43 comments

Samsung KS9000 SUHD 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED 2016 TV Review (UN65KS9000, UN55KS9000)

by on April 7, 2016
Details
 
Manufacture
Overview

After releasing several thoroughly reinvented 4K TVs in 2015 in the form of their now famous SUHD lineup, Samsung has continued their new branding choice into 2016 with the next generation of SUHD 4K ultra HD smart TVs with HDR and quantum dot color enhancement. The KS9000 4K SUHD TV, which comes in two different sizes at 55 and 65 inches, is the second tier SUHD TV for 2016, one notch below the next-up, temporary flagship model KS9500 television (until the KS9800 comes in June). In other words, this particular TV is the next generation equivalent of the 2015 JS9000 , which was itself one highly acclaimed piece of home entertainment technology.

First of all we should note that after careful examination of the new KS-Line of 4K TVs and the KS9000 in particular for this review, we can say that a lot of the features and specs for both the 2015 and 2016 models are virtually identical. Samsung itself has gone ahead and changed up a lot of their marketing terminology for the new SUHD model but the essential technologies behind these labels are either the same or only slightly refined in the KS9000 from its 2015 SUHD JS9000.

On the one hand, this is a bit sneaky on Samsung’s part, but on the other hand, there are major key enhancements between last year’s models and the 2016 KS9000 and other SUHD TVs which make this a far superior 4K UHD TV in its display quality. Most particularly, in the KS9000 and its 2016 SUHD cousins, HDR has been improved enormously with all new heights of peak brightness and contrast performance. This makes the KS9000 into one downright superb television that could easily be considered one of the best non-OLED television models for this year.

Furthermore, this isn’t to say that there aren’t some genuine improvements at work in the KS9000. Because as we’ll shortly see, this new model definitely upped the ante on high dynamic range and color technology, with contrast improvements being a particular new benefit as we’re going to soon see.

The Good

Like we said, even if the KS9000 come with an overwhelming majority of the same essential specs as the JS9000 from 2015, it’s copying a lot from what was an excellent TV and still remains as one of the best 4K LCD models on sale today. That aside, the KS9000 2016 SUHD does indeed improve on its predecessors abilities and thus can soundly be called an even better 4K TV, meaning that this particular model is downright superb in so many ways.

There are a number of things which particularly make this new model into one superb performer. First among them is the sheer quality of black levels, contrast and color saturation. This is after all an HDR TV from one of the leading brands on the market and its internal high dynamic range and display specs are designed to conform to the standards for “Ultra HD premium” from the UHD Alliance. The quality thus really shows in the display quality of the KS9000 in both of its size ranges.

Secondly, the depth and clarity of Samsung’s Ultra Clear Panel technology and the strong LED qualities in the TV’s screen only help enhance both contrast and sharpness. Light flow to bright areas of the screen is downright top notch for an LCD TV and images look nicely dynamic as per the HDR standards built into the KS9000. On top of all this, the upscaling technology in the KS9000 is downright superb, with SD, 720p and Full HD content in particular all getting the benefit of some excellent augmentation in their quality. The effect can be a bit weak or even fuzzy looking in poorly mastered SD video sources but for high quality DVDs and pretty much any sort of 720p or 1080p content, Samsung’s 2016 upscaling engine does its work like a pro.

There’s also one other cool new upscaling/remastering feature at work in the KS9000 that we never noted in the 2015 JS9000 model. This is the newer TV’s ability to also upscale the contrast in non-HDR or “non-SUHD” content, as Samsung calls it. In simple terms, the TV augments brightness and vividness in SDR video sources for improved contrast levels which often do indeed create a superior level of picture quality.

Next, the Samsung Tizen smart TV OS --which we’ve reviewed before in our Smart TV platform guide— works as well as it ever has in the KS9000. This is in our view the second best smart TV platform on the market today, lagging a bit behind only LG’s WebOS smart interfaces and the KS9000’s quad-core processor makes sure that Tizen runs smoothly and easily in this TV. Usability and access to smart TV apps are both superb as well.

Finally, we’re downright happy that Samsung has also given this 2016 SUHD TV a flat display panel option. As we’ve explained in detail before, curved screen design was little more than a silly gimmick when it started being introduced to all normal-sized 4K TVs in late 2014 and we’re happy to see signs that it’s fading away.

Check the Price of the Samsung Electronics UN65KS9000FXZA 65" 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED TV on Amazon

0.0 - No Reviews

The bad

On the other hand, the KS9000 isn’t a perfect 4K TV by any means and while its flaws are definitely few and far between, it has a couple of them, some very minor and a couple we think are a bit more criticism worthy.

First of all, this TV still suffers from the side-angle viewing problems of some of its 2015 SUHD cousins. The viewing angles on the KS9000 aren’t terrible but we definitely think that Samsung could have put more effort into improving their LCD TV technology for handling angles better. Color saturation and contrast both suffer markedly at wide off-center angles.

We should also note that while the black levels and “Supreme Dimming” precision in the KS9000 are definite winners in comparison to other LCD TVs on the market this year, the KS9000 doesn’t come close to matching OLED technology in the quality of its blacks still or the precision of its local dimming technology. LCD still has a ways to go in this regard it seems, even with the latest premium TV models like this one.

Secondly, Samsung should know by now that simpler is better when it comes to all the display bloat produced by special picture enhancing technologies like those found in the KS9000. While yes, some of them do a great job of creating a superior viewing experience, others only work to over saturate images or create oddly unnatural visual effects. It’s a shame some of these features are on by default in this TV right out of the box, forcing you to tone things down manually. The AutoMotion Plus is a particular hassle due to the strange effects it creates in 2D content and movies.

Finally, while this may not bother a large percentage of viewers in the least, some people who are thinking of buying this new TV or the other SUHD 2016 models will be unhappy to know that Samsung has not given the KS9000 any sort of 3D support, neither passive nor active. So there’s that for you fans of 3D immersion to chew on when you’re thinking of buying.

Final Thoughts

On the whole, the 2016 SUHD TVs in general are looking great and the KS9000 is a fine replacement for the JS9000 from last year. We love this TV in most of its specs and think its new “ultra HD Premium” HDR features are a definite improvement on the HDR capabilities of last year’s counterpart to this TV, making the 2016 SUHD version the better buying choice if you’ve never owned either TV and are wondering which to go for.

However, if you already own a JS9000 from 2015 and you’re happy with its high dynamic range and color features, there’s really no need to change it up for this newer version quite yet. The two TVs are remarkably similar in most ways.

Specs

UN65KS9000FXZA or UN65KS9000 - 65 inch version
UN55KS9000FXZA or UN65KS9000 - 55 inch version

• Screen size: 54.6 diagonal inches and 64.5 diagonal inches
• Smart TV: Tizen OS, Smart Hub, Smart TV with Apps and Full Web Browser
• HEVC (H.265) Included: Yes
• VP9 Included. Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 120Hz native refresh rate (Supreme Motion Rate 240Hz)
• Screen Lighting: Edge-lit LED backlighting with Supreme Dimming tech
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes both built-in WiFi and Ethernet port
• Remotes: Samsung smart button remote
• Connectivity: 4 HDMI 2.0a ports, 3 USB ports, 1 Ethernet port, 1 Component, 1 composite, 1 Audio Out, 1 Digital Audio Out
• Sound: 60W (20W x 2, Woofer 10W x 2) Down Firing w/Tweeter (4.1CH) speakers with with Dolby Digital Plus
• Contrast Ratio: 6,545:1
• Black Level maximum: 0.017 cd/m2
• Other Display Features: Auto Depth Enhancer and Ultra Clear Panel technology
• TV weight without/with stand: 58.2 lb./ 63.1 lb.
• Dimensions: 57.0" x 32.9" x 1.6" inches without stand/ With stand: 57.0" x 36.6" x 16.3" inches
• Processor: Quad-core

Highlights

The new core highlights of the 2016 KS9000 SUHD 4K TV are definitely its visual features, followed by the more traditional qualities in its smart TV platform. Due to these, this is one hell of a great LCD TV and even by the standards of other top-shelf LCD 4K UHD TVs in 2016 so far, it stands out as an excellent model.

• Quantum Dot Color: This is essentially the same technology as last year’s Nano Crystal technology but with a new name given to it for marketing purposes. In either case, quantum dot color definitely does add a notable visual benefit to the colors on the screen and enhances vibrancy and realism in particular. The quantum nano crystal layer between LCD screen and the KS9000’s backlight creates a particularly powerful effect when combined with the color enhancements of high dynamic range technology in this model.

• HDR 1000: This is Samsung’s version of 2016 UHD Alliance certified HDR technology and it looks superb in the KS9000. Blacks are deep and rich by LCD standards, bright spots are capable of peaking at over 1000 nits of brightness and the overall quality of the HDR in the KS9000 is definitely superior to that of the dynamic range found in the 2015 JS9000. Unlike 4K resolution itself, HDR is immediately and obviously visible when placed next to SDR display or lower quality HDR, and the KS9000 shines in the quality of its high dynamic range.

• Peak Illuminator Ultimate: This is an integral part of the KS9000’s HDR technology and isn’t found in the 2015 JS9000. Along with Ultra Black and it is the mechanism by which this TV can produce exceptionally bright whites in onscreen content. In this, the KS9000 definitely beats even the best existing OLED TVs, with peak brightness of at least 1100 nits being easily possible and spot brightness points that were measured to go as high as even 1400 nits, taking the KS9000 well into the range of UHD Alliance HDR qualifications for this spec.

• Ultra Black: This is the counterpoint technology to Peak Illuminator Ultimate and it is another improvement over the specs of the 2015 JS9000, which only features the rather weaker Precision Black spec. With Ultra Black, the KS9000 is capable of hitting black levels that go as low as 0.001 cd/m2 if smart local dimming is also activated, but achieves a more regular black level of 0.034 cd/m2, which is still impressive by LCD TV standards. Ultra Black and Peak Illuminator Ultimate are the two core technologies behind the KS9000’s HDR capabilities.

• Smart Features: The 2016 version of the Tizen smart TV OS in this and other new SUHD TVs is not a dramatic improvement from the 2015 Tizen smart platform but it does come with some minor upgrades. The new smart remote now features superior point and click capability and the quad core processor has ceated what we think is a smoother and faster Smart platform navigation than that we noted in the 2015 SUHD TVs we reviewed. Furthermore, access to Smart Apps is better than ever. We also love the new addition of an auto device detection mechanism, which is very handy for quickly accessing content from external devices.

• Sound: The sound quality of the KS9000’s speakers is downright remarkable when you consider the fact that they’re housed inside a chassis with less than an inch of depth. This TV creates some very high quality native sound and offers several different audio configuration modes to choose from with Music sound being the sharpest and riches in our view.

Check the Price of the Samsung Electronics UN65KS9000FXZA 65" 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED TV on Amazon

0.0 - No Reviews

Visual Specs

As we’ve already mentioned, the visual specs of the KS9000 are superb –definitely when measured against those of other newer or older LCD 4K TVs and even when measured up against OLED technology in terms of peak brightness capacity.

For starters, this TV manages the already-mentioned “Ultra HD Premium” level peak brightness of well beyond 1000 nits, with the ability to peak at more than 1400 nits of maximum focal point brightness on the screen. That in turn is complemented by an also superb black level capacity that can take darkness down to well beyond the UHD Alliance-specified minimum of 0.05 nits, with the KS9000 easily managing 0.017 nits against a white level of 99.3 cd/m2 (cd/m2 being numerically equal to nits) and even being capable of reaching around 0.001 nits of specific dark levels with local dimming technology activated. The result of these two technologies alone is a superb level of contrast and some excellent range in contrast levels for rich, fine details on the screen during viewing of both HDR content and to a lesser extent, even SDR content, which benefits from the TV’s dynamic range chops.

Next up, there is the color performance of the KS9000. In the 2016/2016 SUHD models, just as in the 2015 SUHD TVs, Samsung has once again added in quantum dot nano crystal color and simply given it a new name, finally calling it quantum dot color. This QD technology consists of a layer of ultra thin film located between the LCD panel and the front protective glass of the TV. As the quantum dot crystals are struck by the light from the TV’s LEDs after it has also passed through the TV’s pixels, they produce a broader, richer range of color values for both greater realism and superior vibrancy.

On the other hand, the KS9000 also fails somewhat in terms of the ideal for color performance as it’s defined in HDR standards from both the UHD Alliance and even the Dolby Vision high dynamic range standard. While the TV manages a level of DCI-P3 performance that is impressive enough, at about 97% of the color space for P3 represented, the TV’s Rec.2020 performance is not quite as good, since the Rec.2020 color space container is larger than DCI-P3. This TV only manages roughly 73% of Rec.2020 standards. This still means it’s pretty much good enough for UHD Alliance color standards and most viewers likely won’t even notice the weakness here, but the KS9000 is not what we’d call a perfect color performer.

Finally, on a more basic level, while this particular SUHD model delivers some superb visible color performance, great contrast and truly excellent brightness, its viewing angles could definitely use some work, with a notable percentage of color, contrast and brightness lost suring wide angle viewing.

Connectivity

The connectivity features of the KS9000 are just about identical to those of the 2015 Samsung SUHD TVs In this year’s models, you get a total of 4 HDMI 2.0a ports, with full HDR content transmission capacity and 3 USB 2.0 ports. Samsung could have finally given their 2016 SUHD TVs USB 3.0 but decided not to and we consider this disappointing, but it’s definitely not a major complaint.

The usual built-in WiFi and Ethernet connectivity are both present an the new 2016 Tizen smart TV platform offers access to an even wider array of 4K UHD content apps and entertainment options, thanks largely to growth in the market. Since both HEVC and VP9 content compression codecs are supported by the KS9000, you can use it and its full web browsing capacity or its assorted streaming apps to watch pretty much the full range of online 4K content, from both YouTube (VP9) and all other streaming media platforms (HEVC).

Pricing

The KS9000 SUHD HDR 4K smart TV is selling for what we’d consider to be a reasonable range of prices for its two different size ranges. At $2,297.99 for the 55 inch model and $3,497.99 for the 65 inch version, the TV is priced almost identically to its 2015 JS9000 cousins in the same size ranges, even though the 2016 version offers far superior high dynamic range performance.

Check the Price of the Samsung Electronics UN65KS9000FXZA 65" 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED TV on Amazon

0.0 - No Reviews


Not so Great

To summarize briefly, the KS9000’s biggest defects are its surprisingly poor viewing angles, less than OLED-level black level performance and its lack of 3D technology. We also think the TV could have used a couple USB 3.0 ports and would have benefited from full-array LED backlighting considering its price and status.

Positives

• Excellent HDR specs
• Superb peak brightness
• Some very deep rich blacks
• Great smart platform
• Physically beautiful
• Very good color performance

Negatives

• Weak viewing angles
• No 3D support
• Lacks USB 3.0
• We’d prefer full-array LED backlighting

Editor Rating
 
Features
A

 
Quality
A

 
User Friendliness
A

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
A-

Total Score
A

Hover To Rate
User Rating
 
Features
B

 
Quality
B

 
User Friendliness
B+

 
Connectivity
B+

 
Price
B

User Score
359 ratings
B

You have rated this

Bottom Line
 

The bottom line is that the Samsung KS9000 is one excellent choice for a 2016 4K HDR LCD TV if you haven’t yet bought one and are looking for a premium model or want top-shelf HDR technology. However, if you’re not worried about the best in high dynamic range and already own a 2015 JS9000 or JS9500 SUHD TV, or comparable Sony LCD models, you can skip this model without a problem.

Check the Price of the Samsung Electronics UN65KS9000FXZA 65" 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED TV on Amazon

0.0 - No Reviews

 
43 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • dantani
    April 16, 2016 at 12:40 pm

    I thought the only difference between the KS9000 and the KS9500 is just cosmetics with one being flat and the other being curved.

    And that the KS9800 IS the flagship with the full array local dimming etc

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 17, 2016 at 2:25 am

      Hello there Dantani, the review mentions that the KS9500 is the next up in the KS-Series and only temporarily the Samsung flagship until the KS9800’s arrival in June. Thanks for noting it though.

      Reply

    • Le gallic
      August 16, 2016 at 10:57 pm

      Hello which is the flat model in France ??

      Reply

      • Stephen
        Stephen
        August 17, 2016 at 11:22 am

        Hello Le gallic, I believe that in France the model which fits the UNKS9000 is the UEKS9000L (UE49KS9000L, UE55KS9000L, UE65KS9000L). However, from what I know, the French models are curved instead of flat for some reason, though I’d recommend checking for flat screen versions in your local market if that’s what you prefer.

        Reply

  • Steve Z
    April 27, 2016 at 5:31 am

    Hi Stephen,

    I am considering the UN55KS9000 or the LG OLED 55EF9500. It is for my bedroom. I currently own a Samsung and have had it for the past 10 years so any of these two choices I go with will definitely be a step up! Price is not really a factor here, I just heard some things about burn-in with the OLED tvs so I am a little worried, plus my whole family owns Samsungs and we’ve never had an issue… I would be using the TV for Netflix, sports watching, and console gaming mostly.

    it’s a tough choice! which would you recommend?
    thank you!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 29, 2016 at 6:39 pm

      Hello there Steve, First of all, the burn-in issue with LG’s OLED TVs isn’t a problem for newer models in 2015 and 2016, such as the EF9500. While we can’t be 100% sure of this, we’ve heard from many reliable sources that LG has definitely fixed the burn-in problem of their older OLEDs and Plasma models in all newer 2015/2016 models.

      With that out of the way, I suggest the following conditional advice for your two choices of KS9000 and EF9500: If you want truly high level and superb peak brightness with excellent but not perfect black tones, then go with the Samsung KS9000, it offers some of the very best LCD 4K TV HDR and color we’ve seen in 2016. On the other hand, if you want perfect blacks and absolutely pixel-perfect local dimming, go for the EF9500 OLED 4K TV. It is still one of LG’s best models but its peak brightness will be less than half of what the KS9000 is capable of outputting

      Reply

      • YourWorstNightmare
        May 31, 2016 at 11:00 pm

        The difference in brightness may be half technically speaking BUT when u factor in the perfect black and mindblowing contrast and popping color offered on the OLED, the level of quality overrides any brightness specs on a piece of paper. And LGs 2016s are now uhd certified with 4k and hdr having increased brightness by 20-30% which again, factoring in the perfect black ,contrqst and colors would look like much more than 20-30%. They invested billions of dollars into tbeir panels this year and offer a wide variety with many differnt affordable prices. The G6 has no competition

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          June 2, 2016 at 8:40 pm

          On this we’d wholeheartedly agree. For starters, the latest OLED models now offer peak brightness that’s actually at least 30% and in some cases as much as 50% higher than that of many 2014 and 2015 LCD TVs and most importantly, in these cases and even when measured up against 2015 and 2016 LCD TVs with higher peak brightness, the OLED models’ perfect pitch black delivery truly creates a stunning perceived brightness effect that’s difficult for even the best LCD TVs to match. In our view as well –as we’d stated in our review of the 2016 LG OLED G6 TV– there are no current rivals to the latest OLED 4K models.

          Reply

  • Scott M
    April 29, 2016 at 6:13 pm

    Hello,

    How come there is so few reviews of the new KS series on Amazon/Samsung site? Are people just basing off the Amazon reviews and see that the JS8500 has a ton more reviews than the KS9000 and buying it instead? Even though its last years model?

    Thanks Scott

    Reply

  • Lee
    May 4, 2016 at 3:11 am

    Can you provide calibrated settings that will work best for HDR content? Thanks

    Reply

  • Jesse
    May 5, 2016 at 9:21 am

    No mention of the Smartthings Hub at all? I think that’s one of the main reasons I’m looking at the 2016’s over the 2015’s.

    Reply

  • Dennis
    May 7, 2016 at 6:24 pm

    Just bought the Js9000 a few months ago for a pretty good deal (less than 2,000). Just bought the Samsung 4K bluray player today and The Martian looks incredible. I shouldve known newer Tvs were coming soon though. Oh well, next time i know to wait until summer to buy my Tv. But i cant believe they got rid of the 3D.. Its a cool feature to have. I like being able to turn any HD video into 3D. Gaming or movies. Sure most probably dont use it, but its a cool feature just in case. That kinda makes me glad i have the Js9000 instead.

    Reply

  • Todd
    June 6, 2016 at 4:58 pm

    Hello – I’m trying to decide between this KS9000 and the Sony 930. Since my wife and I watch mostly movies and sports, I’m trying to figure out which of these sets has the edge in motion processing. Any thoughts?

    Thanks!

    Todd

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 8, 2016 at 5:52 pm

      Hey there Todd. Both TVs actually create nearly identical levels of motion processing and motion interpolation quality. The X930D offers very slightly better motion blur control but the difference is small enough that it’s very hard to notice anyhow. Thus, you should pick between these two TVs based on their other specs. And in that regard, we suggest the KS9000 as the slightly better TV. It offers a superior level of peak brightness and better contrast as well. Both TVs are evenly matched in the quality of the color they deliver.

      Reply

  • Dave mcarthur
    June 7, 2016 at 1:15 am

    I don’t understand how you can say that that the ks9000 could easily be considered one of the best non oled models for this year. The over bright edge lighting (from the bottom) affects the picture to the extent that when watching a film in 21:9 ratio, this is seriously distracting and when compared to something like the full array Panasonic dx902 with 512 zones, the Samsung can’t be considered the best tv as it’s quite clearly not, and let’s not talk about curve. For anyone that’s thinking about buying a curve tv, is there actual clinical evidence that curve makes the picture better? It actually makes the picture worse with more reflections and bent lines. I’ll never have another curve to. The curve is dead, long live the flat.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 7, 2016 at 1:26 pm

      Hello Dave, no 4K TV is without issues and even among individual units, there can be minor defects. However, in our experience the KS9000 is definitely an excellent 4K LCD TV and its HDR specs are fantastic. This is a view shared by many other review sites and user reviews as well. That said, the KS9000 is also a flat screened model, the curved version is the otherwise identical KS9500. With that, I’d also like to mention that I actually agree with you on your view of curved display and we even did an entire piece covering a comparison between curved and flat, with our preference definitely being for flat screened 4K TVs. You can see our detailed overview of the two design types here: http://4k.com/curved-tv-vs-flat-screen-tv-to-curve-or-not-to-curve-debate/

      Reply

  • Nav S
    June 14, 2016 at 7:14 am

    hi there what tv is worth purchasing for gaming and movies and overall picture quality (SAMSUNG 48JS9000(2015) VS 49KS9000 (2016) and does the js9000 include HDR like the js9500 or ks9000 ?

    bearing in mind i will be wall mounting this tv in my bedroom so viewing angle is no issue as I’m looking directly at the TV , is it really worth the $800 upgrade to get the ks9000, will i see a difference? or shall i stick with the js9000 as the ks9000 doesn’t have usb 3.0 or 3D (is the ks9000 worth the upgrade in picture quality in your personal opinion)

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 14, 2016 at 9:07 pm

      Hi there Nav, your two questions are related and i’ll try to answer them in order. First of all, the KS9000 is definitely the superior TV when compared to the JS9000 and even to the JS95000. All three models come with wide color gamut and offer similar color performance as well as similar upscaling and motion control specs but the KS9000 delivers the much higher level of HDR for peak brightness and black level. In fact, its peak brightness is capable of reaching three times the level of the JS9000 and consequently, it’s contrast level is just about twice as strong as that of the JS9000. Furthermore, the motion control specs of the KS9000 are slightly better than those of the JS0000 and the 2016 Tizen smart TV platform is in our view a bit more user friendly than its 2015 counterpart.

      Reply

  • Rob
    July 28, 2016 at 8:11 am

    Good review, and I appreciate your detailed responses to the questions.

    Reply

  • Mike
    August 3, 2016 at 9:54 pm

    Hi do you think the ks9000 is worth the 800 increase over the ks8000….deciding between the 2 now.

    Reply

  • Ron Batchelor
    August 9, 2016 at 9:22 pm

    Hello,
    I’ve heard the Lg Oled has major problems with whites and the dreaded “soap opera effect” . I was wondering do you have any info/comments on that since you suggested the Lg. THANKS , Ron

    Reply

    • Jared
      November 23, 2016 at 1:34 pm

      FYI the LG OLEDs also currently have TERRIBLE display lag, so don’t plan on using any interactive content (like PS4 or XBOX, etc) with it or you’ll be sorely disappointed. Since LG and many review sites hid this fact initially, a LOT of people got screwed out of $3000+ because they didn’t realize they had such a serious flaw – they are literally useless for any game that requires anything close to quick or precise controls.

      If you are sure you’ll never use it for gaming or interactive content, then it is a fantastic TV otherwise! I wouldn’t use the MotionPlus effects (which cause the soap opera effect) on any TV, it’s just not worth it, it always looks worse. I hear that it’s tolerable on some 2016 models with very low, specific motion processing settings only… but so far, I’ve never seen it look good on any TV, ever.

      Reply

      • Jared
        November 23, 2016 at 1:37 pm

        But I forgot to add, all TVs also let you turn off the MotionPlus type settings, even though they’re always on by default it seems (they all call it something different, too), so one of the first things you should do is watch a bluray with it on, and immediately turn it off and see how much better it looks.

        Of course, maybe someday it’ll be good enough to be useful, but so far, not in my experience.

        Reply

  • James
    August 15, 2016 at 9:05 pm

    Hi there,

    Great reviews! Do you think the KS9000 features are worth $800 more than the KS8000? I’m most concerned with gaming, movies, and upsclaing features. I would like the smoothest motion possible and I hate the SOE.

    Thanks!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      August 17, 2016 at 9:20 am

      Hi there James, overall, the KS9000 delivers a superior level of dimming and peak brightness but the difference is rather moderate in comparison to the KS8000. In terms of motion control (for smooth motion) and upscaling, the two models are basically identical in their quality and the color representation both offer is pretty much the same high level (about 95%) of DCI-P3 color space coverage. Both offer wide color gamut, naturally enough. I’d say that you could easily go for the KS8000, save yourself the money and be just as happy, unless the black level and peak brightness are sticking points for you, but again, even on these, the difference is small.

      Overall, the differences among Samsung’s main 2016 SUHD TVs are much smaller than they were among the company’s 2015 SUHD TVs. The one exception is the KS9800, which offers considerably better brightness and much better local dimming than the rest of the edge-lit 2016 SUHD models.

      Reply

      • Laura
        November 27, 2016 at 8:26 pm

        Hi, have you encountered any issues or seen any posts or videos where the back panels on the KS 8000 coming loose from the back. The back panels of the 8000’s are not the same design as the 9000 series. I also don’t understand why Samsung did not give us a 60 in option in the KS9000. Thoughts?

        Reply

  • Terry
    August 16, 2016 at 6:24 pm

    I have the Samsung js9000,presently my cable provider doesn’t provide 4K channels yet,do you still recommend getting the expensive 4K hdmi cables recommended for the tv I have.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      August 17, 2016 at 11:19 am

      Hi there Terry, I do indeed recommend them. However, to save a bit of money, don’t worry about getting name brand cables and simply go for any type that’s labeled “high speed” because these consist of HDMI 2.0 capacity for [email protected] and if you want HDR capacity as well since your model is an HDR TV, then I’d recommend “Premium High Speed HDMI” certified Cables. As long as these labels apply to the cables you’re looking at, go for whatever brand sells them cheapest, there will be little or no difference.

      Why get the HDMI cables? Because you’ll likely need them at some point anyhow even if your cable provider doesn’t offer 4K channels. 4K Blu-ray players depend on HDMI 2.0 for 4K content at maximum smoothness and the same applies for most set-top boxes with 4K content streaming as well.

      Reply

  • Barry
    August 21, 2016 at 8:40 pm

    Hello – all set to buy the KS9000, but that leaves no extra money for a 4K disc player anytime soon. If I go with the KS8000, I can pick up a 4K player at same time. I consider myself a pretty picky TV viewer, so I’m definitely worried about light bleeding and flashlighting from the bottom of the screen. I’ve been told that the KS series exhibits this problem more than the Sony X930D. Any solid advice here? Thanks so much…

    Reply

  • Vasanth
    September 30, 2016 at 10:59 am

    Does the smart remote coming with KS900 have Motion Control? Does the web browser support Flash Player?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 3, 2016 at 8:42 am

      Hello Vasanth, the smart remote of the KS9000 does not support gesture control, though it does offer voice control which we consider to be better anyhow. As for Flash player support in the web browser, we’re not sure. We didn’t check for this.

      Reply

  • JG
    October 31, 2016 at 4:16 pm

    Stephen,
    Do you have a listing of the calibration settings you used or a link to a good resource for calibrating this TV? I just purchased to replace my Pioneer Elite Kuro.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 31, 2016 at 8:08 pm

      Hello there JG, what sort of calibration settings are you especially interested in? For TV and movie watching I recommend the following: First, set the picture mode to “Movie” for the best general calibration settings for movies of all types, this is found under the Picture settings menu. There are also other colder settings like “Standard” available if Movie seems a bit too saturated with yellow tones. If you’re watching in dark room, set your backlight to a lower setting like 2 or 3 for enjoyment of Samsung’s rich black levels and we’d also recommend setting brightness to half way in darker room conditions. These settings should both be moved upwards during daylight, bright room TV watching. I’d also recommend setting contrast to 100% and color to about 45 or 50 (half-way) to avoid over saturated colors.

      Additionally, activate set your TV’s color to “Warm2” or “Warm1” for even further overall color calibration during movie watching. Additionally, activate “Smart LED” to keep local dimming on in your TV, for maximum black levels in dark scenes. Finally, if you’re watching low quality non- 4K content from a cable TV or DVDs, we’d suggest turning on Digital Clean View for the best level of content upscaling. All of these above settings can be modified under the KS9000’s Expert Settings menu.

      If you’d like to do HDR console gaming, set the “Game” mode in the “Special Viewing Mode” section of the KS9000’s picture menu. If you’d like to have HDR for your gaming mode, turn on Smart LED (local dimming) to high, the backlight settings to their maximum and change “Color Space” to “Native”

      Reply

  • Jared
    November 23, 2016 at 1:28 pm

    I’m really appreciative of your review process and the fact that you seem to review/cover almost all models on the market! Very helpful.

    Might I suggest something? More and more people (maybe even MOST at this point) are buying these for the PS4 Pro and XBOX ONE S because they support 4K and HDR now, and the Xbox One S is one of the only reasonably priced UHD Bluray players in existence, currently. However, DISPLAY LAG is a huge issue now. Most 4k TVs are barely passable for gaming. Samsungs, in game mode, at least have OKAY lag (25ms I heard) while still supporting HDR – but anything else generally is in the 30-65ms range. LG OLEDs are unusable for anything but passive viewing, the input lag is crazy for any gaming or anything interactive. Vizio P series are great value for the specs, but they have TERRIBLE input lag and a useless game mode that does very little to the terrible display lag AND doesn’t support HDR or DolbyVision in the game mode anyway.

    I’d say the above issue should become a very important part of your review process… people need this info, whether they realize it yet or not (and make a $2000+ mistake before they do). Input lag is very noticeable when you know to look for it, but someone with a new OLED and the WOW factor of the visuals may take longer than the 30 day return period to realize they can’t play many games on it without serious issues.

    Reply

  • michael S
    December 8, 2016 at 10:37 pm

    hello can you tell me why some un65ks9000fxza have a solid black frame around the frame and I seen some with silver around the outter frame thank you

    Reply

  • Vince
    December 18, 2016 at 5:01 am

    Hello,

    Can you tell me why the 65″ KS9000 priced at about $2200 and 75″ KS9000 priced at $6000 have such a large price differential ?
    Does the 75″ have something more than screen size that separates it from the 65″?

    Reply

  • Ronivon Fideles
    December 21, 2016 at 2:42 pm

    Sony XBR-65X93D vs Samsung 65Ks9000 ???

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      March 19, 2017 at 6:51 am

      Hello Ronivon, the KS9000 is the superior TV of the two in our view. It not only delivers higher levels of peak brightness and better, deeper black levels, it’s also just as good at motion handling and color delivery. Basically, both TVs are generally fantastic models in almost everything but the KS9000 wins on contrast, black level and peak brightness, which are crucial display specs to have at their best. Also, Samsung’s KS9000 is a much better TV for console gaming in 4K and HDR if that’s your thing.

      Reply

  • Kurabi
    December 28, 2016 at 10:32 pm

    This or Sony 65″ X9300D 4K HDR TV…can’t decide.

    Help please!

    Reply

  • James
    May 31, 2017 at 10:08 pm

    Hello,

    Reviewing the new Samsung MU8000’s and with some of the negatives, wondering what you think of this versus the KS9000? Can get the KS9000 for about $200 more right now. Seems like the picture quality, brightness and a few other things are superior in the KS9000, though the rating is a year older. Would love to hear your thoughts, thanks!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 9, 2017 at 2:09 pm

      Hey there James. I’d definitely recommend the KS9000 more than the MU8000. As you noted in our review, we think the MU8000 is a great TV but the 9000 outclasses it in all respects, especially in terms of peak brightness, which it does far, far better. The benefits of the KS9000 are worth the extra $200 in this case.

      Reply

  • Cziráki Balázs
    August 16, 2017 at 4:40 am

    Hi Stephen,

    I want to buy a new TV for my PS4 PRO to take advantage of the 4k and HDR supports of the PS.
    I would use it for my PS4 mostly and secondly for watching movies, mostly Japanese animated series(720p and 1080p content).
    I’d like to know which one you’d recommend getting for this purpose, I think input lag shouldn’t be a problem on any of them so the question is which is better in performance and colors.
    In my country in the EU they have a bit different names than in the US.
    I have these 3 models in mind(their prices in brackets are in US$):
    – SAMSUNG UE43KS7500SXXH which should be the same as KS8500 in the US ($1300)
    – SAMSUNG UE49KS8000LXXH ($1550)
    – SAMSUNG UE49KS9000LXXH which is the curved version here ($1550)

    Which one would you recommend? Or if you can recommend any other model in this price range for this purpose I can check if we have that model in my country.

    Thank you,
    Balázs

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      August 25, 2017 at 6:18 pm

      Hello there Balazs, I’d strongly recommend the KS9000 among the models you mention. It costs the same as the KS8000 but has received slightly better reviewes overall. We also like it just a bit more due to smoother functionality though both the KS8000 and KS9000 have virtually identical display specs. More importantly though, both TVs are excellent models for console gaming in 4K resolution, 4K with HDR, 1080p with HDR and in normal 1080p and 4K. Their input lag is excellent with gaming consoles like the PS4 when these TVs are in game mode. Also, for movies of all types like you mention, both models offer an excellent level of picture quality, even for upscaling of non-4K content.

      Other models I also highly recommend with similar prices are Sony’s 2017 X900E or X850E TVs. If you can find those in Europe, they deliver display specs that are very good, excellent console gaming performance and some really solid color delivery as well as contrast.

      Reply

Leave a Reply to Ronivon Fideles  Cancel reply

Features

Quality

User Friendliness

Connectivity

Price