News
10 comments

LG Need Not Yet Worry About Samsung, Hisense, TCL’s “QLED Alliance” for 4K TVs

by on May 7, 2017
 

Stephan Jukic – May 7, 2017

Calling their new partnership the “QLED Alliance”, These three giants of 4K TV display manufacturing are working together to develop improved technology which will seriously challenge the cutting-edge stature of LG’s OLED TV display in the 4K or other TVs of the very near future.

Quite simply, Samsung and its two smaller partners want to develop QLED display in LCD 4K TVs as it stands today into something that genuinely gives the highly advanced OLED display panels that only LG now sells on the consumer market a serious run for their money. Up to this point though, they still have little to go with in their quest. The term “QLED” in its current practical definition has so far only been used as a trademarked sort of marketing gimmick by Samsung to describe what is in all practical terms just LCD display technology with a color-enhancing layer of refined quantum dots which also add some extra viewing angle benefits. Now, thanks to this partnership between the three companies, the term QLED itself will also be used by Hisense and TCL for their own 4K quantum dot TV displays with their own enhanced colors. Later down the road other manufacturers could also possibly join this partnership for expanded use of the term QLED and further refinement of the technology behind it as well.

This announcement by the three companies was made recently in Beijing, China during the first ever QLED International Forum, which is hosted by the Chinese Electronics Chamber of Commerce. At this event, Samsung, Hisense and TCL all showed off their current and upcoming QLED 4K TVs which all offer versions of the same essential technology of quantum dot color filters for considerable color volume and vibrancy enhancements. These new TVs also promise or offer (in the case of Samsung’s existing QLED 4K HDR TVs) enhanced levels of peak brightness, deeper, richer blacks and better local dimming. Samsung in particular insists that its new QLED TVs compete effectively with LG OLED display technology on picture performance. As we ourselves have covered previously, this is isn’t exactly the case.

Quite simply, this rather naked competitive move against LG’s OLED TVs and the coalition of companies which sell LG OLED panels in their own TV models (Sony and Panasonic mainly) has little to give it an edge. QLED technology sounds fancy but in its current version, it’s still just glossed up and slightly refined LCD/LED display as we’ve always known it.

All of Samsung’s current cutting-edge QLED 4K HDR TVs are beautiful pieces of ultra HD display technology to be sure but the way in which they work is little different from how it was in the company’s 2015 and 2016 4K HDR TVs. The same goes for the best 4K HDR TVs we’ve yet seen from Hisense and TCL. None of these displays can come close to matching OLED in most overall performance specs and particularly when it comes to pixel-precise local dimming and brightening. Samsung’s QLED TVs do create levels of peak brightness which exceed those of LG’s best OLED TVs but in all other specs for display performance, they fall behind OLED. Even the best feature of today’s version of QLED, its capacity for wide color gamut (WCG) DCI-P3 and Rec.2020 color space coverage, is at least matched by LG’s 2017 OLED 4K HDR TVs.

In other words, today’s QLED is not much of a match for the sheer performance of LG’s OLED, despite the new “QLED Alliance” that has been formed. Instead, what we’re waiting to see and what these companies are laying the groundwork for, is the eventual arrival of “true QLED” display technology of the kind which actually could compete with LG OLED.

This eventuality was in fact covered at the QLED International Forum in Beijing and during a presentation by the nanotech company Nanosys, which builds the quantum dot QLED filters for Samsung’s 4K TVs, a roadmap was presented for the introduction of true QLED display in near future 4K TVs. Unlike today’s QLED, –for now just LCD/LED with better colors—real QLED displays would consist of millions of individual pixel-sized quantum dots being directly lit by electrical current  to generate images and colors on a QLED TV screen. Since these types of QLED displays would be able to light up or blacken individual pixels just like OLED TVs can, they could match the perfect blacks of today’s OLED while also delivering their own extraordinary color quality.

So far, no such “true QLED” TVs exist to our knowledge and the QLED Alliance of Samsung, Hisense TCL and possibly others down the road can for now boast nothing more than LCD 4K TV display with better color. LG doesn’t need to sweat too much about the impressive quality and remarkable popularity of its OLED 4K TVs quite yet.

Story by 4k.com

10 comments
 
Leave a reply »

 
  • analyst1
    May 8, 2017 at 4:13 pm

    Oled does not have a contender to compete with. If plasma technology survived and innovations to it were made from year to year than only Oled would have had to compete in the display technology field. qled though superior technology than LED is simply an extention of Led and has relatively less impressed me. On a test bench the performance qled would presumably rank average and Oled comparatively will show superior features.
    I cannot confirm the inferior/superior differences of the two technologies until testing takes place.

    Reply

  • animaleyezz
    May 9, 2017 at 3:57 am

    This “article” sounds very Anti-Samsung and very dismissive of the efforts they are putting forth to actually create a exciting and new category in television. While the technology hasn’t arrived to the level that we or even Samsung wants it. The infrastructure is being laid out and that’s a start. But rather than giving them props for the developments and improvements in their efforts you guys sound very, very critical of a step in the right direction.

    Reply

    • animaleyezz
      May 11, 2017 at 1:06 am

      It doesn’t look like my comment will be approved since moderation is still awaiting since May 9, 2017 at 3:57am. Censorship at it’s finest.

      Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 15, 2017 at 11:24 am

      Hello Animaleyezz. We apply constructive criticism as objectively as we can and have for that matter praised Samsung numerous times on 4K.com. Furthermore, we’ve repeatedly reviewed numerous 4K TV models of theirs extremely favorably because we genuinely believed their performance merited such an assessment. In addition to this, a visit to our (now in the process of a further update) main TV page and its list of suggestions for the best premium and budget 4K TVs shows just how many Samsung models we love to recommend. Thus suggesting that we’re “anti-Samsung” because of a few honest criticisms isn’t supported at all by a look around the website. Yes, I claim that OLED is superior to QLED in this post but that’s because the comparison is between QLED the marketing term for mostly normal LCD/LED technology as it stands today and the high performance of today’s OLED. We absolutely applaud Samsung’s work on developing real QLED pixel display technology but since it doesn’t yet exist commercially, it’s neither here nor there and we have to base our analysis on what consumers can buy now, as the title of this article indicates.

      Reply

      • animaleyezz
        May 16, 2017 at 2:27 am

        The only real criticism I’ve seen thus far is because of the price. Yet the ratings are extremely high and yet articles like this are just plain dismissive of the tech. Yet there does seem to be an overall reluctance to rate the Flagship model the Q9F. Yet you guys continue to do what you do.

        Reply

  • animaleyezz
    May 9, 2017 at 10:26 am

    So does LG pay you guys to slam everything that challenges OLED? Because 8 hours to moderate a comment seems a bit excessive. I’m sure this comment will be moderated as well.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      May 9, 2017 at 10:55 am

      Hello there Animaleyezz. I can absolutely assure you that we are not paid in any way by LG to “push” their OLED 4K TVs onto our readers. They genuinely are superb pieces of technology and this has been recognized by us through numerous concrete means. We also regularly point out their specific weaknesses and where LCD TVs of any kind outperform OLEDs. Furthermore, if we were being paid off by LG in any way, it would stand to reason that we should push all of their 4K TVs the same. A look through our site will clearly show that we don’t. Mainly because in contrast to our opinion of OLED models, our views of LG’s LCD 4K HDR TV models are almost consistently critical in certain ways. Any place where we review or mention the company’s LCD TVs thus includes all of these criticisms.

      Reply

      • animaleyezz
        May 9, 2017 at 11:57 pm

        Yet I still have a comment awaiting moderation after over 12 hours just for making a comment about how this article sounds anti-Samsung.

        Reply

  • Nzugu
    May 10, 2017 at 9:12 am

    Some reviewers, especially on youtube, claim that there’s a conspiracy, a collusion between LG and the reviewers they outright pay or shower them with freebies. Obviously such a conspiracy, while possible in the sense that anything is possible, is highly unlikely, of huge potential damage to LG’s credibility, probably illegal and very hard to pull off without a whistleblower. Not to mention it’s unncessary as OLEDs are better overall, although in some specific scenarios, p.ex. watching content or playing a game with extra bright scenes, LED LCDs do outperform OLEDs due to superior luminance but at the same time, LCDs lack the deep blacks and, especially TVs without Full-Array Local Dimming (p.ex. all 2017 Samsungs) suffer from blooming, haloing and such likes, people have made a science out of imperfections of picture quality on TVs and a special terminology is used in such a discourse.
    In my experience, both OLED and LCDs have the potential to show jaw-dropping picture but can also leave uninitiated users underwhelmed. Watching SD (480p) content on a B6, with out of the box picture settings in a lighted room, it’s nothing to write home about, a wife may not even notice the difference with the old TV

    Reply

  • animaleyezz
    May 12, 2017 at 1:47 am

    This “article” sounds very Anti-Samsung and very dismissive of the efforts they are putting forth to actually create a exciting and new category in television. While the technology hasn’t arrived to the level that we or even Samsung wants it. The infrastructure is being laid out and that’s a start. But rather than giving them props for the developments and improvements in their efforts you guys sound very, very critical of a step in the right direction.

    Reply

Leave a Response