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Samsung KS8000 SUHD 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV Review (UN49KS8000,UN55KS8000, UN65KS8000)

by on April 9, 2016
Details
 
Manufacture
Overview

Price: $1,797.99 - $2,799.99 on Amazon

Samsung’s 4K SUHD HDR TVs with quantum dot color technology in its second generation name are here and they are looking like excellent purchase choices, as we saw with our earlier review of the top-shelf KS9000 2016 SUHD HDR 4K TV. Here we’re going to look carefully at the KS8000, which is one of the “lower-end” cousins of the KS9000 and KS9500 flagship models. In the case of this particular model however, the “lower-end” aspect is definitely muted, with mostly minor differences between the core display and smart TV specs in the KS8000 and its pricier cousins the KS9500/KS9000 TVs.

Most notably, a few extra features for local dimming, motion rate technology and speaker power are what’s a bit weaker in the case of this particular model. The majority of the other differences are either aesthetic or superficial. Furthermore, unlike the KS9500, some versions of the KS9000 (apparently) and the KS8500, the KS8000 is a flat screen 4K TV, something which we ourselves appreciate more than the gimmick that is screen curvature in normal-sized 4K TVs of any kind.

The Good

Unlike the KS9000 2016 SUHD TV, which could mostly be considered a close successor to last year’s JS9000 SUHD model, the KS8000 doesn’t quite have a straightforward 2015 counterpart. However, this is largely unimportant anyhow since this particular lower-priced model easily outshines 2015 SUHD versions like the JS8500 and even the highly acclaimed JS9000 in terms of some crucial display specs.

Despite its smaller price, the KS8000 still offers the same essential HDR technology as its pricier 2016 cousins and easily outdoes any of the 2015 SUHD models (except maybe the flagship JS9500) in terms of how well it renders peak brightness and black levels. Other key features like quantum dot color, which was called Nano Crystal color in 2015’s SUHD TVs, are superb in this particular TV and arguably perform as well as they do in even the 2016 flagship SUHD TV, the JS9500.

Furthermore, like all of the 2016 SUHD TVs, the KS8000 complies with the “Ultra HD Premium” standards for both color and HDR from the UHD Alliance , so regardless of this model’s lower price, you’re going to get 10-bit color, superb 1000+ nit peak brightness and some deep rich black tones by LCD TV standards. This is a major bonus of all the 2016 SUHD TVs which was lacking in the 2015 lineup, even though some of those older models did have a lower grade species of HDR technology in their displays as well.

Additionally, the KS8000 benefits from a mix of Samsung’s better than ever before upscaling technology for non-4K content, augmented still further from 2015 by an ability to also impart exceptional brightness and black level enhancements to conventional non-4K SDR video sources of most types. In other words, all that majority of Full HD, 720p and even some well-mastered SD content you watch on the KS8000 will likely look much richer and crisper than it would on any normal HDTV or even on many 4K TVs for that matter.

Some other final strengths of the KS8000 which we also have to like include a great functionality in its Game mode, a better than ever Tizen smart TV platform with great intuitiveness and ease-of-use and a physical design that’s quite beautiful, front and back, with elegance and minimal quarter inch bezeling along the display edges.

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The bad

On the other hand, being a far from completely perfect 4K LCD TV, the KS8000 has its share of flaws, though none of them are in any way major deal breakers by any means.

For starters, while some consumers won’t care about this it all, other potential users might seriously be bothered by the fact that Samsung hasn’t included any 3D support of either the passive or active type in any of its 2016 SUHD TVs, the KS8000 being no exception. If you’re used to enjoying some 3D in your home entertainment and can’t live without the technology in your 4K TV, stay away from the 2016 SUHD models then.

Secondly, like its pricier cousin the KS9000, the KS8000 also comes with problems with viewing angles. We personally don’t think the angle viewing is as bad as some have claimed it to be but it’s certainly not great, with the TV’s non-IPS display panel causing a notable amount of color and contrast loss at wider off-center angles. Additionally, some of the display “enhancement” technologies crammed into this and other newer 4K TVs, like Samsung’s AutoMotion Plus, don’t so much improve picture quality as they simply saturate it with odd gimmicks that sound better in marketing language than they do in actual practice. It’s a shame that these technologies are often turned on by default, but it’s often better to manually deactivate them after taking the KS8000 out of its box.

We should also note that the KS8000, being the “lower-end” edition of the new 2016 SUHD KS models, does not feature the slightly superior “Supreme UHD Dimming” or “Supreme Motion Rate 240Hz” technologies of the KS9500 or KS9000. These are minor absences though and even without Supreme UHD Dimming, the TV still performs superbly at local dimming and contrast richness.

Finally, while the contrast on the KS8000 is as good as it is in most 2016 HDR TVs and quite a bit better than almost any levels of HDR we’ve seen in nearly any 2015 4K UHD TV, LCD technology still has a ways to go before it matches the perfect blacks of OLED TVs like LG’s 4K models. The KS8000 may excel at brightness but neither it nor any other LCD 4K TV can yet match what OLED offers for precision local dimming and perfect black.

Final Thoughts

Our final thoughts on the KS8000 are the same as those we had for the KS9000. If you haven’t yet bought an HDR TV and were thinking of going for one of Samsung’s SUHD models, then definitely go for this one or its slightly more expensive KS9500/KS9000 cousins. They’re a definite improvement over their 2015 cousins in terms of color and contrast display. However, if you already have a 2015 SUHD or other high-end 4K TV and don’t care too much about having the latest in “Ultra HD Premium” HDR technology quite yet, you can forego this particular model comfortably. It’s nearly identical to its 2015 cousins when it comes to non-display specs.

Specs

• Screen size: 48.5 diagonal inches, 54.6 diagonal inches (UN55KS8000FXZA) and 64.5 diagonal inches (UN65KS8000FXZA)
• Smart TV: Tizen OS, Smart Hub, Smart TV with Apps and Full Web Browser
• HEVC (H.265) Included: Yes
• VP9 Included. Yes
• HD to UHD upscaling: Yes
• HDCP 2.2 Compliance: Yes
• Refresh Rate: 120Hz native refresh rate (Motion Rate 120Hz)
• Screen Lighting: Edge-lit LED backlighting with Supreme Dimming tech
• Resolution: 3,840 x 2,160 pixels UHD
• Wireless Connectivity: Yes, includes both built-in WiFi and Ethernet port
• Remotes: Samsung smart button remote
• Connectivity: 4 HDMI 2.0a ports, 3 USB ports, 1 Ethernet port, 1 Audio Out, 1 Digital Audio Out
• Sound: 40W (10W x 2, Woofer 10W x 2) Down Firing w/Bass Reflex (2.1CH) speakers with Dolby Digital Plus
• Contrast Ratio: 4,998:1
• Black Level maximum: 0.022 cd/m2
• Other Display Features: Auto Depth Enhancer and Ultra Clear Panel technology
• Processor: Quad-core

Highlights

Quantum Dot Color: Like its 2015 SUHD cousins, the KS8000 and the rest of the 2016 SUHD models all offer Quantum Dot color technology once again. Samsung has changed its name from NanoCrystal Color to the more descriptive Quantum Dot Color this year but its essentially the same system of ultra-thin layers of quantum dot crystal particles inserted between LED backlight and LCD screen for polarizing light from the LEDs themselves into different broad color patterns, which then further augment the color palette created by the KS8000’s pixels for deeper vibrancy and color realism. The QD color technology of the KS8000 nicely complements the color enhancements of the TV’s HDR specs.

UHD Premium High Dynamic Range: All of the 2016 SUHD TVs offer up HDR capacity that matches the standards set out by the UHD Alliance. This means that with the KS8000 and all of the other TVs in the series, you get your hands on peak brightness levels of 1000 nits, rich black levels of at least 0.05 nits (great by LCD TV standards) and full-blown 10-bit color processing. Of the 2015 SUHD TVs, only the JS9500 was able to match these brightness and black level specs, with the other HDR SUHD TVs like the JS9000 and JS8500 offering a much more limited form of HDR. This is in fact the single most stand-out aspect of the KS8000 and its cousins and what most makes them worth buying over their 2015 counterparts. HDR1000 is the main name that Samsung has given to this technology, though it also includes enhancements like Peak Illuminator Pro and Ultra Black, as well as UHD Dimming technology.

Peak Illuminator Pro and Ultra Black: While not quite as great as the Peak Illuminator Ultimate found in the KS9500 and KS9000 TVs, the Peak Illuminator Pro of the KS8000 is what most works at creating the peaks of nit brightness the TV is capable of. With the KS9000 we saw spot peak brightness hit as many as 1450 nits thanks to Peak Illuminator Ultimate and in the KS8000, while not reaching quite that high, spot brightness can still hit well above 1100 nits. In any case, this is the minimal peak brightness standard for effective “premium” HDR from the UHD Alliance. As for Ultra Black, it works with the TV’s UHD Dimming technology to create the riches possible black levels currently possible in an LCD TV like this model. In the case of the KS8000, those blacks are good indeed, capable of reaching below 0.05 nits of darkness.

Smart TV Improvement:s The 2016 version of the Tizen Smart TV OS is definitely at least a bit better than it was in 2015, and we liked the 2015 Smart Platform, considering it to be the second best on the market today. Now, in the KS8000 and other 2016 SUHD models, Tizen offers a slightly more intuitive user interface, superior point and click capacity in the still somewhat limited “smart” remote and we think that the quad core processor for this year has done a good job of enhancing the speed at which the whole smart platform operates.

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Visual Specs

Quite frankly, all of the occasional above complaints about it aside, the visual specs of the KS8000 are nothing short of excellent, not just for an LCD TV but also even when compared to OLED if its peak brightness is taken into account.

For starters, the KS8000 has that handy Ultra HD Premium certification from the UHD Alliance behind it, so you can be fairly sure that it will deliver on the HDR quality for both contrast levels and color realism. However, it’s one thing to read that and its another thing to actually see the quality of the KS8000’s (and other 2016 SUHD TVs) high dynamic range at work when compared to what was available in the 2015 SUHD TVs. With possible peak brightness of more than 1100 nits and black levels capable of going as low as 0.02 nits against average white levels of 98 cd/m2 and even manage blacks as dark as 0.009 nits with UHD local dimming technology activated as well, this TV really creates a wide amount of dynamic range scales for all sorts of fine degrees of bright and dark in onscreen content. The resulting effect is stunning in native 4K ultra HD content with HDR mastering built into it and the HDR specs in the screen also work at making non-HDR or even non-4K content look quite impressive.

Furthermore, color performance in the KS8000 is downright great. The 2016 SUHD models have all seen their color capacities improve from how they were in 2015’s SUHD TVs and those older models were already excellent at creating vibrant color. While Samsung has been a bit tricky in not mentioning this TV’s Rec.2020 color bin coverage (it sits at only about 72%), the TV does still effectively cover more than 93% of the DCI-P3 color space and this is good enough for HDR certification and for the ability to genuinely claim that it offers up 10-bit color, with its 1.06 billion values instead of the 16.8 million of 8-bit color.

We should also note that the native refresh rate of the KS8000 is the same 120Hz of all the other SUHD TVs. Samsung has gone ahead with a “Motion Rate 240” label and in the KS9000 models it even claims “Supreme Motion Rate 240”, though we can hardly tell a difference between the two in action. While not as exaggerated as we’ve seen before, these added artificial refresh rate claims don’t impress us all that much. Native refresh is the important thing to keep in mind.

Finally, as we’d mentioned earlier, the upscaling technology in the KS8000 is downright superb, and now offers the added twist of working to enhance both non-4K content wonderfully but also native 4K content without HDR, since the TV not only upscales lower resolutions but also gives SDR video sources a slight to moderate makeover in contrast quality. The whole 2016 SUHD lineup does this well.

Connectivity

Connectivity specs in the KS8000 and the rest of its 2016 family of 4K TVs is just about identical to what was offered in the 2015 models. There is a total of 4 HDMI 2.0a ports with full HDCP 2.2, HDR and HEVC/VP9 capacity. There is also the added benefit of Samsung’s One Connect mini box available for this TV, which externalizes connectivity ports for easy replacement as new standards come along. The KS8000 also offers 3 USB ports and in this we see ourselves disappointed with the company for continuing to offer only USB 2.0 even in 2016. Would it really cost them that much more time and money to upgrade those ports to the more powerful USB 3.0?

Finally, there are the built-in WiFi and Ethernet connectivity of the KS8000, both of which are important for sharing content from the web to other devices and making sure the TV’s smart features, smart TV content apps and full web browsing capabilities all work smoothly.

Also, the KS8000 offers full compatibility with the H.265 and VP9 4K content compression codecs, meaning that access to pretty much all of today’s main sources of streaming web-based 4K content is a given as long as you have an internet connection of 15 to 25 Mbps.

Pricing

The Samsung KS8000 2016 SUHD TV sells on Amazon.com for $1,497.99 for the 55 inch model, $2,297.99 for the 65 inch model and for some odd reason, the 49 inch model has no price or availability listings either on the Amazon website or the Samsung TV website either. For the Curved version (KS8500) Click Here for Review.


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Not so Great

To quickly summarize, the KS8000’s main defects are minor, consisting mostly of a lack of 3D support of any kind, poor viewing angles due to the lack of IPS Panel technology, and black performance that isn’t quite as impressive as we’d like in a 2016 SUHD TV. We also wish Samsung would add in USB 3.0 ports to their TVs and the addition of full-array LED backlighting would have been a great feature too.

Positives

• Excellent HDR specs
• Superb peak brightness
• Tizen has improved
• Physically beautiful
• Solid color performance

Negatives

• Weak viewing angles
• No 3D support
• Lacks USB 3.0
• We’d like full-array LED backlighting

Editor Rating
 
Features
A

 
Quality
A

 
User Friendliness
A-

 
Connectivity
A+

 
Price
A

Total Score
A-

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User Rating
 
Features
B

 
Quality
B+

 
User Friendliness
B

 
Connectivity
B

 
Price
B

User Score
511 ratings
B

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Bottom Line
 

The Bottom Line for the KS8000 is the same as it was in our review of the KS9000. This is an excellent HDR 4K LCD TV, if you haven’t bought such a TV yet, then definitely go for this or the other 2016 SUHD models instead of for their 2015 cousins. However, if you already own a high-end 2015 4K TV and don’t care too much about the absolute latest in HDR technology, then you’re probably just fine with your existing TV for now.

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127 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • CRC
    April 9, 2016 at 8:00 pm

    Is it possible that they are not going to release a 49″ TV? At the moment, it is MIA.

    Also, can you quantify the poor off axis viewing angle. At what angle do you notice a difference? I saw one today on the display floor and It didn’t seem very noticeable, but that was with store lighting, saturated bright source content, and some horrible settings. Properly adjusted for a movie in a dark room, at what angle will I see the image start to wash out?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 12, 2016 at 1:10 pm

      Hello there CRC, the off-axis viewing angle starts to get a bit poor, with a considerable drop in contrast in particular as of about 65 degrees from directly in front of the TV screen. And yes, as you say, this can be affected by content quality and ambient lighting, but only slightly. Furthermore, oddly enough, the KS8000 doesn’t come with an IPS screen. It uses VA technology instead I believe. This is what negatively affects its viewing angles.

      As for the 49 inch model of the KS8000, one is already available from online retailers and in-store as well I’d assume. We focused more on the larger models here but have edited to include mention of the 49 inch edition.

      Reply

      • CRC
        April 15, 2016 at 12:52 pm

        Thanks for the reply. Yes, I am starting to see the 49″ listed as well. I have decided to just get one and bring it home to try out. If the off viewing angle is not acceptable (but I expect that it will be) then I will return it. I would prefer to buy it from Costco, but it is not available there. From past experience, do you know how long it takes for Costco to carry new models of TV’s? They carry the JS8500 online, so I think it likely they will carry the KS8000 online also. Of course there is the possibility they will never carry it. How long do you think I would have to wait?

        Reply

  • Jason
    April 10, 2016 at 10:39 am

    I’m trying to choose between this TV and the LG 55uh8500, I don’t watch too much tv in the dark. I game and have a 4k roku with Amazon and netflix accounts. Also I watch cable, and noticed little comments in the LGS review about upconverting? Will likely be in a well lit by day and night apartment living room. I notice a big price difference between the two units. I’m also not sure if I should take into account the HDR format war. I do have a Samsung tab/phone but I know LG makes nice products too.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 12, 2016 at 12:54 pm

      Hi there Jason, Here is a repost of my review to your same comment in the UH8500 review. Thanks:

      The price issue is something to consider but if you’re looking for superior display quality, I’d recommend the KS8000 over the UH8500. LG has improved their 2016 LCD 4K TVs a lot from the lackluster 2015 models but they’re still not as good as Samsung’s SUHD TVs for this year. The UH8500 still suffers from weaker contrast than we’d like and its color performance is affected as a result. Furthermore, for an HDR TV (which the UH8500 also is) it’s performance is only decent at best, while the HDR quality of the KS8000 is superb.

      Reply

      • Ken Hielscher
        April 30, 2016 at 9:10 am

        Stephen
        Thanks for your candor and responses, as I am considering the KS8000 versus the (2015 mdl) 7090 unit.
        The 7090 is available at Sams club for around 1098 versus the 2800 price of the KS8000. The cost difference was driving me to the 7090.
        AS I do not own a 4K unit this expanded review/discussion just may persuade me to go with the newer model…your thoughts

        Reply

  • Mike
    April 10, 2016 at 4:46 pm

    So would you choose the js8500 for $400 cheaper over the ks8000 or go with the ks8000? I just want the better TV and the cost between the two doesn’t matter either way.

    Reply

    • CRC
      April 11, 2016 at 12:22 pm

      Unless you want 3D, the ks8000 is better is almost every other way. It strikes me as the TV the js8500 was trying to be, but just couldn’t quite make it.

      Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 12, 2016 at 12:50 pm

      Hello Mike, in that case you should definitely go with the KS8000 if cost is not your main concern. This TV is completely the superior of the two in the quality of its display technology, brightness, dimming and the quality of its high dynamic range most of all, which is the most notable improvement. It’s Tizen smart TV platform has also been improved and we think the color performance of the KS8000 is a step up from what was the case in the JS8500.

      Reply

    • Jennifer
      July 23, 2016 at 3:56 pm

      I have the JS8500 and it’s awesome TV. We tested side by side with my Friend”s KS8000 and we found the HDR looking the same on 4K UHD bluray movies like Allegiant Chappie The Revenant and test patterns plus the JS8500 has better automotion. We tested the TVs in low lit rooms.

      Reply

      • Talaat
        January 6, 2017 at 6:58 am

        hello jennefer , is the same picture you noticed on both ks8000 and js8500 only for hdr 4k movies or also for sdr 4k movies and 1080p and 720p movies

        Reply

  • Roger
    April 19, 2016 at 7:43 am

    I have heard concerns about light bleed in this model. Can you comment on this? I have been looking at the LG Oled for quite some time but this is much better for my budget and since I mostly watch satellite tv and play ps4 I may not need to spend the extra money.

    Reply

  • Mick Bracey
    April 25, 2016 at 4:01 am

    Hi Stephen
    Where would you rate the ks8000 against the Sony xd93

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 25, 2016 at 1:50 pm

      Hello there Mick. Between the KS8000 and the X930D from Sony, i’d argue that the superior TV is the Samsung model. Thier 2016 SUHD TVs truly are superb performers and the Sony models less so, though they’re great in most ways and the X940D in particular is excellent. For your KS8000 vs. X930D question, I’d say that the Samsung TV offers the far superior contrast level and a much higher quality of black level. It’s also a brighter TV on the whole. In fact, neither the X850D or the X930D seem to always effectively manage the minimum 1100 nit peak brightness of Ultra HD Premium standards. Don’t get me wrong, the X930D is a great 4K TV with excellent motion specs, superb color performance and a smart TV platform we really like but in general the display quality of the KS8000 is both brighter and darker, with better overall contrast and the same high quality of motion control specs.

      Reply

  • Orlando
    April 27, 2016 at 12:28 pm

    I am debating on one of the following TVs

    1. Vizio P-Seriess P55-C1
    or
    2. Samsung KS8000 55″
    or
    3. Sony XBR55850D

    Which would you choose and why? I likely will not be playing XBOX on it, but will watch Comcast Cable, lots of sports, mainly football and lots of 720p and 1080p movies.

    Sound is not important as I have a Sony 780 soundbar and 3D is NOT important. Picture quality and clarity are most important tome.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 29, 2016 at 6:26 pm

      Hello Orlando,

      Between the three you mention, i’d definitely go for the KS8000 if price isn’t your biggest concern. On the other hand, I’d recommend the 55 inch P-Series if you’d like to save a bit of money and still receive an excellent picture quality experience. The 2016 SUHD TVs are great across the board and even the lower priced KS8000 and KS8500 (Which have nearly the same specs with the only real distinction being a lack of curvature in the KS8000) are some of the best 4K LCD TVs we’ve seen in 2016. Overall they’re somewhat superior to the P-Series though the Vizio model is also ecellennt with some fine 10-bit color and the second best HDR specs we’ve seen in 2016 so far.

      The Sony model isn’t bad either but it’s simply not as good a 4K TV overall as either the KS8000 or P-Series. In summary. for the best among those you list, go for the KS8000 but if you want to save a bit of money, go for the P-Series for a nearly as good picture quality.

      Reply

  • CRC
    April 28, 2016 at 3:31 pm

    I’m seeing some user comments complaining about the motion blur on the KS8000. I watch a lot of motorcycle racing and am concerned that I might be disappointed with this TV. Would the JS7000 be better for watching motorcycle racing? I’ve been waiting for the 49KS8000 to become available, but not that I can purchase it, I’m afraid that maybe it isn’t the right TV for me.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 29, 2016 at 6:52 pm

      Hello CRC, the motion control technologies in the KS8000 model we reviewed all show as being truly excellent or at the very least very good. In the case of motion blur, we noticed excellent performance with both native 4K content and upscaled HD video action. I strongly doubt that this will be a problem in the KS8000. It performs better than the 2015 JS7000 on this front in fact.

      Reply

  • Mr Anderson
    April 28, 2016 at 8:22 pm

    Great review as always, you guys are the best with up to date coverage on the newest tv’s. I’m considering this tv but I’m a little concerned about the edge lit local dimming. I have an older tv with lots of blooming and flash lighting on the edges when dark scenes come up on movies and shows. It’s very distracting and just recently turned it off completely, although it did hurt my picture quality. Is there blooming and distracting edge lighting issues with the ks8000? We watch mostly in a dim lit living room at night (blue rays and 1080p content). Thanks for your help!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      April 29, 2016 at 6:50 pm

      Hello Mr. Anderson. No, in our experience the KS8000 does not produce issues with light blooming even when the screen is completely black. In fact, the black uniformity of this TV is excellent from what we’ve been able to observe. Of course it is also always possible that some specific units offer a different experience and consumers mention this on review sites or pages like Amazon.com.

      Reply

  • Jacks jack
    April 30, 2016 at 2:15 am

    Hi! Can it be hung on the wall? Thanks, Jack

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 1, 2016 at 3:59 am

      Hello Jack, of course it can. All 4K TVs from major brands are mountable to walls and the flat screen of the KS8000 lends itself much better to this than a curved display like that of the KS8500 or the KS9500 does.

      Reply

  • J Dennehy
    May 9, 2016 at 4:04 pm

    Stephen, I just bought a Samsung UN49KS8000 4K Ultra HD Smart LED TV (2016)…..

    Is it safe and is my privacy at risk? I don’t want anyone to have access to what I do or say when I’m enjoying a TV show. Please provide me with a definitive answer, before I return the TV.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 9, 2016 at 8:51 pm

      Hello there J Dennehy, all smart TVs are theoretically capable of being hacked though its very unlikely. What is likely however is that Samsung is monitoring your viewing preferences and online activity as conducted through the TV and its apps or browser. This information is of course available to Samsung but it can also be shared with third parties and likely is, since this is a common practice among 4K smart TV makers. I will get back to you in a secondary reply here shortly with further details about this and information about disabling these aspects of Tizen where possible.

      Reply

  • Keith
    May 10, 2016 at 10:31 am

    Hi Stephen. I just reluctantly returned a 65″ Vizio P-series because of the poor upscaling for 780p and some poor 1080p content and the not-quite-there interface which didn’t work well with my streaming setup (looks like it would play perfectly for cable/dish feeds), but the HD blacks were amazing. I’m now considering the KS8000. I was at a local Best Buy this weekend and was told there have a been a lot of returns with this model (though it seemed the salesman had an agenda in pushing the LG at me) and the ratings on Amazon are less than stellar. Have you gotten any negative buyer feedback? And do you think this edge lit model approaches the blacks of the fald P-series?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 11, 2016 at 10:41 pm

      Hi there Keith, Yes, the P-Series is noted (in our review of that model) for its less than stellar upscaling of 720p and SD content. However, it is a great TV in most other regards. Im suprised that you also had your unit upscale 1080p content badly. We didn’t note this at all but it is possible for it to vary from unit to unit to at least some degree.

      As for the KS8000, we have also kept track of some negative buyer reviews for the TV, particularly on Amazon.com but have not had any from readers on our site yet. That said, our personal impression of the TV and that of many other professional reviews is that the KS8000 overwhelmingly delivers a solid performance which is distinctly superior to the quality of Samsung’s own edge-lit 2015 4K SUHD TVs. I’d say that more than anything you should keep two points in mind:

      first, if at all possible, try to see the TV in action on a showroom floor display and ask to have it display more than one content source if possible
      Second, remember that out-of-the-box calibration can often be heavily different from custom calibration for your needs. That is to say that a TV whose picture doesn’t look great right after you unpack it can be made to deliver stunning display quality after a bit of tweaking in the display settings.

      Reply

  • Justin
    May 10, 2016 at 11:22 am

    Hello,

    So how does this TV compare to last year’s flagship JS9500? Just curious if not having the full array backlight hurts the KS8000 vs the JS9500 from last year?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 11, 2016 at 3:37 pm

      Hello Justin, Samsung seems to have truly improved the quality of their backlighting technology since 2015. Despite being an edge-it 4K TV, the KS8000 actually offers much higher levels of peak brightness than the Full-array JS9500 from 2015 and this is one impressive achievement. It means superior overall HDR and twice the contrast in the KS8000. On the other hand, the local dimming technology of the JS9500 is definitely a lot more precise in its performance. edge-lit in LCD TV just can’t beat a full-array LED backpanel even if it’s capable of brighter peak luminescence.

      Reply

  • Dan
    May 11, 2016 at 6:05 am

    I would love to know the difference between the Sony xbr850D and then Samsung ks8000 55inch,could you tell me which is the better of the two TVs

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 11, 2016 at 3:08 pm

      Hello Dan, There are many differences between the two TVs since they come from different brands but i’ll try to break down the relevant aspects here based on which TV offers superior performance:

      The KS8000 delivers a higher quality of contrast, which is in act at least twice as good as what we noted in the X850D. Furthermore, the delivery of its black uniformity is much better and in terms of peak brightness, the KS8000 blows the X850D out of the water by how much brighter its display is capable of getting since it can manage a peak brightness in a 2% window that’s almost 4 times as bright! In terms of black level, the KS8000 also beats the X850D but by a smaller margin. On the other hand, the X850D does deliver better color quality but since both TVs offer wide color gamut and 10-bit color, you’re not likely to notice the color quality difference between the KS8000 and the X850D with the naked eye

      The overall result of all these specs is that the KS8000 delivers a superior quality of display and much better HDR specs than the X850D. Sony’s decision to go for its own “4K HDR” standard instead of adapting UHD Alliance “Ultra HD Premium” standards seems to mask a sort of laziness about delivering really powerful high dynamic range specs more than anything, at least as far as the specs of thw X850D are concerned.

      As for smart TV, Samsung’s Tizen platform is a bit better but Sony’s Android TV is also great, so there is little difference at work here. Also, both TVs offer pretty much the same quantity and quality of connectivity specs.

      Bottom line, for superior display, go for the KS8000, without a doubt if you really want a higher quality of HDR in your TV display

      Reply

  • Vidar
    May 16, 2016 at 4:35 pm

    Any particular reason why the 75 inch model is not mentioned? UE75KS8005? I’ve been in the market for a 4k 70+ inch flat TV with rather high performance, and that release is the first I’ve found meeting the requirement

    Reply

  • Adam
    May 17, 2016 at 5:34 pm

    Thanks for the review, Stephen. I’m torn between the KS8000, Visio P 2016, and a 2016 LG OLED – the main usage will be console games and movies in a very dark room. The reasons I’m hesitant for each:

    1. With the OLED I’m unclear if burn-in could be a real issue (due to gaming). Seems like I get very different answers depending on who I ask.

    2. With the KS8000 is lack of Dolby Vision support, which means no HDR on Vudu and perhaps other future streaming services.

    3. With the P series, it’s simply that Visio hasn’t quite garnered the brand trust that the other two have. Their 2016 P series is very impressive, but I wonder how it will stand the test of time.

    Your input would be much appreciated!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 20, 2016 at 2:46 pm

      Hello there Adam, To answer your question as simply and succinctly as warranted: First, keep pricing in mind. The 2016 OLED 4K TVs are much more expensive than similarly sized KS8000 or Vizio P-Series LCD TVs. If price isn’t a concern, i’d probably say just go for the OLED, either the G6 or the E6 models (a bit cheaper). They without a doubt have the best picture quality among all the TVs you mention even if they have shown a couple of very minor flaws in isolated reviews (though we noted no display flaws in the G6 when we reviewed it).

      The OLED TVs of today (2015 and 2016 in particular) are much less likely to suffer from burn-in than older 2014 TVs or Plasma TVs were. This is something that has rarely been noted so far and LG claims to have solved the issue, though I suppose time will tell about their performance in a couple more years, especially that of the 2015 4K OLEDs.

      Yes, the KS8000 lacks Dolby support but the possibility of it being added in later is not at all low. Samsung seems to be waiting for Dolby Vision to garner more popularity and may, like Sony is planning, add in Dolby HDR support later in the year or in 2017. That said, the HDR10 standard-certified HDR specs of the KS8000 are excellent and we consider them to be better in their caliber to those of the Vizio P-Series.

      On the other hand, the Vizio TVs are definite performers and have become what we’d call a quality lineup of 4K TVs from our own reviewing and monitoring experience. So if you want to save a bit over the KS8000’s price and still get excellent display and HDR specs with wide color gamut, go for a Vizio P-Series TV in your preferred display size.

      Reply

  • sameer
    May 18, 2016 at 11:27 am

    I am little confused with your review. On one hand you have declared KS8000 better than 2015 line (lets say not considering js9500 as its FALD). but then you had given JS9000 much higher rating than KS8000. So which of the two is better overall, KS8000 or JS9000? I understand there may be some features better in one over other (like sports is better in JS) but if one had the option to buy either at the same exact price (getting js9000 for 1900 and KS8000 at 1900 too) then which one should one buy?

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 18, 2016 at 9:36 pm

      Hello Sameer. I apologize for the slight confusion but it can be best explained by the fact that we also take context into consideration. At the time we reviewed it, the JS9000 was one of the best LCD TVs of 2015 and deserved the high rating it got. However, rolling into 2016, with the new models, the final rating we give them is more in comparison to other 2016 4K TVs in their category. This is unavoidable and necessary since the 2015 TVs were excellent for their time (last year) but are now not as good as some of Samsung’s many new TVs for this year. To give another example that might explain it: The EG9600 was an A+ 4K OLED TV for 2015 but the 2016 OLED G6 which we also reviewed is an A+ 4K TV for this year. Now the G6 is obviously superior to the EG9600 in most of its specs even though both have the same letter grade for their respective years. The ratings are contextual in essence.

      That said, the JS9000 is still one excellent 4K HDR TV, it just doesn’t have quite as high a caliber of formalized HDR (by HDR10/UHD Alliance standards) as the KS8000.

      Reply

  • sharif
    May 19, 2016 at 6:01 pm

    I just purchased the 65kS8000. It was a toss up between that and the vizio p series. I’m a big gamer and own multiple consoles. So knowing vizio is better for gaming with lower input lag and great motion clarity. I did some research. HDMI 5 is the only input that has the great gaming specs. So unless you want to switch hdmi’s back and forth from ps4 to Xbox one I went with the k8000. All hdmi’s are rated the same so it’s a better gaming television for multiple consoles. My question is, am I right?

    Reply

    • Dan
      September 26, 2016 at 8:01 am

      Yes, in addition that people need to realize is that the HDMI 5 on the Vizio cannot support HDR/4K. That means anyone wanting then PS4 Pro, Xboxone S or Scorpio or even HDR on the vanilla PS4 cannot use the low input lag HDMI 5. That means your input lag will be 60ms + to get those features. That’s a deal breaker for me. I love my 65 KS800D. Great TV!

      Reply

  • Josh
    May 23, 2016 at 3:13 pm

    I can’t decide on the ks8000 or the ks8500

    which one do u suggest?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 23, 2016 at 8:03 pm

      Hey there Josh. Quite frankly, there is no real difference between them in terms of specs or display quality. There may be unit to unit variations since these can happen between any two TVs depending on calibration or some other manufacturing detail but the KS8500 and the KS8000 are essentially the same TV except that the 8500 comes with a curved display. As we’ve explained in detail in this post here, curvature is mostly a sales gimmick and will deliver no real added benefit to picture quality as far as we’ve ever noted. It can in fact be detrimental in some ways as we explain in our overview of curved vs. flat TVs.

      Reply

  • Isaiah
    May 26, 2016 at 8:42 am

    Hey Stephen, I have all but confirmed I will be buying the Samsung KS8000. My only question is when watching football, basketball, or streaming Netflix, how does the refresh rate and motion handle it? Is it fuzzy at all or is the picture quality able to keep up with fast pace movement in sports and tv shows?

    Thanks,

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 26, 2016 at 11:25 am

      Hello there Isiah, the KS8000 is in fact an excellent TV for motion handling across the board. It also delivers an excellent native refresh rate performance with its standard rate of 120Hz. Motion blur is quite low and though we’ve seen better in some Sony top-shelf TVs, the KS8000 delivers very good motion blur performance. I doub’t you’ll be disappointed with how it handles sports and action in TV shows or movies.

      Reply

  • RallyImprezive
    May 30, 2016 at 4:58 am

    It’s mentioned in the article that the TV comes with some “enhancement” technologies turned on that really hinder performance more than anything. I’ve just bought the TV, and I’m really happy with it, but id like to know what settings you’d recommend disabling? Maybe a “tuning guide” section in the reviews would be helpful? 🙂

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 3, 2016 at 1:17 am

      Hello there Rally, for starters, I’d recommend setting your KS8000 to “Movie” mode in the Picture settings menu. This might depend slighlty on the content you’d like to watch but this mode seems to be the closest to ideal for most Movies and TV shows. Then, I’d also suggest setting your backlight setting in the “Expert Settings” section so that it fits how bright the room you’re viewing the TV in is most of the time. A mid range value like 4 or 5 is good, and setting it too low in brighter rooms can cause contrast problems. You should also disable the “sharpness” setting below that by setting it to zero since raising it even a bit can cause odd-looking oversharpening. Aside from these, I’d also suggest turning off “Auto Motion Plus” in the same Expert Settings menu since keeping it on for most movie and TV content creates a weird looking effect as motion blur compensation sets in a bit too much through motion interpolation technology. Finally, local dimming can be useful but it’s not that great in the KS8000 to begin with so we’d generally recommend turning it off for truly deep blacks when you want them. Otherwise, the black level values will be quite high on the screen even when some piece of content is supposed to show “deep black”.

      Reply

  • Sam
    May 31, 2016 at 3:22 pm

    Hi Mike,

    How does the KS8000 compare to the Sony XBR-55X850D? I’m stuck in between these two models.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 2, 2016 at 9:26 pm

      Hello Sam, between the two, the KS8000 is the better TV overall. Samsung’s SUHD models for 2016 offer much better HDR specs with far higher peak brightness, better contrast and richer black levels. In terms of color, the two models are about evenly matched and both offer Wide Color Gamut and special color enhancement technologies (Quantum Dot Color in the Samsung and Triluminos Display in the X850D) but the HDR of the Samsung is the only one among the two models that’s UHD Alliance “Ultra HD Premium” certified. As for motion control specs and upscaling, both TVs are pretty closely matched, though the X850D offers considerably better motion blur control.

      Reply

  • Davin
    June 5, 2016 at 9:54 am

    I have recently purchased the LG uh8500 65 inch 4k tv, this decision was soley based off of my last LG TV….it was absolutely amazing in picture quality…. And the live cable feed through a HD was incredible…. After setting up the 8500 the exact way as the last LG we have been a little let down on picture quality…. The cable picture via our HD antenna is horrible at best. The store soldnus the Samsung 4k player, got it home and found out that LG is needing to send out a firmware update before it will work…..could be months.. So we returned it and got a nice blu ray player to hold us over….The 4k upscaling is nice on our older blu ray movies, but the picture quality drops drastically in a dark room. We have no way of getting any 4k content so I don’t know if my decision to return is pre mature, our internet is down in our area for a few more weeks….But the images that have came along with this set are absolutely STUNNING, And if this is the picture quality I will receive once actually playing 4k content… The manager at our best buy has worked out a deal with us, he’s offered to swap this LG out with the ks8600 65 inch curved TV straight up for inconvenience…. Just a little worried about future proofing..ie HDR and Dolby vision……I was told in the store that it would be an actual hardware thing, and not firmware…….absolutely torn on what to do……..I’ve never owned a Samsung and I’m not sure if I’d have to use the little box that comes with it, I run everything through my 4k received, and I’m also concerned on hiding wires with the Samsung, the LG came with a very nice set up for hiding all my cables!! Help!!

    Reply

  • Eric
    June 5, 2016 at 2:42 pm

    HI! having trouble deciding between sony x850d and ks8000. I have seen on other sources that x850d is better for watching sports? which is what I mostly want this TV for. When I see the samsung though, the picture is just so eye popping. Thank you for any feedback!!

    Reply

  • Andy
    June 5, 2016 at 7:20 pm

    I just bought a KS8000 and notice an audio delay “lip sync” when viewing cable TV shows, with the sound coming from the TV. I have a high speed HDMI cable from the cable box to the TV. Do you have any suggestions? I found the audio setting and changed the audio delay to zero. Thanks!

    Reply

  • CS
    June 6, 2016 at 6:19 am

    Hi Stephen,

    Thanks for this complete and thorough review, it helps a lot.

    I’m base in the EU (Italy) therefore my choices are restricted to EU market which is not interesting enough for Vizio apparently.. So my choices are, as far as brands are concerned, SONY, Samsung or LG (I’d avoid Philips, Panasonic, Sharp who seem a step behind as far as 4K is concerned).

    I’ve got dimension limits within a 48-49-50” and I’m deeply considering the KS8000 (which in Europe seems to be labeled UE49KS8000TXZT but it should be the same) but have a major concern: given the lack (at least in italy) of FHD content (not to say 4K) and given that major national channels are on terrestrial with a SD will I be able to have a decent result? Will the processor suffer in the long term from such a high demand in terms of upscaling requests?

    Given the brands above (and ignoring for a second that we’re on this specific product’s review page) is there any other comparable device I should take a look at?

    Thanks a lot

    Reply

  • Ed B
    June 6, 2016 at 7:51 am

    What are the important differences between the KS8000 and the KS9000? I see only two: the KS9000 has a “super” before MR240 and before UHD.

    Under what circumstances would these differences worth an extra $500 for the KS9000?

    Reply

    • Lucas
      June 9, 2016 at 11:07 am

      I’m struggling to really see the difference between KS8000 and KS9000. Where I’m from the price difference is about $250. Worth it, Stephen?

      Reply

      • Stephen
        Stephen
        June 21, 2016 at 11:28 am

        Hey there Lucas. Overall, we’d say that you simply go for the KS8000. The KS9500 delivers slightly better color performance by way of a marginally higher DCI-P3 color space coverage and its peak brightness is a bit better than that of the KS8000 but theses differences are hard to detect with the naked eye. In all other respects, the phones are so close in quality that you might as well save the $250 you’d pay for the KS9500. I’d say different if you were comparing the full-array LED backlit KS9800 Samsung flagship TV but this isn’t the case here.

        Reply

  • David
    June 7, 2016 at 3:22 pm

    Did you guys notice any issues in game mode at 4K 60hz? On my set, there is a weird twitch that the screen will do every 3-4 seconds. It doesn’t happen in PC mode – only in game mode. Very strange. Samsung support claims that the TV doesn’t support game mode when plugged into a PC, but that sounds like a load of nonsense.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 8, 2016 at 5:45 pm

      Hello there David, first, no we haven’t noticed or heard of the issue you describe happening when the KS8000 is used in PC gaming. It may be a unit-specific problem. Furthermore, yes, the KS8000 can be used in game mode while connected to a PC. This is the setting at which it delivers its lowest input lag from what we recall. Have you considered activating or deactivating motion interpolation (“Auto Motion Plus”, as it’s called in this TV model) in the TV to see if this might get rid of your problem?

      Reply

  • CS
    June 9, 2016 at 1:09 am

    Hi Stephen,

    would you mind answering my questions about upscaling poor definition over a long time.. does it affect overall system performances in the long term?

    Also, would you be able to tell if UEXXKS8000 matches the american version UNXXKS9000 as I could guess from reading boths specs?

    Regards.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 21, 2016 at 11:33 am

      Hello CS, from everything we’ve seen to-date, upscaling performance in any quality 4K TV (especially all models from major brands that we’ve covered) won’t deteriorate over time. If a particular LG, Sony or Samsung TV model upscales well out of the box, it will likely continue to do so a few years later, unless something goes badly wrong with its processing hardware.

      Also, though I can’t be sure about all overseas model number SKU variations, the UEXXKS8000 you mention is almost certainly the same as the American market UNKS8000 4K TV. The KS9000 is the next model up in price.

      Reply

  • Sameer Thakur
    June 12, 2016 at 5:48 pm

    Hi, My question is regarding difference between 8500 and 8000. I have read pretty thoroughly through the specs and multiple reviews for both and they seem fairly identical other than curve vs flat and auto depth vs contrast enhancer. But I am unable to make sense of user reviews where users have (Amazin among others) rated 8500 much higher than 8000. Also the most common user complaint which is juddering is also mostly reported for 8000 (again based on reading user reviews in different forums). Wanted to ask you that keeping the technical similarities aside did you see a better performance on8500?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 12, 2016 at 6:58 pm

      Hello there Sameer. Very simply, there is no real difference between the two TVs except that the KS8500 comes with a curved display. In all other specs they’re essentially identical. This includes the nature of their HDR, their color rendering capacity, contrast, peak brightness and all those particular Samsung features like HDR1000 and Auto Depth Enhancer. Juddering issues are the same in both and judder control is actually quite good I’d say. This at least has been our experience but it is possible that specific units vary in how well they deliver display due to manufacturing quirks and Samsung may (this is pure speculation here) have put more focus on building the KS8500 with higher quality even if both TVs are identical in their specs.

      Reply

  • Tom Tracey
    June 13, 2016 at 7:38 pm

    Hi. In your review of the ku7000 I asked a question about a comparison between my ku6300 and the ku7000 which I was thinking of exchanging for. I am happy to tell you I did the exchange. I exchanged the ku6300 for the KS8000 that cost 100.00 more than the ku7000. I am very happy with my purchase except for one thing. Here is my question. Is it true that premium tvs that get very bright have shorter lives than say maybe the ku6300? I had a 5 year maintenance agreement on the ku6300 but my KS8000 has no extended sears warranty only the one year samsung factory warranty. Do you think I should pay sears for their extended warranty or purchase a warranty from some other party or don’t worry about it and just use the one year warranty that comes with the ks8000?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 20, 2016 at 9:51 pm

      Hello there Tom, first of all, the KS8000 likely won’t suffer from a shorter display life due to its brighter LEDs. Samsung, from what we know of this TV, has taken these issues into account and deterioration in brightness will probalby be hard to notice even after a couple years or more. In any case, this particular model offer such high peak brightness that even a moderate decrease in the power of its LEDs will still likely leave you with superior brightness performance to that of the KU6300 or even KU7000.

      That said, if you don’t mind spending the extra, go for the extended warranty. Any 4K TV can fail for any number of reasons at some point in that time-frame. This is always at least possible, and there’s no harm in being prepared as long as the warranty in question isn’t prohibitively expensive.

      Reply

  • Heath
    June 14, 2016 at 8:35 am

    Hi, I just set up my KS8000 65″ and tried watching sports (NBA and MLB) and the picture wasn’t great. It was a little pixelated and didn’t look as good as my Vizio from 6 years ago. I have Time Warner Cable. What should I do?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 20, 2016 at 9:45 pm

      Hello Heath, your problem there is almost certainly due to signal corruption of some kind from the content source. I doubt that the TV itself or its connectivity ports through which you’re receiving your Time Warner content are the problem, though it’s possible. I’d suggest trying a piece of native 4K content from a hard media source or a streaming video source if you have th right level of internet connectivity (20Mbps at least) to see how the TV performs with these pieces of content, just to make sure it’s not the TV’s own picture quality which is the problem. ANother alternative is to try playing an HD Blu-ray movie through a conventional Blu-ray disc player, or even a high quality DVD from a DVD player to see how well the upscaled content from either displays on your KS8000 screen. Since this TV offers Samsung’s excellent upscaling engine, both content sources should display crisply if the discs themselves have been well formatted.

      Reply

  • Bonjo Barbosa
    June 15, 2016 at 3:49 am

    Hi,
    Do we have any recommendation video settings for KS8000 ? I have the 49″ model and I’, very excited with it.
    Also, I don’t know yet if the TV can support moving SAT disches.

    Moreover, Samsung has declared its support for the Smart Hub for 2016. However, there isn’t any app in TV for the connection smart devices.

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 17, 2016 at 2:33 pm

      Hello Bonjo. I don’t know what you’ll be using your KS8000 for most of all but i’ll assume its movies and TV shows or streaming TV/movie content. In that case, I’d recommend you set the TV to “Movie” mode in the Picture settings menu, and then set your backlight settings (Under the Expert Settings menu) to either 4 or 5 if you’re going to be watching in a very dim room or higher, closer to 7 if you’re going to watch your TV in a normally lit room. Also, I’d suggest turning sharpness to zero and contrast to 100%. Anything above zero for sharpness can create a strange over-processed visual effect, especially for native 4K content.

      Finally, I’d also suggest setting your color tone to warm 1 or warm 2 for the best cinematic effect, this can also be done under “Expert Settings”.

      Reply

  • Rainier
    June 17, 2016 at 9:48 pm

    Initially I went to Best Buy and went with the Sony 850d. It seemed to me that the Magnolia sales people were pushing the Sony so much that I feel under the pressure. After 2 days with it and reading more reviews, I decided to take a trip to another Best Buy to see the differences. Again, I was bombarded to go with Sony when in actually the Samsung is the CLEAR CHOICE. I went back to the original Best Buy to return the Sony and got myself a 65 inch KS8000. The Samsung’s upscaling and quality of the picture truly made my purchase worth it. In terms of viewing angles, it’s not an issue at all.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      June 20, 2016 at 9:23 pm

      Hello Rainier, yes, we found the KS8000 to have a far superior overall picture quality than the X850D, especially when it comes to peak brightness, black level and contrast. The two models are more comparable on the quality of their wide color gamut but even in this regard, the Samsung emerges as the winner, since it also includes quantum dot color. Some stores like to push a certain brand for their own reasons and all fairness about actual quality be damned.

      Reply

  • Anders
    July 2, 2016 at 3:59 pm

    if possible, can anyone tell me the differences between the KS8000 and the KS7000(europe only)?
    from flatpanelshd; KS7000 lacks the design, more powerful speakers and twin-tuner of KS8000, If these are the only differences then it is the KS7000 for me 😀

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 4, 2016 at 1:40 pm

      Hi there Anders. In practical terms, the difference between the two really is quite minor, assuming we’re tallking about the TVs that are called the KS9000 and the KS8000 in the U.S. Both are SUHD TVs with nearly identical with only slightly better peak brightness and color performance in the KS8000 (KS9000 in the U.S) and of course some minor differences in speaker power. Yes, if you want to sav a bit of money, simply go for the 7000 model.

      Reply

  • Robert DelGardo
    July 4, 2016 at 8:47 pm

    I’m deciding between this and the Vizio P65-C1.
    Unsure which to buy, any thoughts?
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 17, 2016 at 3:53 pm

      Hello there Robert, I’d suggest going or the Samsung simple because it’s just as good as or slightly better than the Vizio in all display performance specs but also offers the added bonus of a much higher peak display brightness (about 1400 nits instead of the Vizio’s 550 nits) and also comes with a superior smart TV platform, though this last detail may not be important to you if you’re going to use an external smart platform fom a set-top box or something.

      The two edges the Vizio has over the Samsung are in its lower price and the fact that it also offers Dolby Vision HDR support, the Samsung only comes with HDR10, which is admittedly more popular anyhow.

      Reply

  • Riley
    July 8, 2016 at 5:37 pm

    Hi there Steven. Im tossing up between the ks8000 and ku7000 I am from Newzealand and there is roughly a $1000 difference between these models. I have decided with Samsung but don’t really know if the ks8000 justifies $1000 more how much better is the is the ks8000 model I will be only gaming and watching movies on the tv.

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 8, 2016 at 8:44 pm

      Hello there Riley, Assuming you can spend the extra $1000 without seriously denting your budget, then go for the KS8000. It is absolutely a better performer across the board. The KS8000 offers wide color gamut (the KU7000 does not), it delivers almost 20% better DCI-P3 digital cinema color space performance (this margin makes a very noticeable difference), it offers about 4 times the peak brightness of the KU7000 and its contrast level if a full third better than that of the KU7000. Both TVs offer the same smart TV platform (2016 Tizen version) and both both offer the same quality of non-4K content upscaling but in terms of display specs, the KS8000 is definitely the much better 4K TV, with some of the best HDR specs we’ve seen for 2016. Additionally, the motion control and udder control specs of the KS8000 are all superior to those of the KU7000. Finally, the KS8000 comes with one more HDMI 2.0a port than the KU7000.

      Reply

      • Riley
        July 9, 2016 at 5:05 pm

        Stephen sorry realised i spelt your name wrong. Thanks alot of help guess that justifies the price difference. Will be going for the ks8000 model

        Reply

  • George
    July 9, 2016 at 1:28 am

    55EF950V or ks7000 or ks8000 60 inch.

    I don’t want to spend over £1500 and and able to get refurbished
    55EF950 with one year warranty or the ks7000 with 5 years.

    Viewing distance 14 ft
    Very bright room during the day. Sun lantern has no blind at present.

    Mainly night time viewing mostly movies and boxsets. Stramend from Internet.

    Not bothered about smart features as I use chromecast.

    Very casually gamer, maybe once a month for a few hours.

    I don’t have any 3d blu rays. In fact I don’t really buy many blu rays mainly streaming.

    Can’t afford a 65 inch with hdr.

    What is the hdr like on 55EF950V vs ks7000.

    I was contemplating no 4k and hdr and buying refurbished full HD oled for 850. And waiting about 4 years for next one. However don’t like the curve.

    Been researching for months and it’s driving me crazy

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 16, 2016 at 6:18 pm

      Hi there George. I’m assuming that the KS7000 you refer to is the same model as what is called the KS8000 in the U.S, so going on that assumption, here’s my advice:

      Both TVs offer exellent HDR specs. The LG 55EF950V is a late 2015 OLED 4K TV but it’s one of the first from LG to include HDR display and as such it does a stunning job of offering high peak brightness (for an OLED model but also even by the standards of most LCD TVs) superb color performance and of course, that perfect OLED black level and local dimming down to the individual pixel level. In essence, in all major display performance specs, the 55EF950V is the somewhat superior 4K TV to the Samsung KS7000.

      However, as far as LCD 4K HDR TVs go, the KS7000 model you refer to will give you those possibly crucial extra 5 inches of display and more importantly, it offers up some of the best peak brightness on the market today. It’s top brightness capacity is about 1400 nits (cd/m2) and this is indeed impressive by HDR standards as they stand now. This capacity for high brightness might also be useful if you watch the TV during the day time in your brightly lit room. On the other hand, the KS7000’s local dimming technology (also important for HDR display performance and bright room viewing) is only mediocre since this model is edge lit. Finally, the KS7000 doesn’t include 3D of any kind. Oddly, none of Samsung’s 2016 4K TVs do in fact.

      So in summary, if you want the best across the board performance specs except for high peak brightness, go for the LG EF950V. It also happens to be an excellent TV for gaming and offers very good passive 3D technology. It’s HDR is very decent. On the other hand, if the key HDR spec of high 1000 nit+ peak brightness is important to you, go for the KS7000. This is the only area in which it thoroughly beats the 55EF950V, along with its 60 inch display of course.

      Reply

  • Brendan Falkowski
    July 12, 2016 at 4:54 pm

    FYI — This model does not support component or composite cables. The specs in this article are wrong.

    I found out the hard way after buying it. Won’t be able to play old consoles like Sega Dreamcast or Nintendo 64 without some type of composite to HDMI signal converter, sigh…

    The photo of the Samsung OneConnect box an incorrect older model, which also required an additional adaptor to use component or composite cables.

    This TV comes with the OneConnect Mini which only has HDMI, USB, and optical audio ports.

    It’s still a good TV, but I probably would have bought an LG or Vizio that still have the old ports.

    Reply

  • Will
    July 15, 2016 at 5:12 pm

    I’m in a pickle, I am wanting a new TV for my room, the setting will be predominantly dark when I will watch the TV. I have narrowed down my choices to the Samsung ks8000 (This one) and the Vizio 55″ P-Series (2016 edition), if there are others with about the same features for the same price please let me know. The only thing that changes my mind about getting the Samsung is it’s slightly higher price and the local dimming which when compared to the Vizio isn’t so great. Any opinion on my ordeal will be appreciated.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 16, 2016 at 2:08 pm

      Hi there Will. There is actually one problem with your Vizio choice which will offset the benefit of its affordability. I assume that you’ve chosen between these two TVs because of their superb color and contrast/black performance, as well as their high peak brightness. Well, for the KS8000, these qualities definitely apply and for the Vizio P-Series TVs as well (though peak brightness is a fair bit weaker in the Vizio TVs) However, the 55 inch Vizio P-series model in particular comes with an IPS display and this means far worse contrast, black performance and to some extent inferior color vibrancy as a result. In basic terms, its IPS panel weakens the TV as an HDR model. Thus, if you’re looking at the Vizio, you can either decide you don’t mind the defects of IPS in the 55 inch model (which admittedly won’t be quite as notable in a darker room), or you can downsize a bit to the 50 inch model and lose out on some display immersion, or you can go for the 65 inch P-Series and lose the price benefit this brand gives you over the Samsung KS8000.

      Thus, unless you don’t mind the IPS panel in the 55 inch P-Series for your needs, I’d suggest going for the 55 inch KS8000. In any case, it offers slightly better wide color gamut quality and a far superior level of peak brightness (1400+ nits vs. the P-Series maximum of just under 700 nits.

      Reply

  • Cott
    July 16, 2016 at 3:42 pm

    I am in the market for a 75 inch tv and am very disappointed there is no ks8000 in that size. Are there any samsungs at this size and price range you would recommend over the Sony 850d and vizio p75?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      July 16, 2016 at 8:58 pm

      Hey there Cott, Amomg the Samsung 2016 TVs, the only models in that size range (78 inches specifically) are the flagship KS9800, which we reviewed here, the KS9500 and the KS9000. The KS9800 is absolutely stunning and comes with full array LED backlighting but retails for a rather steep $9,997.99. The KS9500 sells for $7,999.99 for the 78 inch model and the KS9000 comes in a model that’s exactly 75 inches but also sells for a fairly steep $6,499.99. Any of these three are definitely recommendable but if I’d choose one among them, it would be the KS9000. despite being the cheapest of them, it’s only moderately inferior to the KS9800 (especially in terms of local dimming and peak brightness to a smaller extent).

      Next down however is the P-Series P75 you yourself mention. This is a much more affordable TV than the Samsung models I mention above, at $3,799 but despite its lower price, it offers nearly identical display quality, superior local dimming very high wide color gamut color coverage and also the added benefit of superb local dimming (as good as or possibly even better than the KS9800 Samsung flagship. The one drawback of the P75 is its lower peak brightness (less than 700 nits instead of the 1450 nits of the Samsung KS9-Series TVs but this is not a major loss for the most part.

      Reply

  • Tim
    July 20, 2016 at 11:34 am

    Been trying to decide between the 55KS8000 or an LG9100 … I can get eh LG for a little less money. Only 1080p but …. at 55″ and 6-7 feet away will I even notice?

    Reply

  • ASHISH
    July 22, 2016 at 8:40 pm

    can i put the 49″ KS8000(KS7000 in India) in my room (measuring 10 feet x 10 feet…viewing distance is approx.8 feet and its well lit )because i really like this TV but there is no smaller size.Will this big screen size in a small room result in any health issues like eye-ache or headache.

    Reply

  • Frank
    July 29, 2016 at 10:03 am

    Hey Stephen,

    Thanks much for the review. Unless I missed it somewhere, did you encounter any issues with DSE/banding/visible vertical shadowing on slow pans during sporting events (green grass in particular)? I purchased an LG 65UH7700 – thrilled with it, the picture is outstanding, but the banding issue is now something I can’t unsee. I’m coming up on my exchange/return window and contemplating this Samsung as a 60″. I know LEDs aren’t perfect, and that vertical bands are part of the deal, but I’ve cycled through 2 65″ LGs already with visible banding – just wondering if this Samsung out of the box makes it significantly less noticeable. Also – is the extra $500 worth the jump from 60″ to 65″? I’ve read elsewhere that banding is better tamed in production of smaller screens… ie, is part of my problem that these are 65″ televisions.

    Thanks Much!

    Reply

  • Bob Grande
    July 31, 2016 at 8:20 pm

    Hi Stephen,
    We currently have a 50″ Sony LCD projection TV. After my due diligence, I purchased the UN60KS800D at Costco. I will be installing the unit in a corner so extreme viewing angles aren’t a concern (probably 45 degrees at the outside) but I understand these edge lit units have a fairly narrow horizontal one (around 20 degrees). It’s hard to find customer reviews of the 60 inch version. After reading the “Samsung Panel Lottery” articles, I’m now concerned that the version EA01 panel in this unit may not be the best among the panels Samsung uses. Do you know who makes EA01? Should I be concerned? Although Rtings.com testing appeared to indicate that even the Samsung panels may not be optimal in one way or another such as contrast ratio, apparently the differences are measurable but are they significant enough to be noticeable? Other submittals have stated that the 60″ has a “larger bezel” and Samsung doesn’t make any 60 inch panels. It would be a stretch spacewise to put the 65 inch UN65KS800D or KD8000 (but only about $300 more than I paid for the 60″ right now). Would the 65 inch be a safer choice? Thanks for your consideration.

    Reply

  • Garry
    August 1, 2016 at 1:25 pm

    Looking at the UN65KS800D from Costco and it stipulates here I need at least a 15-25 Mbps connection. Will this work on 7 Mbps? It is the best I can do. Also, does this have a tuner in it for over the air transmission? Live a rural area. Thanks

    Reply

  • Chuck
    August 2, 2016 at 3:05 pm

    Hi I was just wondering if I should go for the 65″ ks9000 over the ks800, I watch basic cable tv and a lot of hockey and football. Is there a big difference in motion blurr or picture. There are a lot of negative motion blurr reviews on Amazon. Thank you

    Reply

  • Tamil
    August 2, 2016 at 10:12 pm

    Thanks for the detailed review.
    I had a question — Somewhere I read that only HDMI Port1 on KS8000 supports HDR.
    Can you confirm if HDR is supportd on all 4 HDMI ports or on Port1 only ?
    Thanks.

    Reply

  • Nate
    August 3, 2016 at 4:44 pm

    Currently have a UN55JU7100 and am thinking about replacing it with the KS8000. Is it worth it as an upgrade since I dont watch 3D anymore? Thanks

    Reply

  • Mike
    August 3, 2016 at 9:50 pm

    Hi. So it seems like the KS8000 is the best 65″ tv for 2000 bucks? The 65″ LG B6 is stunning but costs $4000…can it be worth double the price? The guy at Best Buy said yes…what do you think? I’m tempted to go for the LG….but is it worth double the price?

    Reply

  • A M
    August 8, 2016 at 6:02 pm

    Where can I find some good calibration settings for watching this set in a completely pitch black room?

    Reply

  • Jessy Haugh
    August 9, 2016 at 6:06 pm

    Hello looking to buy a TV in the next week or so. I’m looking at this or the vizio p series 65in. Seeing as both are the same price what would you recommend. I watch an insane amount of movies. Most of the tv I watch is through Hulu Netflix etc via xbox. Which would you recommend. Wouldn’t the vizio be better for movies due to the dimming?

    Reply

  • Dale
    August 11, 2016 at 4:11 pm

    Hello, I mostly watch Blu-Ray movies. (I don’t own cable of any kind). How does this TV do with Blu-Rays movies?

    Reply

  • Bruce
    August 16, 2016 at 3:14 am

    Hi there,

    I am reluctantly looking to replace my aging Panasonic TH-37PX70B. The reason I haven’t moved before is because it’s such a good screen (sounds decent too). Film looks like films (the plasma thing, you know what I mean), less pixelated than LCD/LED. And every time I take myself down to a show room to look at upgrading I’m struck by just how inferior LED screens are. They appear to go ‘blotchy’ where there are large areas of colour (may be struggling with colour variation). I am very interested in the Samsungs, esp with their quantum dot tech. I know that I’ll get more detail (at both 1080 and 4k obviously) and the software is in a different league. However, in your opinion, will I be left wanting if I upgrade to something like the KS8000? I just want my programmes to feel like they are watched on a TV and not a computer screen. It’s hard to describe, but I’m hoping you understand what I mean.

    Thanks in advance

    Bruce

    ps once a sales guy from a showroom said that if I wanted plasma feeling back, I could dial down the sharpness on the LED TV. Is this true or just sales speak?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      August 16, 2016 at 10:48 pm

      hey there Bruce. I’ll keep this answer as simple as possible for your larger question and hope it’s as helpful as can be.

      Yes, LCD/LED TVs can often suffer blotchiness and particularly when it comes to displaying large areas of uniform black, grey or other colors but this is a problem which has been heavily decreased in some of the better 4K TVs of the last couple years in particular, since they’re generally considered premium models. Samsung’s SUHD TVs for 2016, of which you mention the KS8000 are particularly good in this regard. There may be unit specific differences at work that make one TV perform less solidily than another but all of the SUHD models for 2016 that we have reviewed to date offer superb black uniformity and quality of color. They also offer excellent blacks for LCD TVs, though nothing quite beats OLED if you’re looking for something that will match or even exceed plasma in black level quality.

      That said, I’d recommend you either go for a high black level 4K LCD TV like any of the 2016 SUHD models, or Vizio’s also excellent P-Series 4K TVs for 2016. I’d recommend Sony’s 2015 4K HDR TVs as well for excellent blacks and uniformity. The 2016 XBR-D Sony models perform a bit more weakly on this for some reason so I recommend the Samsung and Vizio TVs more. Or you could possibly simply buy an OLED 4K TV. they will give you the best unifromity we’ve seen so far, and especially if you go for one of the 2016 models such as the C6, B6 or a late 2015 model like the EF9500 or EG9600 if you can find them. These latter models have also gone down in price recently.

      Check out our reviws of all these models along the right side of the site home page, they’re located under the “4k TV Reviews” heading.

      As for what the sales rep told you about dialing down sharpness, I have no reference for that and it seems a bit silly as a suggestion. One thing that will improve black level in an LCD 4K TV however is deactivating its local dimming and perhaps reducing its maximum brightness level in the custom settings.

      Reply

  • James
    August 26, 2016 at 7:17 pm

    Hello Stephen,

    I have recently purchase the Samsung KS8000, as of today, I ran into a problem as it appears I have experienced backlight bleed. Here is a walk-through of issue:

    1- Opened TV
    2- Went straight to Netflix
    3- Selected movie‎
    4- I fast forward movie right away, 1/3 of screen is movie moving frame by frame. 2/3‎ is black background. ‎
    5- As I am fast forwarding I ‎observe 2 pinkish purple and white spot light‎ n one in the middle of the screen and the other on the top right corner. 
    6- – I hit pause button and lightly scrubbed two spots with Samsung’s microfiber and hit the play button at which point the movie is now full screen with no black background and observe no more backlight bleed.  
    8- I than did a picture TEST within the Samsung settings‎, no issues. 
    7- I then tried to reproduce issue ‎(redoing step 1-4) and was not able to observe any backlight bleed. 

    Is this normal ? I understand issue seems gone, however is there any chance it will‎ come back? What are your recommendations?  I believe I am still within my exchange period.  

    Reply

  • Geralt
    August 28, 2016 at 1:57 am

    First of all, thank you for following up and answering questions.

    I am a PC user/gamer only, looking for 55″-65″ options to serve as a monitor permanently, making the 4K jump into the living room.
    Obviously, 4:4:4 compliance is relevant, as well as low input lag.
    Is this the right TV for me?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 2, 2016 at 7:17 am

      Hey there Geralt, thank you and on both counts, the KS8000 is a great choice. It supports [email protected] and 30Hz in 4:4:4 and it’s input lag of 21 milliseconds is very good by TV standards. One thing the TV doesn’t support however, if you’re looking to do high frame-rate HD gaming, is 1080p at 120Hz.

      Reply

  • Jon
    August 29, 2016 at 4:13 pm

    Hey!

    I had a quick question regarding this panel. I’ve seen a few in person, I originally wrote it off as a display error but saw it on the other two I checked out, but it appears that the 8000 has light bleed from the top edge light. It’s noticeably brighter and can be distracting. For some odd reason though, I did not see this on it’s 8500 cousin, nor did I see it on the 7 series as well (all 2016 versions), perhaps the brightness was reduced? I was interesting in this set, but that top light isn’t something I can get over and wondered if you encountered the same and/or had any suggestions on the matter. For the record I’m also looking at the Vizio-P and seriously considering upping the ante and just going with the OLED, likely the B6P, but image retention and ABL have me somewhat hesitant, for the cost.

    Thanks again!

    Jon

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      August 31, 2016 at 10:17 pm

      Hey there Jon, we never noticed this phenomenon in the KS8000 models we’ve seen but it is something we’ve heard of from a few other sources, oddly, so it’s a bit tricky to say exactly what might be the more common occurrence. That said, if you’re in doubt, I’d suggest simply going for the KS8500 or yes, I’d also recommend Vizio’s excellent P-Series models, especially the 65 inch version and above or the 50 inch model. They don’t quite match the 1400 nit peak brightness of the 2016 SUHD TVs but they’re still great overall HDR and 4K display performers. The 55 inch P-series has an IPS display and we don’t like its low contrast levels and poor black performance, even if the IPS does deliver far superior viewing angles.

      On the other hand, if you don’t mind the extra expense of going for the OLED B6 TV, I’d absolutely recommend it above all of these TVs. It is a truly stunning performer and nearly as good as the G6 and E6 “premium” OLED TVs for 2016. It only lacks their unique picture-on-glass design, their audio system power and the 3D technology they offer But in core display specs, it’s basically just as good. Image retention is no longer a problem in the LG OLED 4K TVs of 2015 and 2016 and even the older 2014 models didn’t have this problem to a serious degree, despite fears to the contrary. As for ABL, the 2016 OLEDs do impose it on full display brightness readings and cap it at a still decent 130 nits but in smaller 10% window areas, these TVs the (B6 included) can still manage well above 550 nits of brightness, which is comparable to the specs for many premium LCD 4K TVs, so you’re not likely to note a serious problem with the ABL in most movie content.

      Reply

  • Vic M
    September 3, 2016 at 9:49 pm

    Greetings All,

    Hope this isn’t a dumb question. Anyhow, I connect the UN60KS8000 mini connect one box to my AVR “ARC” HDMI input. Should I connect my Blu-ray player to the one connect box or the AVR Blu-ray input. what would work best ? Your knowledgeable reply most appreciated.

    Vic M,
    Sunnyvale, Ca

    Reply

  • Federico Bacchetta
    September 8, 2016 at 2:52 pm

    Hola! Que tal ?
    Este modelo es igual al KS7500? En caso de no serlo, pueden decirme que diferencias encuentro o si van a hacer un review del modelo mencionado.

    Muchas gracias!!

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 18, 2016 at 5:58 pm

      Hola Federico, nos enfocamos principalmente en modelos que salen en el mercado Estado Unidense y entonces no hemos hecho un review del KS7500 por si tiene alguna pequeña diferencia en su calidad y especificaciones. Pero, por lo que tengo entendido, es completamente igual al KS8000. Es decir que si lees nuestro review de este modelo, aqui, encontraras todo lo que tienes que saber de su calidad (que es exelente por cierto).

      Reply

  • Rohit
    September 10, 2016 at 9:34 am

    Hello, I am confused about 55″ KS 8000 and Sony X850D.
    can you please guide which is better and why?

    Also any other options that I should consider?

    Reply

  • Scott
    September 20, 2016 at 10:07 am

    I am torn between the 7000 and 8000 series, 65′ tv. What is your recommendation?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 21, 2016 at 9:25 am

      Hi there Scott, definitely recommend that you go for the 8000 series, if the models you’re comparing are the KS8000 and the KU7000. The KS8000 offers far superior color performance, full HDR10 high dynamic range and some of the best peak brightness we’ve ever seen in a 4K TV. Furthermore, it’s a much better performer on motion control specs of all types.

      Reply

  • christian
    September 22, 2016 at 12:44 pm

    I don’t understand why in the previous page you say it succeeds 2015’s 7 series model, despite in the main article saying it rivals the Ks9000 and is superior to all of last years models?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 23, 2016 at 7:43 am

      Hello Christian, the KS8000 is the rough successor to the 2015 JS 7 Series SUHD TV but superior in its display specs and yes, it is very similar to the KS9000 in the quality of its performance. The 2016 SUHD TVs are all very close in their performance quality, except for the flagship KS9800 which is much better at local dimming and offers notably better peak brightness.

      Reply

  • Jayson
    September 23, 2016 at 1:11 pm

    I have a question, I bought this tv from best buy about 2 weeks ago and I noticed my unit has like a flashlight effect from the bottom of the tv and top while the tv is displaying a picture, it bothers me because it changes the colors and makes them look a bit more washed out while viewing, does anyone else have this problem?

    Reply

  • Michael Laquidara
    September 23, 2016 at 4:51 pm

    With the new firmware update there is and HDR+ setting…what do you think of this? Is it worth turning on?

    Reply

  • Brian
    September 26, 2016 at 10:35 am

    Hi, there is a special running on the curved 55inch KS9500, it is being sold for slightly less than the 60 inch flat KS8000. Would you go for the larger (and flat) KS8000 or the somewhat superior specs of the KS9500?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      September 26, 2016 at 7:17 pm

      Hey there Brian. I’d go for either model depending on what you’re comfortable with on those price differences and size specs. Generally, with 4K resolution, bigger is always better but with HDR (as both TVs have) bigger sin’t as relevant. We don’t think curved screens are more than a gimmick and their design causes minor problems with how the TV sticks out if you mount it to a wall, as well as viewing angle and light reflection problems but all of these are mild. Aside from them curvature really offers no benefit, so it’s nearly a neutral consideration. Thus, go for what you like. Both TVs are close enough in the quality of all their display specs to be great whichever you choose.

      Reply

  • Ian Mathews
    September 27, 2016 at 12:42 pm

    I am torn between the Vizio p65-C1 and the KS8000, what one would be better for viewing football?

    Thanks

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      October 3, 2016 at 8:59 am

      Hey there Ian, quite frankly, the two are so closely matched in most specs that i’d suggest picking based on price more than anything else. Two other things though: The KS8000 delivers a much higher level of peak brightness for highlights while the Vizio P65-C1 offers better overall contrast. The Vizio TV also delivers a much better local dimming quality than the Samsung TV. Both have nearly equal motion control quality and thus are both great for sportscasts.

      Reply

      • Ian Mathews
        October 5, 2016 at 1:53 pm

        Thanks Stephen I really appreciate your feedback. I am leaning towards the KS8000 due to the peak brightness. Which TV would you choose if you had to pick?

        Thanks again!

        Reply

  • Rene
    November 24, 2016 at 10:54 pm

    Your review mentions that the ks8000 tv does not have 240hz, but the samsung website says it does. Is there something I’m missing?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      November 27, 2016 at 5:08 pm

      Hello Rene, the native refresh rate of the KS8000 is 120Hz. If Samsung mentions the 240Hz, it’s referring to the faux rate of their motion interpolation technology. This is NOT a representation of this TVs actual refresh rate.

      Reply

  • Jason
    November 29, 2016 at 10:14 pm

    Hello Stephen, I just ordered the KS8000 in the 60″. An earlier question was posed specifically regarding panel differences in the 60″ display versus the 55″ and/or 65″. It’s currently on back order so I actually have some time to go up or down in size depending upon your response. Is the panel question something with which you would be concerned?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 5, 2016 at 12:39 am

      Hey there Jason. Yes, the extra 5 inches makes a difference in either direction, but this difference is much more notable when you compare a 65 inch model with a 55 inch model. When it comes to a 60 inch 4K TV, it takes a comfortable middle ground that most users viewing at a normal distance of 6 to 10 feed will consider “good enough”. You should be okay with the 60 inch version and if you simply sit a little bit closer, it should offer a perfectly decent viewing experience, though of course 65 inches is slightly better overall.

      Reply

  • Allan Marcus
    November 30, 2016 at 10:08 pm

    Hi. Great write up. Money aside, would you recommend the lg OLED over the Samsung? We are primarily TV watchers with a 54″ pano plasma, and are ready to upgrade to 65″

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 2, 2016 at 3:09 pm

      Hey there Allen. All pricing issues aside, yes I’d recommend a newer LG OLED TV over the KS8000 or any other Samsung SUHD TV. The OLEDs for 2016 simply offer superior display quality and even though their peak brightness is lower than that of the stunning Samsung SUHD TV’s peak of 1450 nits, the perfect, total black capacity of the OLED models compensates for this wonderfully. They also offer slighlty better motion handling. On the other hand, if you want to use your TV for console gaming in HDR, go for the Samsung. LG has yet to fix a serious input lag problem for HDR gaming in its OLD TVs.

      Reply

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