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Here come Vizio’s new D-Series 4K ultra HD TVs, with excellent specs at budget prices

by on December 17, 2015
 

Stephan Jukic – December 17, 2015

CES 2016 is just weeks away and we’re already getting a strong vibe that it’s going to heavily be about the 4K UHD TVs of 2016 and all their related technologies.

With that, Vizio is preparing to wow its fans and consumers a bit early with the unveiling of its brand new D-Series 4K ultra HD and HD TVs as a sort of early present for the Christmas holidays.

Most interestingly, the now well-known 4K and HDTV maker has decided to actually forego CES 2016 itself in favor of simply offering its new TVs directly to consumers without all the trade show fanfare. As a result, here are the D-Series 4K and HD TVs, newly arrived to join the already popular P-Series, M-Series and the luxury Reference-Series 4K televisions already being offered by the company.

The new D-Series fill out a rather broad range of sizes, from an almost unparalleled 24 inches of tininess to a very hefty and immersive 70 inches. Furthermore, all of the TVs pack a fair bit of Vizio’s most consumer-friendly TV features and the larger models in the series also include 4K ultra HD resolution.

The 4K resolution applies only to the 40 inch and larger models –since the difference between Full HD and 4K UHD is barely notable at smaller TV screen sizes and normal viewing distances anyhow—and the entire line of TVs, both 1080p Full HD and 2160p 4K resolution and right down to the 40 inch model, comes with full-array backlighting, which is a consumer-friendly technological gift that no other major 4K and HD TV manufacturer has yet to offer in a whole line of televisions.

Full-array backlighting allows for much better control of contrast, local dimming and generally delivers a superior picture quality to that of the many edge-lit 4K TVs on the market right now. Instead of having LEDs only along their edges, Full-array televisions come with arrays of LEDs all along the back of their display panels, with the total number of LEDs and dimming zones dependent on the size of the screen.

In effect, the final result of full-array backlighting is a much better, richer and more precise level of contrast.

All of the Vizio D-Series 4K and HD TVs offer premium full-array LED backlighting

All of the Vizio D-Series 4K and HD TVs offer premium full-array LED backlighting

As for pricing, the new TVs start at a very cheap $170 for a truly tiny 24 inch model which also comes with Vizio’s pretty decent smart TV platform with Vizio Internet Apps Plus and other connectivity and content access features. From there, the TVs move up in price to the lowest priced 40 inch Smart TV with HD display costing just $350. The 4K model in this size hasn’t yet had its price revealed but Vizio claims that it will be “coming soon”.

As for the even larger 4K UHD versions of the new D-Series line, the lowest price we know of so far comes in at $730 for the 50 inch D50u-D1, and remember, that in addition to 4K resolution, this TV comes with full-array LED backlighting. Thus, the price quoted for it by Vizio is truly superb by FALD 4K TV standards.

And from this ultra-affordable 50 inch 4K model, we have the other end of the scale, the still extremely reasonably priced 70 inch full-array 4K UHD 70 inch D-Series model for a remarkably low $1,300.

Other features in these TVs include Vizio’s six-core processing technology, the already mentioned smart TV platform from the company, access to a whole host of 4K UHD content apps like Ultraflix, Vudu and Netflix, and connectivity via Ethernet and Vizio’s supposedly “ultra-fast dual-band WiFi technology. Additionally, all of the 4K models come with the company’s remarkably robust and precise “Spatial Scaling” content upscaling engine for enhancing standard HD content to near-4K levels of sharpness.

All of the new D-Series TVs can be seen and ordered right on Vizio’s own website and will soon be rolling out to both brick & mortar and online retailers.

Story by 4k.com

26 comments
 
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  • Alan
    December 18, 2015 at 7:58 am

    Any idea if these have 120Hz native refresh rate?

    Reply

  • Alan
    December 18, 2015 at 8:01 am

    Any idea if these will have native 120Hz refresh rate?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 18, 2015 at 3:01 pm

      Hello Alan, While the 4K models aren’t yet actually even posted on Vizio’s website and probably won’t be for at least a couple weeks or more, We can say this: The 50 inch Full HD D-Series TV that has been around for a while new has a 120Hz refresh rate, while the current Full HD 32 inch model comes with a 60Hz refresh. Thus it stands to reason that at least the 4K UHD models in the 40 inch and up range will come with 120Hz refresh, at the very least, the 50 inch 4K D-series TVs and larger will certainly have it.

      Reply

    • Tom
      December 24, 2015 at 11:21 am

      Vizio’s previous models (M/P series) had 120hz-240hz native refresh rate so i can almost certainly say the 2016 D Series will have it. Hopefully other companies follow suit and go with 120hz NRR with all their models including low tiers. Cant wait for official specs and an actual review for the Vizio 2016 Series. But can I wait another month before pulling the trigger on a 4K…especially since my FHD 47″ broke last month 😢

      Reply

  • Vizio Viewer
    December 19, 2015 at 3:55 pm

    The D-Series are listed on the Vizio site at the URL below; and it looks like the models listed as “2016” of the D-series, from 43″ and up, are all 120Hz.

    http://www.vizio.com/d-series

    Reply

    • Alan
      December 20, 2015 at 2:51 pm

      Effective refresh rate is different than Native refresh rate.

      Reply

      • Stephen
        Stephen
        December 21, 2015 at 11:57 am

        You are correct Alan, these terms sometimes get used interchangeably and I believe we’ve even been guilty of doing this in the past but the native rate is the actual signal response rate of the display in Hz and the effective rate is the “perceived” refresh after any and all motion effects wizardry has been put to use on what a viewer observes.

        Reply

  • Bryan
    December 30, 2015 at 8:28 am

    So which is the better series? I thought the M series was. Now I’m confused.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 30, 2015 at 10:29 am

      We haven’t yet had a chance to actually review the D-series and form a clear impression of their caliber bt I certainly hope they top the M-Series. Vizio’s M-Series TVs were remarkably fine models for their price and in many ways outperform other more expensive TVs we’ve seen. The larger models are particularly good.

      Reply

  • Bryan
    December 30, 2015 at 8:38 am

    Yeah. Just checked. All the M series cost more than the D series. So the D series are a newer model??? what gives?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      December 30, 2015 at 10:27 am

      Hey there Bryan. The D-Series are newer models but their focus is even more economy oriented than that of the M-Series I think (We haven’t yet had a chance to review a D-Series so can’t say for sure). That said, it’s partly also a general market trend. The prices of 4K TVs are falling and Vizio is particularly keen on putting out more affordable models at lower prices I believe.

      Reply

      • Ash
        February 9, 2016 at 9:03 am

        Hi Stephen, do you know how this compares as far as the hot new thing “HDR’? Is there Full-Array LED the same things as HDR on 4k?

        Reply

      • Ash
        February 9, 2016 at 9:04 am

        Hi Stephen, is their Full-Array LED the same thing as HDR?

        Reply

        • Stephen
          Stephen
          February 9, 2016 at 1:30 pm

          Hello Ash. No, Full-Array LED backlighting is a great technology but it isn’t the same as HDR, though it does significantly help with the quality of contrast in most cases. With HDR, the peak luminance and deepest possible darkness in a TV display on the single LED or pixel level are dramatically reduced or maximally augmented (if I recall the UHD Alliance standard is for 0.05 nits of darkness and 1000 nits of brightness in an LCD TV and 0.0005 nits of dark and 540 nits or more of brightness in an OLED 4K TV. A TV can have full-array lighting but not reach either of these levels and Vizio’s M- P- and D-Series 4K TVs don’t manage either as far as we have seen. They’re good, but not HDR good.

          Reply

  • T.J.
    February 12, 2016 at 1:49 pm

    I can’t decide between a 65″ m series or save a couple hundred bucks and go with the D series. Is there a noticeable difference in the picture between the two? I’ve heard some say they are indistinguishable in picture quality so no big loss going with the cheaper set. I haven’t had the chance to compare them myself yet. I may be looking too deeply into this as I’d most likely be satisfied with either.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      February 12, 2016 at 2:52 pm

      Hey there T.J, all things considered, I’d lean more towards the M-Series 4K TV. We haven’t yet had a chance to review the D-Series models so can’t speak in deep detail about our impression, but from what I’ve seen personally of them and heard from others as well, the M-Series is superior not only in picture quality but also in overall performance, particularly the larger models in the 55 inch + ranges. We consider the larger M-Series TVs to be some of the best on the market for their price right now and excepting a few issues with occasional glitches and a lack of a truly great smart TV OS, they’re worthwhile purchases.

      Reply

  • Angela
    February 13, 2016 at 3:08 pm

    From what I understand, the 50″ M Series has 32 dimmable zones. The 50″ D Series 4K has only 12. Don’t remember where I saw that so check it out for yourself. Would explain the lower price point on the D Series.

    And by the way, Vizio DID have the 4K D Series listed on their site not long ago. I see they’re no longer there. At that time, they had prices listed too. That has changed also.

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      February 13, 2016 at 3:50 pm

      Thank you for pointing this out Angela and yes I recall that the new 4K D-Series models offer fewer dimming zones. As for their removal from the Vizio site, perhaps you’re referring to the HD D-Series TVs, which were also sold by Vizio before upgrading that model type to 4K. The M-Series were at one time also HDTVs. We’ll be looking into this further for the sake of our review of these new models.

      Reply

  • Rich
    February 16, 2016 at 1:46 pm

    What is up with the one HDMI that has yellow label? Is that for your normal 1080P device (Game console/Cable box)… Does this the D55U-D1 do upconverting?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      February 17, 2016 at 10:35 pm

      Hello Rich, while I can’t speak for the yellow HDMI port label since we haven’t yet reviewed one of the D-Series 4K TVs, your TV should have upscaling capacity. All Vizio 4K TVs come with the feature and it’s called the Spatial Scaling Engine. It does come as part of the D-Series TVs’ feature set.

      Reply

  • Alex
    February 18, 2016 at 12:17 pm

    Are these capable of running 4K resolution at higher rates than 30Hz? Particularly using the 50″ and a PC with Mini-DP out?

    Reply

    • Stephen
      Stephen
      February 18, 2016 at 2:17 pm

      Hello Alex, while we haven’t yet reviewed the new D-Series 4K TVs, they should have no trouble handling 4K at faster than 30Hz. However, few 4K TVs and the D-Series included come with DisplayPort 1.2 or its mini counterpart. You’d have to connect to your PC GPU via HDMI 2.0 and only a few GPUs currently offer this connection option. Or you could get yourself a converter for Mini DP 1.2 to HDMI 2.0, such as this one http://www.anandtech.com/show/9867/club3d-releases-dp12-to-hdmi-20-adapter

      Reply

  • Tristan
    February 24, 2016 at 5:09 pm

    What is the difference between the d-serie and e-serie ??

    Reply

  • Mike
    February 25, 2016 at 12:23 pm

    Can you help me ? I have the 65″ D series and I’m having a hard time with the TV when it come to it receiving the high speed wifi signal. I have everything set up right. My internet speed is 45mbps and when I run the ethernet cablre from my moden to the tv, The tv gets 209 kb and when I use wifi it gets around 300…. That’s what the tv tells me. First of all , Shouldn’t I get a stronger signal from a cable as compared to wifi ? The tv is only about 15′ from my modem? I can’t understand why it’s telling me such low numbers, I shouldn’t buffer if I’m getting 45mbps.

    Reply

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