16 comments

Samsung KS8500 Review – 2016 SUHD 4K Ultra HD 240MR Smart LED TV (UN49KS8500, UN55KS8500, UN65KS8500)

by on April 18, 2016
Details
 
Manufacture
Overview

The KS8500 is nearly identical to its KS8000 cousin and the main thing which distinguishes the two as far as we can tell consists of the difference in curved vs. flat screen design. That said, this model, like the KS8000, offers one truly superb 4K LCD TV package for the new year and representative of how Samsung has really kicked things up a few notches from what they offered in their 2015 SUHD models.

Most notably, technologies for local dimming, motion control and weaker audio are what distinguishes the KS8500 and KS8000 models from their pricier KS9000 and KS9500 cousins. Beyond these, the degree of uniformity to the specs and quality in the entire 2016 SUHD line is much more consistent than it was in the 2015 models under the same brand. As for the KS8500 itself, its curved screen is a pointless touch that only adds to price without improving value (unless you just like the way curved design looks) but despite this, the TV is one excellent choice for high quality HDR display with 4K resolution for this year. The KS8500 isn’t entirely perfect but it won’t disappoint by any means.

The Good

Despite being the mid-level offer in the 2016 SUHD lineup, the KS8500 offers the same core display specs and HDR technology as it’s pricier and slightly better KS9000 and KS9500 cousins. Minor exceptions to this include the lack of Supreme UHD Dimming and so-called Supreme Motion Rate 240Hz in favor of UHD Dimming and Motion Rate 240Hz in the KS8500. Furthermore, the KS8500 offers slightly weaker speaker power than the already available KS9 models.

These little details aside, this TV gives virtually identical display performance and HDR technology, which is to say that it delivers both to a very high degree of quality in terms of contrast, peak brightness, color saturation and black levels. Ultra HD Premium certification from the UHD Alliance is part and parcel of the entire 2016 SUHD model lineup so with the KS8500 you’ll get your hands on rich 10-bit color with smooth tone gradients, some superb 1100+ nit peak brightness and deep rich blacks that go down to a darkness level of at least 0.05 nits. None of the 2015 SUHD TVs except the JS9500 could manage most of these display features and this essentially means that the KS8500 is superior to virtually all of them, despite being a mid-range 2016 SUHD TV. What’s most impressive is that this TV manages to deliver all of the above despite coming only with edge-lit LED backlighting, which is a serious testament to the power of Samsung’s LED and light distribution technologies.

Furthermore, the KS8500 delivers some of Samsung’s best yet upscaling technology, with a unique little twist. First, there is the usual upscaling of non-4K UHD content in the 480p, 720p and Full HD ranges, all of which are upscaled in their crispness superbly by the processing technology in this TV line (particularly 720p and Full HD video sources). However, going beyond the basic resolution upscaling, the KS8500 also manages to improve the contrast and dynamic range of these sorts of content sources wherever possible. You won’t get video that looks like native 4K HDR content from non-4K SDR content but you will get a superior viewing experience to that found in a non-4K TV or 4K SDR TV displaying the same content in most cases. This is definitely worth seeing at work in the TV. SDR 4K content also gets the benefit of the KS8500’s HDR enhancement technology, with notable improvements to some types of visuals and colors.

Finally, we have the 2016 Tizen smart TV platform with improved Smart Hub technology. Samsung has taken their already great 2015 Tizen/Smart Hub combo and refined it still further in the 2016 SUHD TVs (KS8500 included). Ease-of-use, intuitiveness and layout have all undergone some decent little improvements while the remote control now also offers improved smart manipulation abilities.

Check the Price of the Samsung KS8500 Curved 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2016 Model) on Amazon

5.0 - 1 Reviews

The bad

On the other hand, the KS8500 and its 2016 SUHD cousins are far from perfect, with a few minor and some moderate flaws working against them.

Next, we’re disappointed that the KS8500 and the rest of the 2016 SUHD lineup didn’t bother to include any sort of 3D content support in their specs. 3D 4K content may not be all that common and for most viewers the 3D absence will probably be a non-issue but since these are premium cutting edge 4K HDR TVs, the inclusion of 3D would have been a nice little bonus.

We’re also downright disappointed and annoyed that Samsung still fails to just give all of its premium SUHD TVs along with the KS8500 the benefit of full-array LED backlighting. Admittedly, the company manages to produce some fantastic contrast, peak brightness and local dimming despite the edge-lit arrays all of the 2016 SUHD TVs except the upcoming flagship KS9800 use but just image for a second how much better this already great LED technology would look if it was full-array. If Vizio can manage to pull full-array off across all of its 2016 P-Series models and still price them affordably, we completely fail to see why Samsung won’t do the same for its loyal customers.

Finally, the KS8500 is a curved 4K HDR TV model and its specs are otherwise pretty much identical to those of the flat screen KS8000. Why is this something we dislike? Well because despite the identical specs and screen sizes, the KS8500 sells for just under $200 more and the only reason for this is the pointless gimmicky screen curvature Samsung insists on keeping in its newest SUHD models. Forget the hype, curved screens in any normal-sized 4K TV are not more “immersive”. They do nothing except distort reflected light more and spoil viewing angles.

Final Thoughts

A few minor to slightly moderate flaws aside, we can’t help but really like the KS8500. It’s not much different from the KS8000 and even the KS9500 and KS9000 models are mostly the same but since they’re all great TVs, the KS8500 is also a great TV and definitely a serious candidate for anyone who’s looking for a new 2016 LCD 4K TV that delivers on everything essential for high quality and even cutting edge home entertainment.

Specs

• Screen size: 48.5 diagonal inches - UN49KS8500, 54.6 diagonal inches - UN55KS8500 and 64.5 diagonal inches - UN65KS8500
• Smart TV: Tizen OS, Smart Hub, Smart TV with Apps and Full Web Browser
• HEVC (H.265) Included: Yes
• VP9 Included. Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 120Hz native refresh rate (Motion Rate 120Hz)
• Screen Lighting: Edge-lit LED backlighting with Supreme Dimming tech
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes both built-in WiFi and Ethernet port
• Remotes: Samsung smart button remote
• Connectivity: 4 HDMI 2.0a ports, 3 USB ports, 1 Ethernet port, 1 Component, 1 composite, 1 Audio Out, 1 Digital Audio Out
• Sound: 40W (10W x 2, Woofer 10W x 2) Down Firing w/Bass Reflex (2.1CH) speakers with Dolby Digital Plus
• Contrast Ratio: 5,538:1
• Other Display Features: Curved display, Auto Depth Enhancer and Ultra Clear Panel technology
• Processor: Quad-core

Highlights

Quantum Dot Color: All of the 2016 SUHD TVs come with the inclusion of Samsung’s Quantum Dot Color feature and essentially, it’s the same quantum dot nanoparticle filter technology from the 2015 SUHD TVs but with a changed name (last year’s version was called Nano Crystal color). Regardless of name, the technology does enhance display performance and mainly serves to further augment the 10-bit HDR color reproduction specs of the KS8500 for an even richer more saturated color palette on the screen. QD color essentially works by interposing a layer of quantum dot nanocrystals of different sizes between LCD screen and LED backlight so that the crystals polarize into different primary colors when the light from the KS8500’s LEDs hits them. This then enhances the pixel-based color palette of the display output in more dynamic ways, creating a deeper vibrancy and color space coverage.

UHD Premium High Dynamic Range: Just like the other 2016 SUHD TVs, the KS8500 is certified by the UHD Alliance as a TV that matches their Ultra HD Premium color and dynamic range standards for HDR. This effectively means that this TV and the rest of the KS-Series all deliver peak brightness that reaches up to beyond 1100 nits and rich deep black levels that go no brighter than 0.05 nits for “completely black” spaces on the screen. The result is a high contrast level that completely beats what was the case in any 2015 SUHD TV except maybe the flagship JS9500. In comparison to its 2015 counterpart, the HDR-capable JS8500, the KS8500 is the definite winner in terms of superior, more advanced HDR specs. The main technologies behind this high dynamic range quality consist of Samsung’s HDR1000 spec, Peak Illuminator Pro, Precision Black and Samsung’s supplementary Ultra Black technology. All these fancy names aside, what you need to know about the capacities of the KS8500 is that it delivers high quality HDR with high peak brightness that can exceed 1450 nits in spot tests and deep black levels which can go as low as 0.001 nits with local dimming activated.

Smart TV Improvements: The 2016 version of the Tizen smart TV platform and its Smart Hub interface has definitely been streamlined still further from the great smart OS we saw in 2015’s Samsung 4K TVs. In 2015 Tizen was easily the second best smart TV system on the market after the truly stellar LG WebOS platform and in 2016 it keeps its second place spot. Now however, Tizen offers a superior point and click capacity better processor performance for faster navigation and more intuitive usability overall. The Samsung smart remote isn’t as good as LG’s Magic remote or Vizio’s truly innovative SmartCast tablet remote system but it’s good enough for anything you’ll need from the KS8500 and its smart TV interface.

Check the Price of the Samsung KS8500 Curved 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2016 Model) on Amazon

5.0 - 1 Reviews

Visual Specs

Simply speaking, the visual specs in the Samsung KS8500 are nothing short of superb almost across the board. This TV compares superbly with other major 2016 LCD 4K TVs and if you take into account the peak brightness the model is capable of, it’s an even better performer in this area than LG’s absolutely stunning G6 OLED 4K TV.

To start things off, the KS8500 delivers on the Ultra HD Premium certification it has been given by the ULD Alliance and does so wonderfully. Contrast and overall high dynamic range quality are excellent in this particular TV and color realism is downright great, thanks both to 10-bit color and quantum dot filters. Nonetheless, reading that all of these are great is one thing and actually seeing the performance of this TV in the flesh is another thing. Furthermore, the test numbers that back these claims up are definitely worth pondering.

Thus, as far as test specs go, the KS8500 manages broad peak luminance of 1000 to 1100 nits and in spot testing of smaller 2 to 10% areas of the TV’s display space can even reach peak brightness levels of 1400 nits or slightly more. That this is something Samsung could pull off in a TV with an edge-lit display is definitely impressive. As for the second major part of HDR contrast, there are the black levels, and in the KS8500 they are also superb, with normal black levels going as far down the scale as 0.019 cd/m2 and in some cases even reaching 0.001 nits (numerically equal to cd/m2) with local dimming activated, in contrast to white levels of 99 cd/m2. These two combined together add up to some truly superb native contrast that goes well above 4,000:1. As a bonus of these specs, SDR 4K and non-4K content sources also tend to look richer, with superior color palettes and great dynamic range, even if they don’t compare to how beautiful native HDR 4K video sources look.

Furthermore, the color performance of the KS8500 is definitely superior. This TV manages to hand out 10-bit HDR color that outperforms even the color palettes we saw in the 2015 SUHD TVs. While Samsung has been a bit quiet about this TV’s Rec.2020 color performance (it goes no higher than about 72%), the TV does deliver superb DCI-P3 performance with 93% of the DCI-P3 color space covered. The 10-bit color in the TV also means that gradation between tones is far smoother and more realistic, with 1.06 billion color values being possible instead of the 16.8 million that come with 8-bit color.

Finally, we should also mention that the KS8500 comes with a native 120Hz refresh rate that’s about the standard for premium 4K TVs in 2015 and 2016. Samsung also adds in a spec for what they call Motion Rate 240Hz, which is basically a type of motion interpolation addition to the native refresh technology, and while it does improve motion in onscreen video somewhat, the visual effect created might not be to everyone’s liking.

On a last note, we’d also like to add that the curved screen of the KS8500 is a gimmick. This is something we’ve covered in detail before on this website and we hold to the opinion that screen curvature in any normal-sized 4K TV and in any TV within the size ranges of the KS8500 (49 to 65 inches) will not in any way feel more immersive through a slightly screen curving. On the other hand, the curvature can be detrimental in how it affects viewing angles, light reflection off the display and in how it makes mounting the TV to a wall a bit more cumbersome.

Connectivity

The connectivity specs of the KS8500 are pretty much the standard issue for what you’ll get in most 2016 4K TVs and in all of the SUHD models. They’re essentially identical to the specs of the 2015 SUHD models as well.

This means a total of 4 HDMI 2.0a ports with full HDCP 2.2 and HEVC/VP9 support along with HDR encoding capacity (what HDMI 2.0a is all about). Furthermore, the KS8500 comes with 3 USB 2.0 ports, an Ethernet port and built-in WiFi for streaming content to and from mobile devices in non-4K resolutions or music content you want to send to the TV itself.

Samsung also offers the One Connect box for its SUHD TVs, which externalizes all connectivity ports into a single device that can be upgraded easily as new connection and HDMI standards come out.

Pricing

The KS8500 sells in three sizes, with a 49 inch, 55 inch and 65 inch model available. The cheapest of these is the 49 inch model at $1,699.99, followed by the 55 inch at $1,997.99 and then the 65 inch edition for a not-so affordable $2,997.99.

Check the Price of the Samsung KS8500 Curved 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2016 Model) on Amazon

5.0 - 1 Reviews


Not so Great

As we’d covered in detail above, the KS8500 suffers from a few notable weaknesses. First among these is the lack of 3D support of any kind. This is followed by poor viewing angles to the VA panel technology Samsung used for these TVs. Then, there is the fact that the brand still won’t give its premium SUHD models full-array backlighting across the board and only reserves it for the flagship edition, even though a brand like Vizio can manage FALD technology in all of its 2016 P-Series TVs.

Positives

• Superb HDR quality
• Very high peak brightness
• Some solid Tizen smart OS improvements
• One sexy looking TV
• Remarkable color performance
• Very deep black levels
• Great contrast

Negatives

• VA panel causes poor viewing angles
• No 3D support
• No USB 3.0
• Still no Full-array LED backlighting
• Curved screen adds $200 to price without a point

Editor Rating
 
Features
A

 
Quality
A-

 
User Friendliness
A-

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
B+

Total Score
A-

Hover To Rate
User Rating
 
Features
B+

 
Quality
B+

 
User Friendliness
B+

 
Connectivity
B+

 
Price
B

User Score
177 ratings
B+

You have rated this

Bottom Line
 

The bottom line for the KS8500 is that this is one excellent HDR 4K LCD TV with some superb brightness, rich contrast and great color settings. I n comparison to almost any 2015 SUHD TV, the KS8500 wins out and only the 2015 SUHD JS9500 offers comparable or better performance . Furthermore, This TV is definitely one of the best premium (but not flagship) LCD models for 2016 that we’ve seen so far, along with the rest of its SUHD cousins for the year. However, you can probably still get more value for your money if you go one of Vizio’s 2016 P-Series models.

Check the Price of the Samsung KS8500 Curved 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2016 Model) on Amazon

5.0 - 1 Reviews

 
16 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • Ben Ballard
    April 19, 2016 at 2:25 am

    The Vizio P-Series “TV’s” cannot be sold in the UK as a “TV” as it has no integral tuner to pick up TV broadcast signals. Under the UK trade descriptions act it can only be sold as a 4K monitor. Any attempt to sell a TV that doesn’t pick up TV broadcasts (effectively NOT fit for purpose as per advertised) would result in corporate prosecution for misrepresentation of a product to the general public. The UK general public are shying away from multiple boxes for multiple purposes and are looking to consolidate their TV viewing and personal digital device experiences into one slimmed down unit, which is why I’m seeing a rise in the favour of Android TV systems such as Sony’s.

    Which is why I’m surprised and a little disappointed with Samsung chucking a connect box into the fray? With the box slimdown of the general public (freeview boxes and Sky boxes) and the ineveitable de-cluttering of the public’s TV stand, why then have Samsung decided to include an extra box when all the connections can be made internally within the TV? Sony do it with the same amount of HDMI and USB ports, Panasonic and LG also do it. This is even more confusing when you consider that a lot of UK consumers (plus other International areas) are wall mounting their TV’s (and soundbars) – thus getting rid of the TV stand totally (no Freeview box/TV tuner to take into account). With the connect box it means you have to still keep the stand, which kind of defeats the purpose of the general public wall mounting their TV or having a professional media install done by a 3rd party?

    As for the TV itself? Another disappointing reveal in the fact that these brand new shiny models from Samsung aren’t full array backlighting, especially when they’re trying to capture the lead in a fast saturating market. 1450 Nits is impressive (rivalling Sony’s Backlight Master Drive system) for peak brightness output, however it needs better local micro dimming control that can only be properly done by a FALD system instead of the inferior one that they’ve included in this range of TV’s.

    There is nothing for me about this mid-range 4K TV that makes it stand out from other makes and models aimed at the same price point and feature point in the market. If consumers are going to be spending out over $1k or £1k on a TV they want something that is going to make it stand out more than an entry level 4K TV (such as the LG 49UF695V at £499).

    I think that this is a case of Samsung doing for doing’s sake and releasing a new TV range as a matter of course, instead of a matter of need.

    Reply

  • SWhaley
    April 21, 2016 at 4:40 am

    Hi guys-

    Was the 1000-1100 nits peak brightness a sustained level on a 100% screen test? Just trying to find a TV for and extremely bright area and if that is the case it will do the trick. When you have time please let me know….and if it is not 100%….Do you guys have any idea how it would perform on a 50% screen?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 21, 2016 at 11:47 am

      Hi there SWhaley. No. The 1000 nit brightness levels are confined to much smaller 30%-25% screen areas, with more than 1400 nits for an even smaller 10% window or smaller. At 50% the TV delivers no more than about 650 nits. This is still superb but not quite what you’re looking for it seems. I’d suggest waiting to see how the KS9800 performs for truly elevated brightness. If Samsung can deliver the above with only edge-lit LED arrays in the 2016 SUHD TVs, their full-array KS9800 flagship TV should perform spectacularly. We’ll be reviewing it as soon as we can.

      Reply

  • Alan R
    May 28, 2016 at 10:59 am

    This review of the KS8000/8500 Samsung indicates that the VA panel is inferior to the IPS.

    David Katzmeier of CNET, in reviewing the new Vizio P Series 55 inch, which has an IPS panel where the others (in the P Series) have VA panels criticizes the 55 inch BECAUSE it has an IPS panel saying it has “worse image quality than VA” http://www.cnet.com/products/vizio-p-series-review-2016/2/

    So what gives ?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 3, 2016 at 2:08 am

      Hello Alan, the inclusion of that small section has been removed in fact. Overall VA is superior to IPS in terms of image quality and how well contrast renders as well as black levels. The one thing we do concretely give IPS panels over VA is their superior viewing angle capacity.

      Reply

  • Zaheed
    June 30, 2016 at 3:01 am

    Hi guys.
    I currently have 2015 JS9000 tv and planing to upgrade to KS8500. Am I gonna see any significant difference in picture quality because of HDR1000? Does HDR makes normal standard 1080p video looks better and sharper than JS9000? I understand the concept of HDR but I am little confused. Does the HDR function only works when I am watching a HDR content or it also makes regular 1080p video looks brighter with more details? You know there are hardly any content that offer HDR these days. At the end is ti worth it to upgrade from JS9000 to KS8500?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 30, 2016 at 8:46 am

      Hello Zaheed, you absolutely should see a positive difference in overall picture quality with an upgrade to the KS8500. Color gamut quality will be about the same between the two TVs but the KS-Series SUHD TVs offer far superior peak brightness and better contrast and black quality. This is something I am sure of unless the new KS unit you buy is somehow defective or poorly calibrated.

      As for your second question, no, HDR will not display with upscaled 1080p or non-HDR 4K content on your TV. the content and TV display both have to be HDR-Capable and the content itself needs to come with metadata that sends a message to an HDR TV in order to display it correctly in full dynamic range. Something similar applies to color. There are however technologies being developed for making all content viewable in HDR on an HDR TV.

      On the other hand, the wide color coverage and higher peak brightness and deeper black levels of the KS8500 do indeed impart a superior level of picture quality to ordinary content, just not to the same degree as they do to full HDR content sources (which are still somewhat limited).

      Reply

  • Andy
    July 15, 2016 at 5:55 am

    I’m planning on upgrading from my 7 year old first gen Samsung LED TV. I’m deciding whether this (KS 8 series) or LG’s UH 8 series. I consider the LG because IPS’s wide viewing angle is a feature I very fond of. Also their short input lag makes console gaming on the screen a very enjoyable experience. I want an opinion on how the Samsung set performs compare to the LG. I understand that VA produces better PQ in general, but I just want to know how bad is the viewing angle? Also how does console gaming on the Samsung set? Lastly, is it a huge issue that only USB 2.0 is supported? Because I plan to rip some Blu-rays to a USB stick to watch it on the new TV. Is the bandwidth gonna be enough for future 4K videos?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 16, 2016 at 2:38 pm

      Hey there Andy. Basically, despite the lack of wide IPS viewing angles in the KS8000, i’d still recommend it over the UH8500 model, which is the main UH8 series LCD TV from LG. The viewing angles in the KS8000 are more limited but they’re also not that bad considering the great visual specs the TV puts out. Only if you move off beyond about 25 degrees from dead center will you start to note some defects. This isn’t so bad overall. Furthermore, the color pefromance in the DCI-P3 spectrum of the KS8000 is at least 5% better, whicch is enough to be visible to the naked eye, and the KS8000 offers slightly better local dimming. More importantly, the KS8000 delivers nearly perfect black uniformity, peak brightness that’s almost three times higher than that of the UH8500 and a far superior overall contrast level.

      Finally, the KS8000 is actually the better 4K TV for console gaming and use as a PC monitor as well. For console gaming, its input lag is a full third lower than it is on the UH8500. Also, as for your USB 3.0 question, no the KS8000 doesn’t offer the spec, only USB 2.0. the same applies for all of the 2016 KS models we’ve looked at so far. The One Connect box for these TVs also doesn’t include USB 3. However, this is a minor issue. It may be slower by a certain margin but USB 2.0 will still let you watch HD Blu-ray rips on a USB stick, not in 4K resolution though since neither USB 2 or USB 3 can handle UHD resolution anyhow.

      Reply

  • Xavier
    July 20, 2016 at 3:56 pm

    Hi, the KS8000 & KS8500 have legs that are very far apart, on larger models like 60″ or 65″ that could mean they won’t fit on most TV stands. I’ve read somewhere that the 60″ & 65″ KS8000 have alternate positions for the legs which are closer together, does the KS8500 (60″ or 65″) also have such alternate positions? Thanks.

    Reply

  • Andre
    August 22, 2016 at 9:12 pm

    I just got one of those. As a matter of fact it’s my second UHD Samsung. My other one being a 7100 3D model. Two things I don’t like about this model 8500 that I like better on the 7100. The first one being the ability to see the resolution of what is playing on the tv. The second looks like the plex tv app has a lot more features on the 7100 model. Neither one makes sense to me since the 8500 is supposedly a higher end model. If anyone knows how to resolve either one. Let me know.

    Reply

  • Al
    September 21, 2016 at 11:42 pm

    I have the KS8500 and it seems to be having light leaks from all corners…. is this normal

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 23, 2016 at 10:18 am

      Hi Al. No this is not normal in our experience. What I suspect is that you have a defective unit and should contact either Samsung or the retailer which sold you the TV for warranty repair or unit replacement. The KS8500 as we reviewed it suffered from extremely solid black uniformity with virtually no detectable light leak anywhere on the screen.

      Reply

  • Andrew
    December 1, 2016 at 11:43 pm

    Stephen,

    I just ordered the ks8500 thanks to your reviews. I really enjoy reading your fair and unbiased opinions. You sir are very knowledgeable and I trust what you and your team says at 4k.com

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 2, 2016 at 12:42 pm

      Thank you Andrew. I sincerely try to give the most even possible opinion of different 4K TVs, regardless of brand. The compliment is much appreciated.

      Reply

  • 8500 owner
    March 24, 2017 at 11:25 am

    I have this. The biggest problem and probably the only one (I’m not a videophile) is the software. They claim they forced ads were removed or can be opted out of, yes now your tv has ads like the internet does. There is a. On removable sponsored ad in the main home menu “hub” that you use to select apps or change inputs, etc. They erroneously will tell you it can be removed if you opt out yet hours on the phone and letting them remotely access my tv proves that’s not true. They even blamed Verizon and my Amazon Fire TV stick for inserting the ads into the tv software! I guess they hope the average joe won’t understand that’s impossible.

    Second, the apps don’t work reliably. I have to unplug the tv regularly to get the apps to work. They either freeze or the remote doesn’t control them.

    Lastly the tv let’s you program the remote to your devices to use universally yet randomly the guide button on the remote stops working when trying to control my FiOS box.

    Oh and the thing about the full array backlight is accurate, it would make the tv look a lot better than edge kit because you can see that there aren’t nearly enough dimming zones as there should be.

    Other than that the tv is great.

    Reply

Leave a Response 

Features

Quality

User Friendliness

Connectivity

Price