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Sony X800D Review – 4K HDR TV – (XBR49X800D, XBR43X800D)

by on September 22, 2016
Details
 
Manufacture
Overview

Sony’s line of 2016 4K HDR TVs has turned out to be quite extensive and varied in its prices and qualities. After first releasing their initial series of high-priced (but not exorbitantly expensive) XBR-D TVs in the beginnings of 2016 in the form of the X930D, X900D, X850 D and “flagship” X940D models, which all featured high dynamic range, wide color gamut and a fresh new design, the company then further surprised tech watchers and consumers with their more economical but still HDR-capable mid 2016 releases of the X800D, X750D and X700D 4K models, which came out in a more limited range of sizes but at considerably more budget-oriented prices.

The X800D model we’re about to cover is essentially the top-shelf model among these new and more affordable 4K TVs, and while it’s not quite as good as its early 2016 predecessors, this fairly reasonably priced and rather smallish 4K TV model does come with some great display specs, very decent motion control and what we’d call an above-average overall performance for a lower range 4K TV from Sony. In a way, the X800D could be considered a successor to the excellent 2015 budget Sony 4K TV the X810C but in this model’s case you also get the benefit of powerful premium and new Sony technologies like HDR and Triluminos Display, both of which were absent in the budget 2015 4K home entertainment offerings from this brand.

Quite simply, for a budget 4K model, the X800D is most surprising in how close it comes to offering the same picture quality and performance caliber as its pricier premium cousins from the early 2016 Sony TV releases. For this, we respect the new model quite a lot.

We should also mention that the 49 inch version of the X800D comes with an IPS display panel instead of a VA panel. This shouldn't mean much difference in motion handling or color performance specs but it will mean a major difference in black levels and contrast, both of which will be about one third to 50% lower than they are in the VA model we're primarily referring to in the review below.

The Good

Despite being one of the cheaper TVs in Sony’s 2016 line of 4K televisions, the X800D is in general a very good compact home theater display and this is its single biggest benefit as a potential consumer choice. Basically, you won’t get shoddy quality for it despite the lower-tier status relative to its 4K Sony cousins. While that may seem like par for the course for a name brand TV it surprisingly enough isn’t quite so since both LG and Samsung have been known to put out lower-priced 4K models for both 2015 and 2016 which were not such good 4K TVs when compare to their pricier cousins in each respective brand. In the case of Sony, the discrepancy is basically much smaller and when compared to its counterparts from Samsung and LG in the same price range, the X800D outshines them almost across the board, particularly when compared to LG’s rarely very good LCD 4K TVs.

Secondly, we love the fact that despite its compact size and lower price, the X800D is in fact a near premium 4K TV in its specs and features, especially by the standards of Sony’s early 2016 4K HDR models and the company’s 2015 line of 4K HDR TVs. Not only does this TV offer a certain very decent (though partially limited but more on that further down) constellation of high dynamic range specs, it also offers formers more premium 4K television technologies for Sony models such as Triluminos Display color enhancement technology and status as a “Netflix Recommended” 4K UHD TV for viewing of the streaming service’s 4K high dynamic range and regular 4K UHD content sources. In fact, all of these are features which put the X800D well above the X810C, which was more or less this TV’s 2015 counterpart and which lacked even Triluminos Display and definitely didn’t offer wide color gamut or high dynamic range. In other words, for more or less the same price that the X810C sold at in 2015 (slightly less in fact) the X800D of 2016 offers an even more robust range of features and superior overall quality.

More specifically, the X800D is a superb performer when it comes to motion control specs in particular and we consider these to be its very strongest specs overall. The TV is excellent at handling motion blur despite a native refresh rate of only 60Hz, largely because Sony in general is talented at developing 4K TVs which perform admirably at motion specs even when they’re 60Hz models. In addition to the very good motion blur handling, with a very nicely fast response time of 13 milliseconds, the X800D also delivers decent (though not superb) 24p content playback for movie and other video sources which have been formatted at 24p. This applies to DVDs, Blu-rays, 4K Blu-rays and streaming content as well. There is some judder but it’s mild enough to be ignored after a bit of visual adjustment.

Finally, we love Sony’s design, connectivity and smart TV setup for the X800D and the rest of their 2016 TV models in general. This model offers a slim, fairly sleek and elegant looking built which, though a bit on the sharp-bodied side (as is common in Sony TVs) still manages to look nice in any living room. It’s a handsome looking TV for its size even if it doesn’t exactly have a real “Wow factor” to it. As for connectivity features, they consist of what are pretty much the standard and well-represented essentials of 4K TV connectivity in all modern 4K television models, with HDMI 2.0A, USB 3.0, LAN, WiFi connectivity and both digital and analog audio connections all present and accounted for. In other words, the X800D delivers what you’ll need and plenty of it, with no unpleasant surprises like a limited selection of HDMI ports (something we’ve noted in some LG TVs and Samsung’s 2016 KU-Series 4K TV models).

Android TV is installed in the X800D in its latest 2016 version and it’s as good as it ever was. In fact, we’d say that the smart platform performs even better than its 2015 version with a bit more functionality, ease-of-use and refinement. Furthermore, the selection of apps included in the smart OS right out of the box is robust and further improved by the possibility of selecting from many more media apps of all kinds through the Google Play store. The X800D comes with 4K content access through all the best apps like Netflix, Amazon Prie and Ultraflix while also offering special Sony TV-only 4K content offerings through the new Sony “Ultra” 4K content app which is only available to the company’s 2016 HDR TVs for now. As a final bonus of its Android TV smart platform, the X800D is fully Google Cast compatible, meaning that it lets you stream content from all compatible Android or iOS devices without special hardware. We should also note that Google Cast will soon be coming out with 4K content functionality and this will only serve to benefit owners of the X800D and other Sony 4K TVs even more.

Check the Sony X800D 4k HDR Ultra HD TV on Amazon

4.3 - 32 Reviews

The bad

As we said, the X800D is what we consider to be a very decent to great overall performer of a 4K TV but it does also come with its range of minor to moderate defect. However, considering its price and other benefits, we don’t consider any of these to be deal breakers in any way.

First of all and most notable, there is the black level performance of the X800D. It’s not terrible and nowhere near as bad as the black performance of LG’s 2014, 2015 and 2016 4K LCD TVS (even the HDR models!!) but it’s not nearly as good as the black performance we’ve seen in any of the 2016 Samsung 4K TVs, and this includes Samsung’s budget models in the entire KU-Series. Furthermore, when compared to any of its 2015 counterparts in Sony’s own line of 4K TVs (except the generally terrible X830C from last year, which was a display crapfest of a 4K TV) the X800D delivers notably inferior black levels. Specifically speaking, this model’s black uniformity could use a bit more smoothing out due to some minor clouding and the depth of maximum black level darkness is not as good as we’d like. It sits at about 0.028 cd/m2 and for an HDR TV the maximum permissible black level should be at least 0.020 cd/m2. for example, almost all offer black levels of 0.018 or lower for some truly deep, rich blacksSamsung’s 4K TVs, . That said, the X800D still delivers a very respectable contrast ratio when compared to some competitors, especially LG’s 4K TVs in the LCD ranges.

Secondly, the X800D offers no 3D technology of any kind. For many users this won’t be a problem at all if they’re not interested in 3D to begin with, but for those of you who do like playing around with 3D viewing, the lack of either active or even passive 3D in the X800D will possibly be a deal-breaker.

Additionally, the X800D messes up a bit on a couple of other core performance specs, though it only does so very slightly on some of them. These are its motion interpolation, local dimming and brightness capacities. As far as the motion interpolation is concerned, the X800D works quite well but in terms of judder control for 24p content, it could use a bit of improvement. Since it’s only a 60Hz 4K television, enhanced motion technology is rather limited and motion enhancement of particularly high-frame rate content in the 60Hz range is a bit problematic in this model. However, as we said, the X800D does generally handle motion blur and judder well, so the motion interpolation problem it has will be mostly minor except in cases where you’re viewing high-speed action sports content in native or upscaled 4K and want the smoothest, sharpest looking possible movements to appear on the screen.

Local dimming and peak brightness in the X800D are both on the weak side. In fact, the X800D offers no local dimming at all and this will affect the precision with which bright or dark objects are delineated in content. As for the TV’s peak brightness, it’s simply not that great and especially so for a so-called HDR 4K TV. Even in a 10% window of display space, peak brightness never breaks the 400 nit barrier and falls far below the minimums set out in HDR10 standards for high quality HDR TV display.

Finally, to close of our complaints section, we definitely recommend you buy an external sound system for the X800D if you want some robust audio power for your movies. The speakers on this 4K TV are okay for regular TV viewing at normal volumes but they distort badly at high volumes which you might want for some movies, and more complex sound technologies for surround sensation are totally absent.

Final Thoughts

Don’t’ be turned off by our largish listing of negative characteristics that the X800D suffers from. Most of them won’t at all be an issue for a majority of users and overall, for its price and size, the X800D is one very good and very robust 4K UHD HDR TV. It offers plenty of value for its price and at least in its size range, we’d recommend it more than any LG LCD 4K TV or any of Samsung’s non-SUHD TV models, without a doubt. We like the X800D on the whole.

Specs

• Screen size: 49 diagonal inches and 43 diagonal inches
• Smart TV: Android TV with Apps and Full Web Browser
• HEVC (H.265) Included: Yes
• VP9 Included. Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 60Hz native refresh rate
• Screen Lighting: Edge-lit LED backlighting
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes both built-in WiFi and Ethernet port
• Remotes: Sony button remote with voice recognition
• Connectivity: 4 HDMI 2.0a ports, 3 USB ports, 1 Ethernet port, 1 Component, 1 composite, 1 Audio Out, 1 Digital Audio Out
• Sound: 10 W+10 W
• Contrast Ratio: 3,882:1
• Black Level maximum: 0.028 cd/m2
• 3D Technology: none
• TV dimensions (box):
• 43 inch: 27.76 x 42.44 x 6.22 inches.
• 49 inch: 30.71 x 47.76 x 6.65 inches
• Processor: 4K Processor X1 Quad Core

Highlights

We partly love Sony’s X-tended Dynamic Range, or HDR capabilities. Colors are brilliant and the brightness levels are impressive. When this is coupled with Sony’s Triluminos technology, the result is even richer colors and unbelievable textures for a very natural picture. No, the HDR of the X800D isn’t up to par with HDR10 standards and it doesn’t match the high dynamic range specs of the more premium X900D, X930D and X940D 4K premium TVs or much less the specs of the new Z-Series Sony models (from what we’ve heard since we haven’t had a chance to review them yet) but for a TV in its price and size range, the X800D offers some superb color performance which at least covers a certain part of the display technology spectrum that falls under HDR. This alone is the most noteworthy highlight of this particular model.

4K X-Reality PRO is another highlight of the X800D. It analyses each pixel, and using an image database, adds contrast, detail and texture to every single frame of your content, whether the source is broadcast TV to low quality video streaming.

Google’s Android operating system also features as a feather in the X800D’s cap. It gives you unparalleled connectivity and access to content. It allows you to connect to the TV from mobile devices, stream content from Amazon Prime – with Netflix, Sony Ultra and with Google Cast coming soon – and functions as a gaming platform. The user-friendly platform also has a number of fun and useful tricks up its sleeve including advanced voice control. The remote control of the X800D is a basic button remote but it does come with voice recognition technology as a sort of nice added smart-tech touch. Furthermore, we note that in our overall analysis of smart TV platforms, we consider the Android TV platform of the Sony 4K TV line for 2016 and 2015 to be one of the best we’ve seen to-date. This is something we still consider to be the case for Android in the X800D, especially in terms of content access and assorted Google features for apps and web browsing support.

Finally, the X800D is a solid performer as a 4K TV for gaming and PC display use. We’ve seen superior performance from Samsung and Viziio models for 2016 but the X800D still gives them a run for their money in terms of its fairly low input lag of 33 milliseconds and its support for 1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4, 4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4, 4k @ 60Hz and 4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4.

Check the Sony X800D 4k HDR Ultra HD TV on Amazon

4.3 - 32 Reviews

Visual Specs

The visual specs of the X800D are generally very good even if they don’t stun like those of the Samsung 2016 SUHD TVs or Sony’s best 2016 models like the X940D or even more so, the new Z-Series top-shelf 4K TVs which are coming out in late 2016. In other words, this model delivers solid performance even though it comes with a few display flaws which are worth mentioning as well.

Starting with the essentials, the 43 inch X800D we're reviewing here is a Vertical Alignment (VA) panel 4K TV with moderate viewing angles and mid-level brightness that reaches up to a peak level of 381 cd/m2 or 381 nits. This is far below the peak brightness of the Samsung SUHD HDR TVs for 2016 and even for 2015 and it’s also far below the peak brightness of the best Sony HDR TVs for 2016 but it’s also not a bad brightness level for a 4K TV. However, by premium HDR standards of any kind, it’s severely lacking, especially when compared to a majority of 2016 4K TVs, most of which do come with some level of high dynamic range contrast built into their displays. On the other hand, the black level of the X800D is also not spectacular even though it’s fairly decent. Black level brightness sits at about 0.028 cd/m2 and while this is well above the maximum allowed by HDR10 standards (0.02 nits), it’s also respectable and better than what we’ve seen in LG’s HDR LCD TVs for this year, which deliver twice that level of brightness in their black level readings.

We should also mention that the 49 inch version of the X800D comes with an IPS display panel instead of a VA panel. This shouldn't mean much difference in motion handling or color performance specs but it will mean a major difference in black levels and contrast, both of which will be about one third to 50% lower than they are in the VA model we're refering to above.

Nonetheless, despite middling brightness and slightly over-bright black levels (by HDR standards), the X800D delivers a generally respectable contrast ratio of 3,882:1 and while we’ve seen far better in other LCD TVs like Samsung’s KS8000, KS9500 or any of the other 2016 SUHD models, the contrast of the X800D is perfectly good for dark room viewing and for most regular uses. We should however note that the X800d doesn’t offer local dimming of any kind and thus its precision coordination of zone specific brightening and darkening in onscreen content is definitely not that great and far inferior to what you’d find in a full-array 4K TV like the X940D from Sony.

As for color support, Sony’s X800D, X750D and X700D budget 4K HDR TV models come with HDR-quality 10-bit color support and it’s pretty much just as good as the color offered in the more pricey X850D – X940D 4K TVs which cost a fair bit more. The X800D also also offers very robust wide color gamut support for a DCI-P3 color space coverage of 96%. On top of this, due to this TV's 10-bit color, the model delivers 1.07 billion different color values. However, the colors on the X800D do look a bit more saturated than some might like (we suspect that this is due to the Triluminos Display working on the model) a bit of calibration of color settings can create a superb display performance in this area for movies, T shows and even assorted sources of upscaled non-HDR content.

Finally, arriving at the X800D’s motion handling capabilities, we can say that with very little exception, this model is a great performer. This is generally typical of all the Sony 4K TV’s we’ve reviewed between 2015 and 2016 and we even noticed great motion performance in the 2014 models which were some of this brand’s first 4K UHD TVs.

In any case, for a 4K TV with a native refresh rate of only 60Hz instead of the more usual 120Hz, the X800D delivers a small amount of judder instability on 4K UHD movie content in the 24p format but even here, the effect is minor and unless you’re sensitive to the movement, it shouldn’t affect movie viewing performance. Other key movie and TV viewing specs like motion blur control are superb and all the more impressive for being this good in a 60Hz TV. With a response time of 13 milliseconds, the X800D delivers very low motion blur and this can be further reduced by activating Sony’s MotionFlow technology though a slight soap opera effect is created by doing this (however it’s lesser than we’ve seen it in many 120Hz TVs of a higher price range). Motion interpolation technology in the X800D is also very robust and offers motion enhancement for content that flows at both 30Hz up to 60Hz, for the obvious reason that this is a 60Hz TV. However, since the X800D does deliver great motion blur control, the lack of high level motion interpolation shouldn’t be a problem.

Finally, as for the upscaling engine in the X800D, it’s as good as we’ve seen it in all other major Sony 4K TVs. This spec pretty much seems to stay solid across the spectrum of Sony TVs regardless of pricing and is quite superb, with particularly grat upscaling of Full HD content and streamed 4K content sources. It also upscales 720p video sources wonderfully in most cases.

Connectivity

Connectivity-wise, the Sony X800D offers all of the same robust and modern specs that the rest of the Sony 2016 4K TVs come with. These include both WiFi and the usual component of:
• 4 HDMI 2.0/2.0a ports
• 3 USB 3.0 ports
• 1 Digital Optical Audio Port
• 1 Analog audio port for 3.5mm jacks
• 2 component In ports
• 1 composite in Port
• 1 Tuner
• I Ethernet slot
• 1 IR In port

Pricing

The 49 inch model of the X800D sells on Amazon for a retail price of $798.00 as of this writing and the X800D 43 inch model is even more reasonable priced at $648.00. We consider both of these to be great prices for a 4K TV of such decent general specs and robust HDR support.

Check the Sony X800D 4k HDR Ultra HD TV on Amazon

4.3 - 32 Reviews


Not so Great

To summarize briefly the rather mild defects of the X800D. We argue that its worst attributes come in the form of its poor internal audio support, it’s weak peak brightness, a lack of high performance motion interpolation and the fact that this 4K TV doesn’t come in larger sizes. The small dimensions make it a great budget TV with serious kick but We’d love to see a reasonably priced 55 inch model on offer at least. The X750D, which is the next down in this series of budget HDR TVs is still more affordable and similar and does come in larger versions, but it has certain key defects which the X800D lacks.

Positives

• Very good motion handling specs
• Superb color performance
• Excellent, content-rich Android TV platform
• Affordably priced
• Decent HDR color specs
• Fast performance

Negatives

• Not the best peak brightness
• Refresh rate capped at 60Hz
• Weak audio performance
• No larger size models beyond 49 inches
• VA display technology produces weak viewing angles

Editor Rating
 
Features
A-

 
Quality
A-

 
User Friendliness
A

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
A

Total Score
A-

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User Rating
 
Features
B

 
Quality
B+

 
User Friendliness
B+

 
Connectivity
B+

 
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Bottom Line
 

We have to say that we love the X800D. It’s a nicely priced and generally very good 4K TV for those looking for a starter model with high dynamic range and many of Sony’s other premium and genuinely great television technologies. We’d even argue that it offers better value than the 50 inch P-Series from Vizio even though the latter model delivers far superior contrast, peak brightness and black levels.

Check the Sony X800D 4k HDR Ultra HD TV on Amazon

4.3 - 32 Reviews

 
66 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • Ty
    September 22, 2016 at 5:34 am

    Im currently deciding between this TV and the KU7000 samsung model, with price not a factor could you decide between these two TV’s? from what i’ve gathered the samsung offers much better blacks and the Sony offers better motion blur.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 23, 2016 at 10:16 am

      Hey there Ty. Overall, I’d recommend the Sony X800D. The Samsung TV does indeed offer better contrast and deeper blacks but those of the Sony are also quite good. Furthermore, the Sony model offers both Wide color gamut AND 10-bit color while the KU7000 only offers wide color gamut but only 8-bit color. The difference between 8-bit color and 10-bit color is quite large, with much better smoothness in the 10-bit version. Additionally, the motion control specs of the X800D are way better than those of the KU7000. Basically, you can weigh things as follows: Modestly better black level/contrast with the KU7000 or nearly as good black level for the X800D but with much better color and motion control specs and better connectivity. The Sony wins the weigh-in.

      Reply

      • Chris
        November 14, 2016 at 3:29 am

        Hello, while were on the same subject what would you recommend for gaming and watching 4k content both streamed and through blu ray. I need your honest opinion im stuck between the 2 the samsung KU7000 in 40″ or the sony X800D in 43″ this tv will mostly my gaming tv, therefore I do not want a large tv (I Play a lot of shooters and don’t like the idea of having a huge gun spread across the screen)

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          November 15, 2016 at 9:40 am

          Hi there Chris, Go for the KU7000. Samsung’s 4K TVs for 2016, both the KU-Series models and the SUHD TVs are all pretty much uniformly excellent for their display specs, just like Sony’s 2016 TVs like the X800D. However, the Samsung models all offer slightly better specs for gaming in 4K, HDR and gaming with the newest consoles like the PS4 Pro. This is mainly because Samsung’s TVs offer much better input lag rates when HDR gaming is activated. The X800D from Sony doesn’t do a bad job of this but the KU7000 performs quit a bit better, with an input lag for gaming of about 21 milliseconds compared to the Sony’s 31 milliseconds.

          Both TVs are similar in their display specs and HDR quality for watching movies, though we prefer the overall motion handling of the X800D. and unlike the KU7000, it offers 24p content playback, which might be important for watching movies if you’re sensitive to judder. In basic terms, the Samsung TV is the better choice for gaming, while the Sony TV is a bit better for movies, streaming content etc, so choose based on which activity you’ll be doing more.

          Reply

          • Josh
            November 16, 2016 at 4:34 pm

            I’m also comparing the 43″ Samsung KU7000 and the 43″ Sony X800D Which one would work best as a PC Display? Coding and reading text is the most important aspect to me.


          • Stephen
            Stephen
            November 18, 2016 at 12:30 am

            Hey there Josh, I’d say that you’re best off with the KU7000. It’s sharper black levels, higher peak brightness (slightly) and better overall contrast will help in particular with coding and text related work. Also, the KU7000 supports the following resolutions:
            1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
            4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
            4k @ 60Hz
            4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4

            The X800D supports the same resolution settings for HDMI-based PC connectivity but the contrast, peak brightness and black levels are a bit weaker.


  • Erik
    September 22, 2016 at 1:34 pm

    Was skimming over the review, but which model did you review, the 49 or 43? There’s some discrepancies about whether or not the 49 inch is a IPS and this could lead to some issues like the black levels and such.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 23, 2016 at 3:32 am

      Hey there Erik, we reviewed the 43 inch model, which definitely has a VA panel, as you can see by its contrast level. As far as we know, the X800D 49 inch TV also uses VA display technology for a similar contrast level and black performance as the model covered in our review. The review can basically be said to comprehensively cover both models.

      Reply

  • Clay
    September 23, 2016 at 10:37 am

    I may be missing it in the review, but do you guys give out your ideal picture settings for this tv. I have owned the 49″ version of this tv for a week and I’ve been tinkering with the settings on a nightly basis. I was curious how you guys ended up setting it.

    Thanks,

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 26, 2016 at 7:37 pm

      Hi there Clay, I’d recommend you tinker with the settings as a genral rule depending on what you’re most using the TV for but for some decent settings such as those we would use. the following are a few suggestions: Set the Picture mode to “Custom” for movie and TV watching, then set the brightness to 1 for ideal performance in a darker room. You can however adjust this upward as needed. In the advanced settings, set contrast to its maximum level and I’d also suggest going for a warmer picture by setting the color temperature to “Expert 1”. Additionally, shut off “Live Color” under the color settings in the advanced settings menu. This will create better overall color accuracy for content source formatting. Finally, I’d suggest leaving “Motionflow” off for normal movie content, unless you don’t mind the odd effect it creates. However, you can turn it on for motion improvements in gaming and sportscasts.

      Reply

  • Matt
    September 25, 2016 at 4:32 pm

    Hi very good review!! It helped to the point where i just bought the 49x800d!! :). I use it for video games on PS4 and soon PS4 Pro. My question is concerning the difference, in the tv picture settings, between “gaming” and “cinema pro”. Cinema Pro gives me acces to more Motion Flow options than Gaming setting and the end results is way better on Cinema Pro for motion handling in my opinion. So what is the advantage of “Gaming” Picture Setting VS the other picture settings ? Thank you again.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 26, 2016 at 7:29 pm

      Hi Matt, the Gaming setting is particularly designed for console gaming. If this is something you do, I’d suggest giving it a try. However, the game setting is also mostly fine for movie watching and content viewing as well.

      Reply

  • Nguyen
    September 26, 2016 at 12:34 am

    Can you please tell me which TV I should buy between sony 49x800d and 50w800c? While the 49x800d has 4k resolution and new techniques of 2016, the 50w800c is supported 3D and has 120hz panel. My needs are just watching movies, thank you so much.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 26, 2016 at 7:40 pm

      Hey there Nguyen. I unfortunately don’t know which model the 50W800C is so I can’t speak for it but I can tell you that the X800D offers excellent display specs, some very decent brightness, full HDR color (wide color gamut and 10-bit color) and is also a great performer on motion control specs despite its 60Hz panel. The TV is unlikely to disappoint you in all of these regards. Sony is generally great at delivering solid motion handling even in its 60Hz TVs so don’t let the native 120Hz refresh influence you too much in this case.

      Reply

  • Yasmine
    September 26, 2016 at 2:04 am

    There have been 49 inch panels confirmed to be ips on the avs forum’s official thread of this tv. That has lead to some discussion on whether the 49 inch version suffers from panel lottery. It seems to me to be too important a feature to not definitively know. Could you test out the panel yourself and/or talk to Sony to confirm the panel type? Much thanks!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 26, 2016 at 7:31 pm

      As we had already said in previous comments, the X800D model we reviewed was the 43 inch model and it definitely had a VA display, as can be seen from its powerful black performance and high contrast. We know that the X800D 49 inche version comes with VA panel models as well but we can’t speak for IPS versions since we didn’t check on those. If you’re looking to buy one and can get a chance to see its display in a showroom, the depth of black should give you some idea of whether it’s IPS or VA. VA panels tend to offer 3 or 4 times stronger contrast.

      Reply

  • Nguyen
    September 27, 2016 at 12:55 pm

    Sr, can you help me compare sony x700d and x800d? Because I see the specs of two TV are similar but the x700d is much cheaper. Thank you.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 3, 2016 at 8:57 am

      Hello there Nguyen, the X800D Sony TV is the better model. It delivers better motion control, superior color performance and comes with a somewhat higher quality of black performance, which is crucial the a high quality 4K TV display experience. The price difference between the two isn’t too large so I’d suggest the X800D as the better choice overall.

      Reply

  • Vizueto
    October 11, 2016 at 4:22 pm

    Hello, I am buying a TV very soon, but I can’t decide if X800D or X850D, can you help me, Movies, games HDR. Thanks..

    Reply

  • Matt
    October 12, 2016 at 3:03 pm

    I had a question on the 49 inch. If it is indeed an IPS panel would that affect the input lag? Is there a difference between VA panels and IPS panels when it comes to input lag? Thanks for your review!

    Reply

  • Matthew
    October 18, 2016 at 4:50 pm

    Im currently deciding between the 43″ x800d and the 40″ KU6300 for ps4 gaming and watching sports. Based on this and several reviews, it seems the x800d is a better choice because of its HDR, and lack of it on the KU6300. Could you add your 2 cents on which you feel would be best suited for me?

    Reply

  • Fabio
    October 20, 2016 at 7:17 am

    Does the Sony 49x800d supports HDR10, as it will be required on the PS4 PRO?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 20, 2016 at 8:52 am

      Hello there Fabio, yes it does. So does the Sony X700D and the Sony X750D in case you’re curious. Even the majority of non-HDR 4K TVs for 2016 and many from 2015 support HDR10 at least in the sense that they can read the metadata, though they can’t reproduce the HDR aspects of content.

      And yes, the PS 4 Pro is HDR10, as are all Sony products for now.

      Reply

  • shaheed
    October 26, 2016 at 12:19 am

    I just got this tv a few days ago from best buy. I have the 49″ model. What are the best calibration settings? I am PS4 gamer and I watch movies and anime. I am getting the PS4 Pro next month. Is it worth it getting it professionally calibrated. Best buy will do it for $250.

    Reply

  • Jason Jenkins
    October 28, 2016 at 3:29 am

    Does anyone known UK model? I can’t find this TV anywhere.

    Reply

  • Abdullah
    October 29, 2016 at 7:56 am

    Hey man hope you’re going to reply. I am trying to decide between the X800D, KU7000 and the X700D. i read some of your comments which tell me that the X800D is the better option. But am worried about the size being 43 inch while i sit 6 to 8 feet away from the TV. would you recommend this tv to me in this case ? And i can’t afford the 49inch X800D.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 29, 2016 at 2:39 pm

      Hello again Abdullah, As I’d said in my previous response to your other comment, the distance you mention for a 43 inch model should be perfectly decent for your viewing needs, especially if you lean more towards 6 feet and among these TVs, yes the better option is the X800D TV, though Samsung’s KU7000 isn’t too bad either and actually offers slightly better black level performance. However, we prefer the motion control specs of the X800D and think it offers better color rendering.

      Reply

  • Abdullah
    October 29, 2016 at 9:22 am

    Would you recommend the 43Inch X800D for someone who usually sits 6 to 8 feet away from the TV? I can’t afford the bigger models

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 29, 2016 at 2:37 pm

      Hello Abdullah, Yes I would, 6 to 8 feet is good enough for decent TV watching on a 43 inch 4K TV and as I covered in my review, the X800D is actually one very good low-cost 4K HDR television with some great motion control specs, great color performance and very decent black levels, all of which are crucial aspects of high quality display in a UHD TV.

      Reply

  • Gaston
    November 1, 2016 at 6:19 pm

    Hello Stephen

    Do you know if the Sony X800D (or any other Sony TV for that matter) supports MKV movies playing from USB (together with .srt subtitles)?
    I have this idea that Sony TV’s don’t support this, but maybe you know for sure.

    Thank you, and congratulations for the review.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 1, 2016 at 8:28 pm

      Hello Gaston, we actually haven’t ever tried this with MKV movies from a USB source for the X800D itself but we’ve seen it work in other Sony 4K TVs, so it should be fine in your unit. Additionally, as the specs of the X800D themselves state, it supports MKV:

      “Supported Video Formats 3GPP, AVCHD, TS, WMV, WebM, AVI, MKV, MOV, MP4, MPEG-1, MPEG-2, Motion-JPEG, PS”

      Furthermore, a couple things to keep in mind. First, make sure that the external drive that you connect is formatted to the Fat32 format if its an HD unit and also make sure that your TV has the latest software/firmware updates at work in it, just in case. Here is Sony’s site for these.

      Reply

  • Pete
    November 7, 2016 at 9:32 am

    I can’t find this model in the UK. I’m a bit confused by all the different model numbers. Please could you tell me which on it is on amazon? These are the ones I found:
    Sony KD49XD8088
    Sony KD49XD8077
    Sony KD-49X8305C
    Sony KD-49X8005C

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 18, 2016 at 12:55 pm

      Hello Pet, quite frankly im not sure, we focus mainly on U.S and North American model numbers. And even if I could identify which model the X800D might be closest to, some of the internal performance specs could be quite different. It’s hard to say without review.

      Reply

  • Matt
    November 14, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    Hi, concerning HDR Settings for Sony X800D i know you said to put it on “automatic”. But when you turn HDR on “on” the color and contrast are more vibrant than on “automatic” even when receiving an HDR signal from my PS4 Pro.

    Why the difference when set “on” compare to “automatic” for the Sony x800D?

    Thank you very much

    Reply

  • Paul Morgan
    November 16, 2016 at 4:51 am

    Hello Stephen… thanks so much for the very good comprehensive review …considering I am getting older, it is sometimes hard for an old codger like myself to keep up with all the new technologies. I am a pensioner, not much $$ in the old bank account so decided to purchase the X800D 49 “… I await delivery and have been heartened by your review which overall is very good considering my purchasing capacity.
    I need some advice… could you recommend a reasonable sound bar to tag along with my new TV… again…something you think overall is good value for money.
    Many thanks, buddy.
    Regards
    Paulo

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 18, 2016 at 1:32 am

      Hello Paul Morgan. Hahaha. It can sometimes even be tricky for younger guys like me to keep up with all the new technologies, features and jargon that emerge t lest twice a year in this industry, and I do this professionally day in and day out. Don’t feel too bad about it yourself.

      Now, as for your question. One solid model I’d recommend and especially in this case because it also belongs to Sony and thus should create the least installation friction, is this bar. A bit pricey but highly rated. You said you’d prefer to keep to a tight budget, so I can’t be sure what exactly that is, but hope this suggestion is reasonable.

      Also, for installation details, please check out this guide from Sony itself. (We’re still working on a 4K TV audio guide)

      Reply

  • JAY
    November 18, 2016 at 8:22 am

    The 49 inch actually uses an IPS panel while the 43″ uses a VA panel… This means that the 49 inch will produce lower contrast than its little brother. Best Buy said that the 49 inch uses an IPS display for better viewing angles in larger rooms. rtings.com also confirmed that the 49 inch uses an IPS panel.

    You may want to correct that in the review.

    Reply

  • Clint
    November 19, 2016 at 4:32 am

    I picked up the XBR-43X800D about a week or so ago from best buy. I’ve been really satisfied with it. I am someone who has worked in Television production, so naturally am picky about content reproduction. This TV does a really good job.

    Typically I wouldn’t buy LCD if OLED or Plasma sets were available in the smaller screen sizes and 4k.

    I have a 42″ Panasonic Plasma in the bedroom which is a 2009 model and that’s usually what I make my LCD comparisons to in determining if I can live with the display. the sony TV actually looks like it might be better then the plasma for some things since it’s newer tech. The Plasma is a full HD display 1080p model TC-P42U1 From my experience, It’s harder to find the higher end TVs in a smaller size. Most seem to be larger. The other thing is, I really don’t fully trust samsung quality. I had two displays die on me in under a year and there warranty policy wasn’t the greatest. I will say I am willing to give them a chance again now, and have a couple curved displays for my computers. I’ll see how they do before investing in samsung for something expensive like a TV.

    If I were to rate my satisfaction with products I would do it as follows;
    Apple
    Sony
    Panasonic
    and Samsung at the bottom

    UHD blu-ray also looks great on the sony. bought an Xbox one S for the player upgrade, also have a Roku Premiere+ and a cable box connected all by HDMI. Everything looks great even non HD source.

    Reply

  • Eric
    November 26, 2016 at 9:26 am

    I currently own a ku6300 (Samsung ) and am trying to see if the 49 inch x800d is a worthy upgrade. Primarily used for HDR gaming, will the decrease in contrast ratio truly be a deal breaker? The tv will be used in a primarily well lit area. Main reasoning for the upgrade is reduction in motion and the full HDR capability, alongside somewhat better judder during movies in off time. Thanks for the detailed review.

    Reply

  • John
    November 29, 2016 at 3:15 am

    I am also curious as to whether the x800d is worth the extra pay. I am looking at both 43″ for the Samsung ku6300 and Sony x800d, and the ku6300 would be about $150 less. Is it worth the difference?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 5, 2016 at 6:13 am

      Hey there John. Yes, the 43 inch X800D is worth the extra money. It’s a genuinely superior 4K TV to the KU6300 and mainly because it offers full HDR color by including wide color gamut. The KS6300 only offers 10-bit color instead of both of these core aspects of HDR color performance. Thus, the X800D will deliver a richer, more realistic and more saturated experience if you use it to wath high dynamic range 4K content from Blu-ray discs or streaming services like Netflix. Aside from this, the X800D offers 24p movie playback support. The KU6300 does not.

      Reply

  • marc
    December 5, 2016 at 6:32 pm

    John I would not upgrade if you already have the 6300. The samsung is a pretty good package, and has very good contrast. While the sony 43 inch is also a VA panel, it does not have as good contrast. The sony might be better for hdr and color, but i dont think its going to be much of an upgrade for you at all. I am betting there will be good changes in hdr performance across the board in 2017 models that will work their way into the mid-level and entry level big brands – we will find out over the next couple of months. If you have space, I would wait and get a bigger tv so you can really take advantage of 4K.

    Reply

  • Kris
    December 13, 2016 at 2:39 am

    Can you recommend any other models with Wide Color Gamut on the same price range? Thanks..

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 14, 2016 at 11:31 am

      Hey there Kris, For WCG models in roughly the same price range, two that i’d particularly recommend are the Samsung KU7000 or its curved KU7500 version and, even more so, the 50 inch Vizio P-Series 4K HDR TV, which offers dual HDR support for both Dobly Vision and HDR10 while offering superb local dimming and great motion handling. It costs less than $900.

      Reply

  • Alok
    December 23, 2016 at 6:19 pm

    Comparison between the 49x800d and the 55x850d? Only use is regular TV / Movies including 4K content. No gaming etc. 850d has the X11 processor and the triluminous display but again unless it makes a huge difference I can live with it.

    Reply

  • Zisis
    December 31, 2016 at 5:52 pm

    Hello. I want to buy sony 43xd8005. Is the equal model in europe. Iam from Greece. I am wondering about motion. Because one buyer from amazon de wrote on his review: Tolles Bild aber 50 hz nicht ausreichend
    ByStefanon 19 December 2016
    Habe das Gerät offline erworben und möchte hier nun auch meine Erfahrungen teilen!

    Vor- und Nachteile:
    + tolles Bild (sowohl bei TV/Netflix/Amazon als auch als PC-Monitor)
    + harmonische Farben
    + sehr gute Ausleuchtung (war wohl ein Glücksfall)
    + Sound ist für einen Flat TV ganz gut
    + sehr gute Verarbeitung
    + Designaspekt schlicht und einfach
    + Bedienung einfach

    – 50 hz leider zu schwach für schnelle Bewegungen trotz Motionflow (zittriges und unruhiges Bild)
    – Reaktionen des TVs manchmal sehr träge
    – Umschaltzeiten der TV-Sender bei DVB-C sind recht lange (3 Sek)
    – ab und zu konnte sich der TV nicht mit dem WLAN verbinden

    Trotz der überwiegend positiven Anmerkungen habe ich den TV wieder zurück gegeben da ich mit dem unruhigen Bild auf dem 50 hz Panel nicht zurecht kam. Ganz schlimm war das Bild bei TV-Serien wie Modern Family die generell schon eine unruhigere Aufnahme haben, dies aber bei 100 hz das Gesamtbild nicht so unruhig darstellen lässt. Und ja… Hersteller werben gerne mit 2000 hz und dergleichen, aber der Unterschied von 50 auf 100 hz ist wesentlich deutlicher erkennbar als von 100 auf 200 hz (nativ).

    Nichts desto trotz kann ich diesen TV dennoch empfehlen solange man den Abstrich eines 100 hz Panels verschmerzen kann. Modell XD8305 hat ein 100 hz Panel, ist aber in AT und online leider nur selten vorrätig. Ich habe mich letztendlich für einen teureren Panasonic der Referenzklasse im Fachmarkt entschieden. Here the translation : I bought the device offline and would like to share my experiences!

    Advantages and disadvantages:
    + Great picture (both TV / Netflix / Amazon and PC monitor)
    + Harmonious colors
    + Very good lighting (was probably a luck)
    + Sound is quite good for a flat TV
    + Very good workmanship
    + Design as simple and simple
    + Easy operation

    – 50 hz unfortunately too weak for fast movements despite motion flow (shaky and uneasy picture)
    – Reactions of the TV sometimes very sluggish
    – Switching times of the TV stations with DVB-C are quite long (3 sec)
    – from time to time the TV could not connect to the WLAN

    Despite the overwhelmingly positive comments, I have the TV back given back because I was not able to cope with the restless picture on the 50 hz panel. Quite bad was the picture with TV series like Modern Family which generally have a more uneasy recording, but this at 100 hz the overall picture is not so uneasy. And yes … Manufacturers like to advertise with 2000 hz and the like, but the difference from 50 to 100 hz is much more clearly recognizable than from 100 to 200 hz (native).

    Nevertheless, I can still recommend this TV as long as you can smear the smear of a 100 hz panel. Model XD8305 has a 100 hz panel, but is available in AT and online unfortunately rarely. I finally decided for a more expensive Panasonic of the reference class in the specialist market.
    II bought the device offline and would like to share my experiences!

    Advantages and disadvantages:
    + Great picture (both TV / Netflix / Amazon and PC monitor)
    + Harmonious colors
    + Very good lighting (was probably a luck)
    + Sound is quite good for a flat TV
    + Very good workmanship
    + Design as simple and simple
    + Easy operation

    – 50 hz unfortunately too weak for fast movements despite motion flow (shaky and uneasy picture)
    – Reactions of the TV sometimes very sluggish
    – Switching times of the TV stations with DVB-C are quite long (3 sec)
    – from time to time the TV could not connect to the WLAN

    Despite the overwhelmingly positive comments, I have the TV back given back because I was not able to cope with the restless picture on the 50 hz panel. Quite bad was the picture with TV series like Modern Family which generally have a more uneasy recording, but this at 100 hz the overall picture is not so uneasy. And yes … Manufacturers like to advertise with 2000 hz and the like, but the difference from 50 to 100 hz is much more clearly recognizable than from 100 to 200 hz (native).

    Nevertheless, I can still recommend this TV as long as you can smear the smear of a 100 hz panel. Model XD8305 has a 100 hz panel, but is available in AT and online unfortunately rarely. I finally decided for a more expensive Panasonic of the reference class in the specialist market.

    I need your advise. Thank you

    Reply

  • mike
    January 14, 2017 at 8:34 am

    hello.
    thank you for your great web site, it help a lot.
    I’m stuck between choosing these cvs for just gaming with ps4 pro and movie.
    LG 49UH850v
    samsung 49KU7500
    sony 43X800D
    wich on you recommended and its best pick for me.
    i do thank you for your time.
    best regards.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      March 19, 2017 at 6:43 am

      Hi there Mike, the model I’d most recommend is probably the KU7500. It definitely offers the best input lag of all three choices you’re presenting and it also delivers great color, contrast and black performance. It furthermore has a nicely bright panel for decent basic HDR performance, which would be useful for HDR gaming in your PS4 Pro. Most of all however, the low input lag of this and all 2016 Samsung 4K TVs for 4K and HDR console gaming in Game Mode is what makes me prefer this model so much. The LG model isn’t nearly as good for 4K console gaming due to its higher input lag and its IPS display panel spoils black levels a bit. As second choice I’d recommend the Sony model, it’s console gaming input lag is good and it’s a great TV for motion handling in movies and streaming content. However, 49 inches are definitely better than 43 inches for a 4K TV.

      Reply

  • james turner
    January 14, 2017 at 8:52 am

    no mention of the banding problems most people are experiencing with this model. all over the uk dedicated xd80 forum and us xd800 forums. makes you wonder …..

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      March 19, 2017 at 6:34 am

      I assume you’re referring to the typical color banding that occurs with 8-bit color content on many 4K TVs and is basically unavoidable if you’re not watching 10-bit HDR video. That said, yes, the X800D suffers from a bit of banding in some colors even at 10-bit but it was very minor from what we’ve seen.

      Reply

  • greg
    January 31, 2017 at 8:23 pm

    How would this TV compare with a computer monitor? Is it safe(radiation or glare etc..) and or comfortable to sit so close to a panel designed to be a TV? Or is a large monitor better? The TV features seem to make it attractive.. Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      January 31, 2017 at 9:26 pm

      Hello Greg, the Sony X800D, and especially the 43 inch model we review here would make an absolutely superb PC monitor for almost any type of use. It widely supports different input types for PC use, such as the following:
      1080p @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4
      1080p @ 120Hz
      4k @ 30Hz @ 4:4:4
      4k @ 60Hz
      4k @ 60Hz @ 4:4:4

      Additionally, the TV’s display specs make it far better than virtually any normal PC monitor at displaying online content, PC games and so forth. I’d just suggest you have a more 4K-friendly OS running on your computer, like Windows 10 or if you’re using an Apple machine OS X Yosemite v10.10.3 and newer.

      Reply

  • as
    February 25, 2017 at 7:59 pm

    Anyone know why the 700D model is “energy star certified” when it states it’s kwh/yr is more than the 800D model which is not “energy star certified”?

    Thanks.

    Reply

  • Akhilesh
    April 17, 2017 at 10:49 am

    I’m stuck between Sony x83d 43inch and Samsung ku7000 series my main usage is 4K gaming through Ps4 pro. Video streaming is also a thing to be considered. Please advice me which one will best suit me.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 17, 2017 at 7:15 pm

      Hello there Akhilesh. I’m not quite sure which TV the Sony X83D is but judging by its size i’m guessing you’re referring to a foreign model number version of the Sony X800D. What region of the world would this be in? In any case, assuming it’s a version of the X800D, then the model i’d recommend more is the Sony TV but only by a slight margin due to its superior motion handling capabilities. The Samsung KU7000 is however also a very good mid-range 4K TV with HDR color capacity, decent brightness, fairly good motion handling and very good content upscaling. Both offer very similar PS4 Pro gaming capacity though the KU7000 delivers slightly better input lag for 4K content in HDR. For streaming, either TV works well.

      Reply

  • Phil
    April 24, 2017 at 1:00 pm

    Hi Stephen, great review! I figure the Sony TV XD80 series is the best in my price range for judder-less movie watching and PS4 gaming, however I’m torn between the 43 and the 49 inch models. In UK shops there’s only a £50 price difference between the two sizes, but I’m weighing up the difference in specs – the markedly better picture & contrast on the 43’s VPS screen, versus the added size on the 49’s dimmer IPS.
    We’re sat about 8-9 feet from the TV cabinet. Do you have any advice on which size would give the better viewing experience?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 15, 2017 at 1:23 pm

      Hi Phil, the 49 inch model would definitely be the better idea at that viewing distance, even if you lose a bit on black level and brightness.Another option would be to simply go for a VA panel 4K TV with a similar price and size, like Samsung’s KU6300 (KU6400 I believe in the UK) with a 50 inch display. It does not have an IPS panel and provides excellent black levels as well as good peak brightness.

      Reply

  • Ganesh Harikrishnan
    May 6, 2017 at 9:52 am

    Does this model supports both HDR10 and Dolby Vision formats?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 15, 2017 at 12:58 pm

      Hello Ganesh. No, the X800D only supports HDR10. None of Sony’s 2016 4K HDR TVs support Dolby Vision. Only Vizio’s and LG’s models did that for last year from the major brands.

      Reply

  • vikrant bhardwaj
    May 22, 2017 at 6:28 am

    Which is better one 55ku7000 or 49kd8000d as i am getting 55ku7000 in lower price

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 22, 2017 at 12:51 pm

      Hi there Vikrant. Go for the KU7000. We have not reviewed the other model you mention so i’m not familiar with it in that name but I can say for sure that the KU7000 is a solid performer that’s unlikely to leave you disappointed, especially if it’s selling for a lower price. It delivers excellent color performance, very good blck levels and contrast and its display panel has good brightness. Furthermore, if you’re into console gaming, all of Samsung’s 2016 4K TVs are very good at low input lag in 4K resolution, 1080p resolution or with HDR gaming. the KU7000 is no exception.

      Reply

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