t too far off. Now that HDR has come to all major premium 4K TVs in 2015 and 2016 (and for the foreseeable future), the SDR displays of older 2013 and 2014 4K TVs don’t seem nearly as good as those of their new replacements, especially when theose 2015 and 2016 HDR TVs are displaying HDR content, which is what all 4K content will slowly convert to in the coming months and next couple of years. This doesn’t mean that a 2014 SDR 4K TV is bad, because it isn’t and it still often delivers great color, great contrast and superb sharpness along with other good features but it does mean that HDR 4K TVs and HDR 4K content are definitely the better home entertainment technologies now that they’ve arrived. The SDR 4K TVs of before have been left out of these new developments.

      Overall, this is a bit unfair to early adapters of 4K TV technology. They’re now getting punished indirectly for buying their TVs a bit too soon, though there is still plenty to appreciate in those older TVs.

      Reply

  • George
    September 12, 2016 at 1:13 pm

    Hey Steven, very nice review! I know that this is something that you probably already answered, but I’m just a little bit confused… I want to purchase this exact model to play with the newer ps4 console that is coming in November (ps4 pro) they say you need a 4k tv with HDR10… does this tv have HDR10 specifically? I see so many discussions about HDR, HDR10 and Dolby, I’m very confused about this… I’ll appreciate your help.

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 13, 2016 at 12:41 am

      Hi there George, yes the X850C supports HDR but doesn’t quite match the requirements of HDR10. This standard hadn’t yet been fully developed when the X850C came out and it can only be implemented via hardware changes, not just through a firmware update. Also, check out our HDR guide for more details on these standards and all things HDR-related. Of the 2015 Sony 4K TVs which are HDR10-compatible, I believe only the X930C and X940C made the grade.

      Reply

      • Chris
        October 19, 2016 at 1:41 pm

        Hi Stephen,

        In relation to George’s question, I too am going to be getting a PS4 pro and currently have the Sony 55x8500c. I’n you opinion, will I need to upgrade my TV to a “true” HDR set to really appreciate it or my TV will be perfectly fine at displaying the PS4 pro content and the difference in quality would not be significant enough to justify a new set?

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          October 19, 2016 at 7:01 pm

          Hey there Chris, the PS 4 Pro offers support for HDR10 standards, This generally means that content (gaming or movie/video content) encoded with them is formtted for more than 1000 nits of brightness, 0.02 nits of black level and for wide color gamut (90% DCI-P3 coverage or better) along with 10-bit color (or at least high quality simulated 10-bit color). That said, the Sony X850C won’t match those levels of HDR10 brightness and it won’t quite match the black levels either, but it will match the HDR color levels mentioned above and do so nearly as well as nearly any 2016 “true” HDR Sony or other TV. However, since none of the low-range to mid-range 2016 Sony HDR TVs match HDR10 black levels and peak brightness, if you’re thinking of upgrading to a model like the X850D, the difference will be small enough that there is no point in spending the extra money.

          The spending would only be worthwhile in terms of picture quality if you upgrade to a top-shelf TV from Sony like the X930D, X940D or new Z9D TVs, or to one of Samsung’s 2016 SUHD TV models. These will all offer pretty much the same color as the X850C and only marginally better blacks but they do deliver far superior dynamic range for contrast (higher peak brightness in particular)

          I hope that clarified the issue!

          Reply

  • Ty
    November 22, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    Would you choose this tv over the Samsung ku6300 series? I’m more so concerned about HDR and reliability

    Reply

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